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How to Identify & Prevent Pressure Ulcers. The Skin Human body’s largest organ Body’s first line of defense.

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Presentation on theme: "How to Identify & Prevent Pressure Ulcers. The Skin Human body’s largest organ Body’s first line of defense."— Presentation transcript:

1 How to Identify & Prevent Pressure Ulcers

2 The Skin Human body’s largest organ Body’s first line of defense

3 Functions of the Skin Protection Regulation Sensation Metabolism Communication

4 What is a Pressure Ulcer? A sore caused by constant, unrelieved pressure to the skin and underlying tissue. The pressure comes from outside the body.

5 How does one form? Pressure slows the blood flow to an area which leads to tissue death “Friction” and “shear” can add to the problem

6 Where do they form? Pressure ulcers most often form over bony areas on the body

7 What does it mean to “stage” a pressure ulcer? Pressure ulcers are graded or “staged” to indicate the amount of tissue damage Stage 1, Stage 2, Stage 3, and Stage 4

8 Who is MORE likely to develop a pressure ulcer? There are “Risk Factors” that when present, make a resident MORE likely to develop a pressure ulcer

9 Risk Factors Poor nutrition Unintentional weight loss

10 Risk Factors Inability to easily move or reposition Incontinence

11 A resident who spends most of their time sitting in a chair or in a wheelchair, is also at risk for developing a pressure ulcer. Risk Factors

12 Inability to feel and report pain Lowered mental awareness

13 Risk Factors When you see even one or two of these risk factors, be on the lookout. This resident is at greater risk of developing a pressure ulcer.

14 When to check the skin Every time you change, help to the toilet, dress, bathe, transfer, and/or turn a resident... you have a chance to check and care for a resident’s skin.

15 What to look for on the skin An area of skin that is noticeably different than the surrounding area It may look red, and the redness does not “fade” when the skin is touched, and released (blanched).

16 Residents with darker skin For residents with darker skin, the skin may look darker or lighter than the surrounding skin. Skin may look a little: red, blue, or purple in color.

17 Another thing to try... Gently feel for a change in skin temperature: it may feel warmer or cooler than the surrounding area. A “suspicious area” may feel "spongy“ or "raised".

18 Look for areas of redness that are “non-blanchable*” What is “blanchable”? Note: Redness should fade, when the skin is *touched and released.

19 Back of the head, ears, shoulder blades, elbows, tailbone, buttocks, hips, and heels. Common places to find a pressure ulcer

20 Pressure ulcers usually form over a bony part of the body. Common places to find a pressure ulcer

21 Tip: Good Lighting When you check a resident’s skin, be sure to have good lighting.

22 Prevention Skin Care –Check the skin on daily basis. –Check the skin while performing other care giving tasks Healthy skin is clean and moisturized, not dry, cracked, or scaly.

23 Nutrition and eating –Encourage residents to eat and drink –Assist residents with eating –Feed residents unable to feed themselves Repositioning –Turning –Encourage residents to shift position Prevention

24 Positioning –Encourage residents to make small shifts in position –Keep head of bed at 30° or less –Heels elevated off mattress supported by pillows under the legs –Use a pillow to keep the knees and heels from rubbing together –Turning Schedule for residents who cannot move by themselves Prevention

25 Tip: Use a pillow After turning or helping a resident shift their weight, use a pillow to support the new position in the bed or chair.

26 Review encourage small shifts in weight if the resident is able if a resident is on a turning schedule, be sure to stick to the schedule Prevention is the key

27 Review care for a resident’s skin (Healthy skin is clean and moisturized, NOT soiled, dry, cracked, or flakey.) Prevention is the key

28 Review encourage or assist a resident to eat their food and drink their water Prevention is the key

29 Review Always be on the look-out check a resident’s skin each time you change, help to the toilet, dress, transfer, bathe, or otherwise have an opportunity.

30 Review Always be on the look-out look for an area of skin that looks noticeably different than the surrounding areas especially on skin over the bony parts of the body

31 Review You have a great opportunity to positively IMPACT the health and well-being of nursing home residents.

32 If you see even a small change in a resident’s skin – TELL SOMEONE TELL SOMEONE, until you are SURE they hear you. Review


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