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State of Illinois Pat Quinn, Governor Dept. of Human Services Michelle Saddler, Secretary Illinois School f/t Deaf Dr. Janice Smith-Warshaw, Supt. ISD.

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Presentation on theme: "State of Illinois Pat Quinn, Governor Dept. of Human Services Michelle Saddler, Secretary Illinois School f/t Deaf Dr. Janice Smith-Warshaw, Supt. ISD."— Presentation transcript:

1 State of Illinois Pat Quinn, Governor Dept. of Human Services Michelle Saddler, Secretary Illinois School f/t Deaf Dr. Janice Smith-Warshaw, Supt. ISD website: ILLINOIS SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF 125 Webster, Jacksonville, IL The mission of the Illinois School for the Deaf is to educate students who are deaf or hard of hearing to be responsible, self supporting citizens.

2 State of Illinois Pat Quinn, Governor Dept. of Human Services Michelle Saddler, Secretary Illinois School f/t Deaf Dr. Janice Smith-Warshaw, Supt. ISD Outreach website: Like us on Facebook! bit.ly/isdoutreach FREE training and consultation in support of Illinois children who are deaf or hard of hearing ILLINOIS SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF OUTREACH

3 The Impact of Hearing Loss …or “A Little Hearing Loss is a Big Thing”

4 Objectives The audience will: Understand “a little hearing loss is a big thing” Be aware of “red flag” behaviors Learn accommodation strategies Better understand how to work with an educational interpreter

5 From Oliver Sacks “Seeing Voices” “Unless special measures are taken, the average deaf child will have only fifty to sixty words at the age of six, whereas the average hearing child has three thousand.”

6 And... “If communication goes awry, it affects the intellectual growth, social intercourse, language development, and emotional attitudes, all at once, simultaneously and inseparable.”

7 A Word About Words Deaf vs. deaf Dumb vs. mute Hearing Impaired “People first” language Decibel (dB)

8 Degrees of Hearing Loss Normal Hearing Mild Hearing Loss Moderate Hearing Loss Severe Hearing Loss Profound

9 Spelling Test Listen carefully!

10 A mild hearing loss can cause a child to be a grade level behind in reading and math! Max Stanley Chartrand Ph.D., Health & Human Services/Research in Commuunicative Disorders

11 A child with a mild hearing loss can pass the school hearing screening!

12 “Children with a unilateral hearing loss are 10 times as likely to be held back at least one grade level compared with children with normal hearing.” Self Help for Hard of Hearing

13 Ear Infections Can cause a mild hearing loss Recurring incidence Allergies Symptoms

14 So…. ….What would you have missed in your household this morning if you couldn’t hear?

15 It’s more than a hearing loss… It means losing the ability to connect with those around you. Input for developing speech/language Communication Language Academic and social skills

16 Think about it! Linguistic structures Optimum language learning Early identification

17 Impact of Hearing Loss Normal Mild Moderate 1 year 2.0 years 2.9 years Degree of LossLanguage Delay

18 Impact of Hearing Loss Moderate/Severe Severe Profound 3.5+years Degree of LossLanguage Delay

19 Impact of Hearing Loss

20 Impact in the classroom Teacher’s voice Acoustics Academic performance (MARRS Project )

21 Amplification Hearing aidsCochlear implants

22 Amplification FM systemsSound field systems

23 Red Flag Behaviors Inattentive Asks for repetition Speech, language problems Allergies, colds, ear infections

24 More Red Flag Behaviors Omits endings “sh”, “s”, “th”, “f” Very visual Inconsistent hearing Answers unrelated to questions

25 Even More Red Flag Behaviors Ear pain; tugs ear Poor balance Loud noises are painful Short attention span

26 Still More… Distractible Immaturity Fails to follow directions Loses place while reading

27 Not done yet…. Strains to listen, favors one ear Uses inappropriate speaking behavior Watches speaker’s face more than normal

28 What if you suspect a hearing loss? Refer to the school nurse for screening Parents can also ask for a referral to –the school nurse –an audiologist –an ENT (eye, ear, nose and throat doctor)

29 Educational Responsibilities IDEA requires: Special needs be considered Individual Education Plan (IEP) A Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE)

30 Educational Responsibilities IDEA requires: Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) US Dept. of Education Public Act

31 In the Classroom Tips: Attitude Educate class on hearing loss Encourage class participation Encourage interaction Adapted from Daniel Ononiwu, Deaf Education Consultant

32 In the Classroom Tips: Seating Environmental noise Stand still! Adapted from Daniel Ononiwu, Deaf Education Consultant

33 In the Classroom Tips: Talking Face student Stand away from windows/bright lights Speak at moderate pace Use normal mouth movements Indicate when others are talking Adapted from Daniel Ononiwu, Deaf Education Consultant

34 In the Classroom Tips: Talking Facial hair Intelligibility Rephrase Covering face Adapted from Daniel Ononiwu, Deaf Education Consultant

35 In the Classroom Tips: Announcements Vocabulary Give material in advance Captioned videos Written tests Adapted from Daniel Ononiwu, Deaf Education Consultant

36 In the Classroom Tips: Check for understanding Visual fatigue Emergencies Note taker Interpreter Adapted from Daniel Ononiwu, Deaf Education Consultant

37 Educational Interpreters Trained professionals ISBE Approval Standards Code of Ethics Convey ALL interactions Do not add/delete information Do not offer opinions

38 Educational Interpreters Questions for you! Is it easy to learn using an interpreter? Are the interpreter’s skills important? Quality of education Student success

39 Role of the Educational Interpreter Levels of Responsibility Student Interpreter Young child High School

40 Educational Interpreters CANNOT Assume teacher/aide responsibilities Be responsible for managing or disciplining the class Be responsible for disciplining the student who is deaf or hard of hearing

41 Working with an Interpreter Tips: Look at the student when speaking Use normal tone/speed Use the first/second person only Correct: “Did you understand the story?” Incorrect: “Ask her if she understood the story.”

42 Tips Lag time Clarification Positioning Working with an Interpreter

43 Tips Visual Information Attention Notes Worksheets Visual Fatigue Working with an Interpreter

44 Summary Even a little hearing loss can be a big thing. Hearing loss impacts language development, academic growth, communication, and social-emotional development. Early identification and intervention is key to keeping children with a hearing loss on track. Amplification can be specific to an individual or provided as a classroom intervention. Connecting the dots of red flag behaviors can aid with early identification.

45 Summary Every student has the right to a free and appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment. Classroom accommodations should be implemented as soon as a hearing loss is identified. Illinois School for the Deaf Outreach provides free resources and training to schools (with CPDUs), communities, and parents throughout the state of Illinois.

46 Questions? Thank you for your time and attention!


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