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TIPS Communication Courtesy when interacting with deaf and interacting with deaf and hard of hearing students The Cooperative Program for the Deaf and.

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Presentation on theme: "TIPS Communication Courtesy when interacting with deaf and interacting with deaf and hard of hearing students The Cooperative Program for the Deaf and."— Presentation transcript:

1 TIPS Communication Courtesy when interacting with deaf and interacting with deaf and hard of hearing students The Cooperative Program for the Deaf and the Blind

2 LOOK …at and speak directly to the deaf or hard of hearing person. Do not say, “tell him…” or “ask her…” to the interpreter. …at and speak directly to the deaf or hard of hearing person. Do not say, “tell him…” or “ask her…” to the interpreter. The deaf or hard of hearing person will be watching the interpreter and glancing back and forth. The deaf or hard of hearing person will be watching the interpreter and glancing back and forth. Working With a Sign Language Interpreter. Retrieved October 15, 2008 from

3 SPEAK …at your natural pace, but be aware that the interpreter may wait to hear and understand a complete thought before beginning to interpret. …at your natural pace, but be aware that the interpreter may wait to hear and understand a complete thought before beginning to interpret. The interpreter will let you know if you need to repeat or slow down. The interpreter will let you know if you need to repeat or slow down. Downs, S., Owen, C., Vammen, A. (n.d.). Make a difference: Tips for teaching students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Retrieved October 15, 2008 from

4 TURN-TAKING …will ensure that the deaf or hard of hearing student has equal opportunity to participate in classroom discussions and ask questions. …will ensure that the deaf or hard of hearing student has equal opportunity to participate in classroom discussions and ask questions. Please have everyone in the group speak one at a time, so that communication is optimal for all parties. Please have everyone in the group speak one at a time, so that communication is optimal for all parties. The interpreter can indicate to the deaf or hard of hearing student who is speaking; however, the interpreter is only able to relay comments from one person at a time. The interpreter can indicate to the deaf or hard of hearing student who is speaking; however, the interpreter is only able to relay comments from one person at a time. Working With a Sign Language Interpreter. Retrieved October 15, 2008 from

5 Avoid …private conversations with the interpreter or others in the presence of a deaf or hard of hearing student. …private conversations with the interpreter or others in the presence of a deaf or hard of hearing student. Interpreters must ethically interpret everything they hear. Interpreters must ethically interpret everything they hear. Downs, S., Owen, C., Vammen, A. (n.d.). Make a difference: Tips for teaching students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Retrieved October 15, 2008 from

6 TIPS Strategies for Teaching Students who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing Strategies for Teaching Students who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

7 BE AWARE …of noise level. Hard of hearing students may be very sensitive to environmental and background noise, which may “mask” speech. …of noise level. Hard of hearing students may be very sensitive to environmental and background noise, which may “mask” speech. Background noise should be kept to a minimum. Background noise should be kept to a minimum. Downs, S., Owen, C., Vammen, A. (n.d.). Make a difference: Tips for teaching students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Retrieved October 15, 2008 from

8 VISUAL AIDS …enhance communication with most students. …enhance communication with most students. Pause before giving your explanation of any visual aid so that the deaf or hard of hearing person has time to see it, look back at the interpreter, and still keep up with the information being presented. Pause before giving your explanation of any visual aid so that the deaf or hard of hearing person has time to see it, look back at the interpreter, and still keep up with the information being presented. Working With a Sign Language Interpreter. Retrieved October 15, 2008 from

9 WINDOWS AND BACK LIGHTING …create shadows on faces, and make it hard to read linguistic cues and can render a distorted message. …create shadows on faces, and make it hard to read linguistic cues and can render a distorted message. If you dim the lights for a video or overhead projector, be sure there is enough light for the student to see the interpreter. If you dim the lights for a video or overhead projector, be sure there is enough light for the student to see the interpreter. Downs, S., Owen, C., Vammen, A. (n.d.). Make a difference: Tips for teaching students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Retrieved October 15, 2008 from Working With a Sign Language Interpreter. Retrieved October 15, 2008 from

10 CLOSED CAPTIONING …should be used whenever possible when showing videos. …should be used whenever possible when showing videos. Captioning allows the deaf or hard of hearing person to follow the action of the video while still being able to read the words being spoken, all in the same visual space. Captioning allows the deaf or hard of hearing person to follow the action of the video while still being able to read the words being spoken, all in the same visual space. Working With a Sign Language Interpreter. Retrieved October 15, 2008 from

11 Provide …word lists of technical or unfamiliar terminology and/or videos that are not closed captioned to the interpreter ahead of time. …word lists of technical or unfamiliar terminology and/or videos that are not closed captioned to the interpreter ahead of time. Downs, S., Owen, C., Vammen, A. (n.d.). Make a difference: Tips for teaching students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Retrieved October 15, 2008 from

12 Remember …students who use interpreters are receiving the information several seconds after the rest of the class. …students who use interpreters are receiving the information several seconds after the rest of the class. Allow time for the student to get the information from the interpreter before calling on someone. Allow time for the student to get the information from the interpreter before calling on someone. Downs, S., Owen, C., Vammen, A. (n.d.). Make a difference: Tips for teaching students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Retrieved October 15, 2008 from

13 Repeat …questions from the class before responding. …questions from the class before responding. A student using an assistive listening device hears only what comes from the microphone. He or she may miss spoken information from other sources. A student using an assistive listening device hears only what comes from the microphone. He or she may miss spoken information from other sources. Downs, S., Owen, C., Vammen, A. (n.d.). Make a difference: Tips for teaching students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Retrieved October 15, 2008 from

14 Don’t …talk to the class while you are having them read something. …talk to the class while you are having them read something. It would be a good idea to get the deaf or hard of hearing student’s attention before talking about the reading material. It would be a good idea to get the deaf or hard of hearing student’s attention before talking about the reading material. Downs, S., Owen, C., Vammen, A. (n.d.). Make a difference: Tips for teaching students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Retrieved October 15, 2008 from

15 References Downs, S., Owen, C., Vammen, A. (n.d.). Make a difference: Tips for teaching students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Retrieved October 15, 2008 from Working With a Sign Language Interpreter. (n.d.) Retrieved October 15, 2008 from hinterpreters.htm. hinterpreters.htm hinterpreters.htm


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