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Understanding by Design An Overview by Eduardo M. Valerio, Ph.D.

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Presentation on theme: "Understanding by Design An Overview by Eduardo M. Valerio, Ph.D."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Understanding by Design An Overview by Eduardo M. Valerio, Ph.D.

3 The Authors Grant Wiggins Grant Wiggins Grant Wiggins, Ed.D., is the President and Director of Programs for Relearning by Design, a not-for-profit educational organization in Pennington, NJ.

4 The Authors Jay McTighe Jay McTighe provides consulting services to schools, districts, regional service agencies and state departments of education. He is an experienced educator and noted author who also makes effective presentations at conferences. Jay McTighe Jay McTighe provides consulting services to schools, districts, regional service agencies and state departments of education. He is an experienced educator and noted author who also makes effective presentations at conferences.

5 Using WHERE Designing lessons “backward” from standards… Designing lessons “backward” from standards…

6 Using WHERE

7 “W” stands for students knowing Where they are heading, Where they are heading, Why they are heading there, Why they are heading there, What they know, What they know, Where they might go wrong in the process, and Where they might go wrong in the process, and What is required of them. What is required of them.

8 Using WHERE H stands for Hooking the students on the topic of study Hooking the students on the topic of study

9 Using WHERE E stands for students Exploring and Exploring and Experiencing ideas and being Experiencing ideas and being Equipped with the necessary understanding to master the standard being taught. Equipped with the necessary understanding to master the standard being taught.

10 Using WHERE R stands for providing opportunities for students to Rehearse, Rehearse, Revise, and Revise, and Refine their work. Refine their work.

11 Using WHERE Estands for student Evaluation Evaluation Resource: Backwards Design from Standards to Lesson Plans Also available on course homepage: Course Info, Current Semester, Articles for LANG 313, Understanding by Design Articles and Resource Links, Using WHERE to Create Lesson Plans

12 Backward design is… Compatible with other programs or approaches and should be considered a framework that can be used to assist teachers in designing or redesigning teaching materials to enhance learning understanding. Compatible with other programs or approaches and should be considered a framework that can be used to assist teachers in designing or redesigning teaching materials to enhance learning understanding.

13 Stages of Backward Design IdentifyStage 1 desired desired results results

14 Stages of Backward Design Determine Stage 2 acceptable acceptable evidence evidence

15 Stages of Backward Design Stage 3 Stage 3 Plan learning experiences and instruction and instruction

16 Thinking through Stage 1 First, decide the field of possible content (topics, skills, and resources) valuable for study

17 Thinking through Stage 1 Sharpen choices to specify important knowledge students must know…

18 Thinking through Stage 1 Big ideas and important understandings that students should retain beyond the details they studied Anchors…

19 Filtering Decisions in Stage 1 Does the idea, topic or process represent a “big idea” (endures beyond the details) Does the idea, topic or process represent a “big idea” (endures beyond the details) …Can you relate your idea, topic or process that will “anchor” it to something meaningful? BIG IDEA

20 Filtering Decisions in Stage 1 Does the idea, topic or process reside at the heart of the discipline? (relevance, authenticity, centrality) Does the idea, topic or process reside at the heart of the discipline? (relevance, authenticity, centrality)

21 Filtering Decisions in Stage 1 To what extent does the idea, topic or process require “uncoverage?” (Additional information or background to avoid misconceptions or errors in thinking) To what extent does the idea, topic or process require “uncoverage?” (Additional information or background to avoid misconceptions or errors in thinking)(bullfighting)

22 Filtering Decisions in Stage 1 To what extent does the idea, topic or process offer potential for engaging students? To what extent does the idea, topic or process offer potential for engaging students? Bring textbook study to life through inquiry, simulation, debate or other kinds of inherently engaging experiences.

23 Filtering Decisions in Stage 1 To what extent does the idea, topic or process offer potential for engaging students? To what extent does the idea, topic or process offer potential for engaging students? Consider moving away from the textbook— using it to guide content or topics, but not “following” the textbook and the exercises as a prescription for language learning.

24 Filtering Decisions in Stage 1 To what extent does the idea, topic or process offer potential for engaging students? To what extent does the idea, topic or process offer potential for engaging students? Design lessons to provoke student interest by asking questions, discussing issues or problems.

25 Filtering Decisions in Stage 1 To what extent does the idea, topic or process offer potential for engaging students? To what extent does the idea, topic or process offer potential for engaging students? Design one question or discussion to serve as a gateway to other ideas or topics.

26 Filtering Decisions in Stage 2 Determine Acceptable Evidence How will we know if students have achieved the desired results and met the standards? How will we know if students have achieved the desired results and met the standards? What will we accept as evidence of student understanding and proficiency? What will we accept as evidence of student understanding and proficiency?

27 Filtering Decisions in Stage 2 Determine Acceptable Evidence Think in terms of the collected assessment evidence— not just content to be covered or a series of learning activities… Think in terms of the collected assessment evidence— not just content to be covered or a series of learning activities…

28 Filtering Decisions in Stage 2 Determine Acceptable Evidence Continuum of Assessment Methods…  Informal checks for understanding  Observation/Dialogue  Quiz/Test  Academic Prompt ( stimulates critical thinking… )  Performance task/Project

29 Filtering Decisions in Stage 2 Determine Acceptable Evidence Use assessments appropriately to evaluate student achievement among the three levels of instruction in Stage 1 See Chapter 1 figure 1.5

30 Filtering Decisions in Stage 3 Plan Learning Experiences and Instruction Once clearly identified results have been identified (enduring understanding and appropriate evidence), consider how to plan instructional activities to produce learner language skills and cultural understanding that can be demonstrated. Once clearly identified results have been identified (enduring understanding and appropriate evidence), consider how to plan instructional activities to produce learner language skills and cultural understanding that can be demonstrated.

31 Filtering Decisions in Stage 3 Plan Learning Experiences and Instruction What enabling knowledge (facts, concepts, and principles) and skills (procedures) will students need to perform effectively to achieve desired results? What enabling knowledge (facts, concepts, and principles) and skills (procedures) will students need to perform effectively to achieve desired results?

32 Filtering Decisions in Stage 3 Plan Learning Experiences and Instruction What activities will equip students with needed knowledge and skills? What activities will equip students with needed knowledge and skills?

33 Filtering Decisions in Stage 3 Plan Learning Experiences and Instruction What will need to be taught and coached, and how should it best be taught, in light of performance goals? What will need to be taught and coached, and how should it best be taught, in light of performance goals?

34 Filtering Decisions in Stage 3 Plan Learning Experiences and Instruction Is the overall design coherent and effective? Is the overall design coherent and effective?

35 Big Picture of a Design Approach Key Design Question Design Considerations Filters (Design Criteria) What the Final Design Accomplishes Stage 1 What content is worthy? National and State Standards… Enduring ideas AuthenticRelevant… Unit framed around worthy knowledge… Stage 2 What is evidence? Six facets of understanding Continuum of Valid. Reliable. Sufficient. Authentic… Unit anchored in credible evidence of … Stage 3 What learning experiences… Research- based repertoire… WHERE Hook the students… Coherent learning experiences…

36 Big Picture of a Design Approach The complete graphic for this table is available at the end of Chapter Two in Understanding by Design The complete graphic for this table is available at the end of Chapter Two in Understanding by Design As you scroll down, review all the figures up to this point…

37 Goal Work to develop understanding, which is fundamentally different from knowledge and skill. Work to develop understanding, which is fundamentally different from knowledge and skill. You can use these principles to guide you into effective unit building and directing curriculum elements toward greater learning and student engagement You can use these principles to guide you into effective unit building and directing curriculum elements toward greater learning and student engagement

38 Integrated Performance Assessment Interpretive Task(Feedback) Interpretive Task(Feedback) Interpersonal Task(Feedback) Interpersonal Task(Feedback) Presentational Task(Feedback) Presentational Task(Feedback)

39 Integrated Performance Assessment This type of effective “backward design” teaching plan is described in the Annenberg Library video on Assessment Strategies (#3) … This type of effective “backward design” teaching plan is described in the Annenberg Library video on Assessment Strategies (#3) …

40 End of presentation


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