Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

SAFETEA-LU: Wildlife and Highways Sandra L. Jacobson Wildlife Biologist USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station Redwood Sciences Lab Arcata.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "SAFETEA-LU: Wildlife and Highways Sandra L. Jacobson Wildlife Biologist USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station Redwood Sciences Lab Arcata."— Presentation transcript:

1 SAFETEA-LU: Wildlife and Highways Sandra L. Jacobson Wildlife Biologist USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station Redwood Sciences Lab Arcata CA Sandra L. Jacobson Wildlife Biologist USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station Redwood Sciences Lab Arcata CA

2 Loss of Open Space One of “Four Threats” to National Forest System lands identified by Chief Results in wildlife habitat fragmentation One of “Four Threats” to National Forest System lands identified by Chief Results in wildlife habitat fragmentation Tom Iraci USDA Forest Service

3 Loss of Open Space Integration of wildlife issues in transportation planning helps alleviate impacts

4 Tom Iraci USDA Forest Service 3 million people live within 20 miles of the San Bernardino and Angeles National Forests Open Space Conservation is Tied to Transportation Planning

5 We Can’t Manage Wildlife Only Within Our Administrative Boundaries Dave Romero, USDA Forest Service, Bitterroot National Forest

6 Public land management agency State Department of Transportation Private landowners Hunters and state wildlife agency Public land management agency State Department of Transportation Private landowners Hunters and state wildlife agency Heidi Birkley, Black Hills National Forest Example: Migratory Deer Stakeholders

7 Highways are Permanent Gateways to Public Lands George Wuerthner, USDA Forest Service John Romanowski, USDA Forest Service Mike Delasaux, UC Davis Ag Extension

8 SAFETEA-LU Provides Opportunities to Integrate Natural Resource Management with Transportation Planning

9 DOTs Value Public Lands for Highways Few houses destroyed Usually fewer 4f issues Land relatively unemcumbered In most cases, DOTs do not pay for easements Few houses destroyed Usually fewer 4f issues Land relatively unemcumbered In most cases, DOTs do not pay for easements Stephen Peel

10 Some Highway Impacts to Wildlife Direct Habitat Loss Vehicle-caused Mortality

11 Some Highway Impacts to Wildlife Habitat Fragmentation Pollution Terry Spivey, USDA Forest Service

12 SAFETEA-LU Can Help Mitigate Impacts Better collaboration Funding people Funding research

13 Statewide Connectivity Plans Efficient All stakeholders Identify and prioritize important wildlife linkage areas

14 State Transportation Improvement Plans and SAFETEA-LU State connectivity plans help partner agencies propose and support projects SAFETEA-LU authorizes funding for –agency personnel –research –training in best practices

15 Can We Mitigate Impacts from Highways? Research can help develop tools and processes to minimize impacts Sierraville Highway 89 Stewardship Team, Tahoe National Forest

16 Lessons Learned Diversion fencing combined with wildlife crossing structures are the most effective tool to reduce mortality and maintain habitat connectivity (96-100%) Resources module has more info Underpasses on the Tonto National Forest

17 Safety and Wildlife Collisions The most common rural accident is animal/vehicle collision Employee safety: Most common forward-moving accident in some FS regions Colorado DOT

18 It’s Our Choice—and Opportunity!— to Get Involved Early and Often in Transportation Planning Charles T. Bryson, USDA Agricultural Research Service,


Download ppt "SAFETEA-LU: Wildlife and Highways Sandra L. Jacobson Wildlife Biologist USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station Redwood Sciences Lab Arcata."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google