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Early American Foreign Policy Leads to the War of 1812 1812- 1815 APUSH.

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Presentation on theme: "Early American Foreign Policy Leads to the War of 1812 1812- 1815 APUSH."— Presentation transcript:

1 Early American Foreign Policy Leads to the War of APUSH

2 Early Foreign Policy Problems Washington –Problems with both GB and France –Neutrality Proclamation, 1793 Adams –More problems with GB → Jay’s Treaty not followed –More problems with FR → Quasi War Jefferson – No military → Barbary Pirate problem – Embargo disaster

3 Madison’s long-term Foreign Policy Problems A little about Madison… –“federalist” not “Federalist” “War Hawks” angry –DR Congressmen from the West –Upset with GB for blockading, privateering & impressment British Orders in Council v. Napoleon’s Continental System –Saw W. expansion as a “right” –Desired British Canada

4 Heading to War HMS Leopard vs. USS Chesapeake Battle of Tippecanoe –WH Harrison v. Tecumseh War! Above: the HMS Leopard vs. USS Chesapeake Below left: WH Harrison, Below right: Tecumseh Left: Madison’s War Message to Congress

5 The War in US attempts to invade Canada fail –US morale in the tank US Navy does (surprisingly) well –“Old Ironsides” –Rallies US morale –US commissions privateers Brutal fighting in the West –Massacre at River Raisin

6 The War in 1813 Beginning of the end for Tecumseh –Battle of Stoney Creek Battle of Lake Erie Battle of the Thames Invasion of Canada (again) Winter of Horrors –Burning & looting –Lundy’s Lane Above: Tecumseh v. Wm H Harrison Below: Oliver Perry & the Battle on Lake Erie Bottom Left: Lawrence’s Last Words

7 The War in the summer of 1814 Washington DC burned Hartford Convention meets Canada invades –Battle of Plattsburgh Bay Battle of Baltimore –F.S. Key & the National Anthem… Left: White House burned Right: Burning of Washington

8 Battle of Baltimore- The story behind the Star Spangled Banner Left: American flag that endured the Fort McHenry attack Above: Fort McHenry Under Attack, Smithsonian Museum for American History

9 The Star-Spangled Banner —Francis Scott Key, 1814 O say, can you see, by the dawn's early light, What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming? Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight, O'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming? And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air, Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there. O say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

10 Verse 2 On the shore dimly seen thro' the mists of the deep, Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes, What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep, As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses? Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam, In full glory reflected, now shines on the stream: 'Tis the star-spangled banner: O, long may it wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

11 Verse 3 And where is that band who so vauntingly swore That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion, A home and a country should leave us no more? Their blood has wash'd out their foul footsteps' pollution. No refuge could save the hireling and slave From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave: And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

12 Verse 4 O thus be it ever when free-men shall stand Between their lov'd home and the war's desolation; Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the heav'n-rescued land Praise the Pow'r that hath made and preserv'd us a nation! Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just, And this be our motto: “In God is our trust!” And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

13 The War in 1815 Hartford Convention –E nd of Federalists New Orleans victory (Jan 1815) –Andrew Jackson becomes a hero –http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LsRK3DNoa_Qhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LsRK3DNoa_Q But…Treaty of Ghent (Dec 1814) –“status quo antebellum” Beginning of the Era of Good Feelings Top: Symbolic Representation of the Treaty of Ghent Bottom Left: The Battle of New Orleans Bottom Middle: Andrew Jackson Bottom Right: Political cartoon satirizing the Hartford Convention’s “Big Leap”


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