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Prepared Especially for the Professional Learning Network of the BROOKWOOD CLUSTER by Dan Mulligan, Ed. D. August 2011 Craig ES Brookwood HS Alton C. Crews.

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Presentation on theme: "Prepared Especially for the Professional Learning Network of the BROOKWOOD CLUSTER by Dan Mulligan, Ed. D. August 2011 Craig ES Brookwood HS Alton C. Crews."— Presentation transcript:

1 Prepared Especially for the Professional Learning Network of the BROOKWOOD CLUSTER by Dan Mulligan, Ed. D. August 2011 Craig ES Brookwood HS Alton C. Crews MS Brookwood ES R.D. Head ES Five Forks MS Gwin Oaks ES

2 Premise of the Session As the United States continues to compete in a global economy that demands innovation, the U.S. education system must equip students with the four Cs: 1. C ritical thinking and problem solving, 2. C ommunication, 3. C ollaboration, and 4. C reativity and innovation.

3 epals.com

4 The value of teacher teams analyzing student achievement data to improve TEACHING and LEARNING is dependent on the VALIDITY and RELIABILITY of the assessment used to generate the achievement data. Mulligan, 2011 The value of teacher teams analyzing student achievement data to improve TEACHING and LEARNING is dependent on the VALIDITY and RELIABILITY of the assessment used to generate the achievement data. Mulligan, 2011

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6 Find a new friend in the room. Introduce yourself and share what you ‘do’. Find 2 comfortable seats and relax.

7 Grade 2 Academic Knowledge and Skills

8 a. The number of cavities the sixth graders have? b. The number of people in the sixth graders’ families? c. The ages of the sixth graders’ mothers? d. The heights of the sixth graders in inches?

9 MOVING from ETCH-a SKETCH Learning to Each STUDENT UNDERSTANDING Don’t let the ‘what’ overshadow the ‘how!’

10 The Power of Our Questions

11 QUESTIONS TO EXTEND THINKING page 5 – 7

12 There are three parts to any research-based lesson: Beginning – ‘check for’ and ‘build’ background knowledge of each student; (BL) During – teach and actively engage each student in new content – making connections to prior knowledge; (DL) End – check for understanding - provide each student with an opportunity to summarize (in their own way) and practice the essential knowledge and skills conveyed in the lesson. (EL)

13 SAMPLE Pre-assessment that includes differentiation SAMPLE Pre-assessment that includes differentiation

14 “If you don’t know where you are and you don’t know where you are going, anything you do will get you there”

15 Record your response to each question…

16 1.The % of Non-Poverty students scoring EXCEEDS on the Grade 3 CRCT Reading test in The % of Poverty students scoring EXCEEDS on the Grade 3 CRCT Reading test in The % of Non-Poverty students scoring EXCEEDS on the Grade 6 CRCT Reading/ELA test in The % of Poverty students scoring EXCEEDS on the Grade 6 CRCT Reading/ELA test in According to the Silent Epidemic, the percent of U.S. dropouts who would have stayed in school if learning was more interesting and real-world. 6.According to the Silent Epidemic, the % of U.S. dropouts who felt they were ‘too far behind’ by the end of elementary school. 7.The % of ALL students scoring Graduating On-Time in Class of The % of ELL(LEP) students Graduating On-Time in the Class of At the Brookwood Cluster: SOLUTIONS: 44, 44, 46, 51, 62, 67, 80, 94 94

17 Self Reliance There are three types of baseball players--those who make it happen, those who watch it happen, and those who wonder what happened. Tommy Lasorda teachers/administrators

18 Minority Student Achievement in Suburban Schools ~Toward Excellence with Equity, Minority Student Achievement in Suburban Schools ~Toward Excellence with Equity, Ronald Ferguson, Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, 2007 Survey of all students in 15 middle & upper income districts in 10 states; Examined family characteristics, opinions about quality of instruction, achievement motivation, course-taking, effort, comprehension, GPA and other factors; When I work hard, it is because my teacher tells me I can do well. (“Yes,” instead of “Maybe” or “No”) When I work hard, it is because my teacher tells me I can do well. (“Yes,” instead of “Maybe” or “No”)

19 Mission Statement The mission of Gwinnett County Public Schools is to pursue excellence in academic knowledge, skills, and behavior for each student resulting in measured improvement against local, national, and world-class standards.

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21 21 Identifying Similarities and Differences

22 What processes can students engage in to identify similarities and differences? Comparing The process of identifying and articulating similarities and differences among items. Classifying The process of grouping things into definable categories on the basis of their attributes. Creating Metaphors The process of identifying and articulating the underlying theme or general pattern in information. Creating Analogies The process of identifying relationships between pairs of concepts (e.g., relationships between relationships).

23 Similarities and Differences Analogies putter putter is to a set of golf clubs as 2 is to the set of primes 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, … What is the common relationship?

24 Conceptual Knowledge Students demonstrate conceptual understanding when they: Recognize, label, and general examples and non-examples of concepts; Use and interrelate models, diagrams, manipulatives, and so on; Know and apply facts and definitions; Compare, contrast, and integrate concepts and principles; Recognize, interpret, and apply signs, symbols, and terms; and Interpret assumptions and relationships in a variety of settings. Research has solidly established the importance of conceptual understanding in becoming proficient in a subject. When students understand concepts that frame a subject, they are able to use their knowledge flexibly. They combine factual knowledge, procedural knowledge, and conceptual knowledge in powerful ways. Standards in Classroom Practice, McREL, 2002 Research has solidly established the importance of conceptual understanding in becoming proficient in a subject. When students understand concepts that frame a subject, they are able to use their knowledge flexibly. They combine factual knowledge, procedural knowledge, and conceptual knowledge in powerful ways. Standards in Classroom Practice, McREL, 2002

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26 Hey… This looks familiar… Which of the high yield instructional strategies do you see in this structure? Hey… This looks familiar… Which of the high yield instructional strategies do you see in this structure?

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30 WHY ACADEMIC VOCABULARY? Find a 4-second partner  Tell them who you are and one summer joy;  Find 2 seats. Briefly share what you know about photosynthesis. Tell a chain story about the process of photosynthesis… …without using words that begin with: P, L, T, S

31 Research on Imagery as Elaboration 6 37 percentile pts. higher than… …students who kept repeating definitions percentile pts. higher than… …students who were using the terms in a sentence. Students who used imagery to learn vocabulary, on average, performed # of studies

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34 The average student talks 35 seconds a day. The student who is talking is growing dendrites.

35 50 POINTS50 POINTS50 POINTS 100 POINTS 200 POINTS Sara Palin Organizing Theme: Things someone would say… Hillary Clinton Michelle ObamaU.S. Women’s Soccer Team Lady Gaga The Queen of England FAMOUS WOMEN OF 2011 EDITION

36 50 POINTS50 POINTS50 POINTS 100 POINTS 200 POINTS Science Experiment Hypothesis Energy Electron DissolveAtmosphere

37 50 POINTS50 POINTS50 POINTS 100 POINTS 200 POINTS Health/PE Wellness Equipment Body Mass Nutrition EnduranceMovement

38 50 POINTS50 POINTS50 POINTS 100 POINTS 200 POINTS Ways to make.25 Grade 4 Math Things that are parallel perimeter Types of graphs area Types of angles page 9

39 Great Sites for Images

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42 CategoryAve. Effect Size (ES) Percentile Gain Identify similarities & differences Summarizing & note taking Reinforcing effort & providing recognition.8029 Homework & practice.7728 Nonlinguistic representations.7527 Cooperative learning.7327 Setting objectives & providing feedback.6123 Generating & testing hypotheses.6123 Questions, cues, & advance organizers.5922 HIGH-Yield Instructional Strategies

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44 Self-Assessment Tool page 11

45 Kinds of Evidence – Continuum of Evidence Informal Check for Understanding

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50 “A pupil from whom nothing is ever demanded which he cannot do, never does all he can.” John Stuart Mill “No one Rises to Low Expectations.” Carl Boyd

51 CategoryAve. Effect Size (ES) Percentile Gain Identify similarities & differences Summarizing & note taking Reinforcing effort & providing recognition.8029 Homework & practice.7728 Nonlinguistic representations.7527 Cooperative learning.7327 Setting objectives & providing feedback.6123 Generating & testing hypotheses.6123 Questions, cues, & advance organizers.5922 HIGH-Yield Instructional Strategies

52 Georgia Performance Standards Verbs PROBLEM SOLVING PROBLEM SOLVING AnalyzeDeriveDiscoverEvaluateExplore PredictSolveSurveyVerifyInvestigate REASONING REASONING CategorizeClassifyCompareContrastDifferentiate DescribeEstimateExplainGeneralizeInterpret JustifyOrderHypothesizePredictInfer PrioritizeRankValidateSummarize COMMUNICATION COMMUNICATION ClarifyCorrespondDescribeDiscussDemonstrate ExhibitExplainExpressPersuadePortray RestateShowSpeakStateWrite

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56 1.Remember it. (Describe its colors, shapes, and sizes. What does it look like?) 2.Understand it. (What does it make you think of?) 3.Apply it. (What can you do with it? How is it used?) 4.Analyze it. (How is it made or what is it composed of?) 5.Evaluate it. (Take a stand and list reasons for supporting it.) 6.Create it. (Generate a new version of it. How is it an improvement from the original?) CUBING 2010 page 12

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62 Summarizing and Note Taking Generalizations form the research: – Verbatim note-taking is, perhaps, the least effective technique. – Notes should be considered a work in progress. – Notes should be used as a study guide for tests. – The more notes that are taken, the better.

63 C O V E R C O V E R Allow students to personalize their notebook with a cover collage. Preserve with packing tape.

64 Table of Content Samples

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67 MIND Notebook Rubric

68 KEY QUESTION: Why are common assessments so important? “You can enhance or destroy students’ desire to succeed in school more quickly and permanently through your use of assessment than with any other tools you have at your disposal.” Rick Stiggins, Assessment Trainers Institute WHY do we ASSESS: 1. INFORM INSTRUCTIONAL DECISIONS 2. ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO TRY

69 Talk to Me… page 15 – 16

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71 Follow-up Debriefing Each pair should share with your other team members the method you used to graph the figure. Discuss with your team: – Which method appeals to you? – Is there another method that you would prefer? Prepare for a “pairs choice of method” with a new graph.

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73 Key Question Did your performance on the second attempt to complete the grid exercise improve after having an opportunity to self-assess your initial strategy?

74 Formative Assessment Formative assessment is the process used by teachers and students during instruction that provides feedback to adjust teaching and learning for the purpose of improving student learning. Council of Chief State School Officers, October 2006 Notes: Process rather than a particular test…. It is not the nature of the test itself that makes it formative or summative…it is the use to which those results will be put.

75 MOTOR MOUTH

76 Things associated with school Books Report Cards Teachers School Bus Cafeteria Pencils Erasers Things associated with matter Solid Mixture Solutions Atoms Molecules Liquid Gas Things associated with fiction Character Plot Setting Foreshadowing Dialogue Metaphor Theme Things associated with triangles Acute Hypotenuse Obtuse Sides Equilateral Right Angles

77 Reflection (summarizing) What is structure or concept from today’s session that will assist you with your students this year?

78 Thank you for all you do, for all the children! ~Dan


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