Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 1 The Importance of Fluency and Time Spent with Eyes on the Page Teaching the New Frameworks.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 1 The Importance of Fluency and Time Spent with Eyes on the Page Teaching the New Frameworks."— Presentation transcript:

1 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 1 The Importance of Fluency and Time Spent with Eyes on the Page Teaching the New Frameworks

2 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 2 Vocabulary Alphabetic Principle/Phonics Fluency Reading Big Ideas in Beginning Reading Comprehension Phonemic Awareness

3 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 3 Mississippi NAEP Results

4 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 4 Mississippi NAEP Results

5 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 5 NAEP Oral Reading Study

6 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 6 NAEP Oral Reading Study 105 – 129 WPM 80 – 104 WPM 130+ WPM

7 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 7 Fluency Fluency is the ability to read a text quickly, accurately, and with proper expression. - National Reading Panel

8 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 8 Fluency is the ability to read the vast majority of words in a text quickly, accurately, and with proper expression so that meaning is retained. Ultimately, automatic and silent reading is what matters. -National Reading Panel and Elfrieda Hiebert Fluency

9 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 9 Three Components of Fluency Accuracy Rate Prosody--phrasing and expression

10 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 10 Fluency Matters Because: Associated with comprehension-fluent readers are more likely to understand what they read Associated with vocabulary development--the more you read, the more words you learn Which in turn facilitates more comprehension-- knowing more words means new texts are easier to comprehend Facilitates pleasure, making you more likely to read more--the more you read, the easier it is to read, making it more likely for you to read more

11 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 11 The Matthew Effect “For unto every one that hath shall be given, and he shall have abundance: but from him that hath not shall be taken away even that which he hath.” (Matthew XXV:29)

12 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 12 Fluency is NOT a Competency Nor is fluency an objective/benchmark Not easily testable Fluency varies based on type of text, background knowledge, purpose for reading, etc. Fluency is a support--a means by which students become proficient in other areas

13 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 13 MLAF 2006 Third graders should read accurately instructional level materials (texts in which no more than approximately 1 in 10 words are difficult for the reader) with an appropriate reading rate. (A third grader should read between 115 and 140 words per minute by the end of third grade.)

14 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 14 MLAF Fluency Recommendations 1st grade words per minute 2nd grade: words per minute 3rd grade words per minute

15 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 15 Readable Texts Students need to regularly read instructional level texts, that is, texts they are actually able to read.  Scaffold reading in the core program so all students can be successful.  Provide ample opportunities for reading in instructional level texts.  Provide access to instructional level texts for independent reading.

16 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 16 1.Model proficient oral reading Four Ways to Build Reading Fluency

17 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 17 1.Model proficient oral reading 2.Scaffold instruction for students Four Ways to Build Reading Fluency

18 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 18 Scaffolding Instruction for Students May Include Echoic Reading Choral Reading Paired Reading or Partner Reading

19 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 19 The Honeybee Dance One way honeybees communicate with each other is by dancing. Honeybees do a special dance after they find nectar in flowers. Honeybees need nectar to live. When honeybees find nectar, they fly home to tell the other bees where to find the nectar.

20 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 20 Dogs A bark is a sound a dog makes to communicate something to people or other animals. A bark can be a friendly way to say “hi.” Sometimes dogs bark to tell their owners that they see people they do not know. Sometimes dogs bark to scare other dogs. Dogs also communicate by moving their bodies. Dogs show their teeth when they are upset. They wag their tails when they are happy. They wag their tails when their owners give them food. Dogs also wag their tails when their owners take them for walks.

21 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 21 1.Model proficient oral reading 2.Scaffold instruction for students 3.Provide ample practice opportunities Four Ways to Build Reading Fluency

22 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 22 Repeated Reading Reading the same text several times builds fluency Poems and short passages Choral readings Performances Reader’s Theater Reading for pleasure Read and time--keep charts

23 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 23 A Model for Repeated Reading Short, 1-2 minute passages Students read Teacher reads aloud to model fluency Students read again Students write briefly to summarize or answer questions--accountable minutes a day

24 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 24 How Animals Communicate Animals don’t talk, but they do communicate. When you communicate, you give information to others. Animals have ways of communicating that are different from the ways that people use. When your friend talks to you, your friend uses language to communicate information. In a language, each word means something.

25 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 25 1.Model proficient oral reading 2.Scaffold instruction for students 3.Provide ample practice opportunities 4.Encourage the use of phrasing Four Ways to Build Reading Fluency

26 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 26 Modeling and Explicit Teaching Using punctuation and other text features to determine phrasing, prosody Teacher modeling of fluent and choppy reading Remember--speed matters, but comprehension matters more!

27 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 27 Phrasing and Chunking One day at the zoo, Pam and her mother bought a red balloon. Pam held onto the balloon by its string. She enjoyed watching it bounce in the wind. As Pam’s mom paid for their hotdogs, Pam’s balloon slipped out of her hand.

28 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 28 Working with Dialogue Paired Activity for Reading with Expression Additional copies of this activity may be downloaded from the following site:

29 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 29 Time with Eyes on the Page Typical basal programs and literature based programs may minimize time spent reading Avoid round-robin reading or whole- class turn taking Avoid using teacher read aloud only

30 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 30 Increasing Reading Time Read in all subjects Alternatives to whole-class turn taking  Echoic reading  Paired reading  Individual reading  Choral reading Independent Reading Instructionally efficient planning--avoid instructional practices that take a long time with little return

31 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 31 Time with “eyes on the page” Spend time reading--read as much as possible Goal--90 minutes per day of reading-- with “eyes on the page”--at all grades Goal--read 1,000,000 words by the end of third grade Goal--read half a million words a year from 4th grade on

32 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 32 Lesson Planning Activity

33 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 33 Final Thoughts Fluency aids the development of vocabulary and comprehension. Teachers should pay careful attention to building fluency activities into all lessons.

34 April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 34 Think – Pair – Share


Download ppt "April 2007 Copyright © 2007 Mississippi Department of Education 1 The Importance of Fluency and Time Spent with Eyes on the Page Teaching the New Frameworks."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google