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No Child Left Behind. HISTORY President Lyndon B. Johnson signs Elementary and Secondary Education Act, 1965 Title I and ESEA coordinated through Improving.

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Presentation on theme: "No Child Left Behind. HISTORY President Lyndon B. Johnson signs Elementary and Secondary Education Act, 1965 Title I and ESEA coordinated through Improving."— Presentation transcript:

1 No Child Left Behind

2 HISTORY President Lyndon B. Johnson signs Elementary and Secondary Education Act, 1965 Title I and ESEA coordinated through Improving America’s Schools Act, 1994 Reauthorization of ESEA - No Child Left Behind,

3 Close the achievement gap with accountability, flexibility, parental choices, and research-based reforms PURPOSE

4 ALL students will attain proficiency or better in reading and mathematics by ALL limited English students will become proficient in English ALL teachers will be highly qualified by ALL students will be educated in safe, drug-free environments ALL students will graduate from high school GOALS

5 Key Points Accountability Teacher Quality Options and Choices for Parents Instructional Methods Flexibility KEY POINTS

6 Testing Requirements Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Consequences Public Reporting Accountability ACCOUNTABILITY

7 States administer own tests which are: –Aligned –Valid and reliable –Inclusive: Limited English Proficient Students Special Education Students ACCOUNTABILITY Testing Requirements

8 ACCOUNTABILITY Testing Requirements Annual reading and math assessments at grades 3-8 by Science assessments by –At least once at elementary, middle, and high school grades NAEP biennially starting in grades 4 and 8: –Random sampling –Mandatory participation Limited English students must be assessed annually for English language proficiency

9 Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Demonstrate Proficiency: –All schools reach 100% proficiency within 12 years –Schools must meet annual state objectives for progress Continual Achievement: –States will determine annual objectives for progress –All subgroups must meet annual objectives for progress –95% of all students and all subgroups of students must be included in the assessment ACCOUNTABILITY

10 Adequate Yearly Progress - Example % 95% 90% 85% 80% 75% 70% 65% 60% 55% 50% 45% 40% Baseline Target % Target ACCOUNTABILITY

11 Consequences Failure to make AYP will result in implementation of specific consequences Each consecutive year, corrective actions become more intensive

12 Consequences School Improvement Status–First Year (Two consecutive years of not making AYP): –Technical assistance –Must provide public school choice –Two year School Improvement Plan –10% of Title I funds must be allocated for professional development ACCOUNTABILITY

13 Consequences School Improvement Status – Second Year (Three consecutive years of not making AYP): –Continue actions from first year of school improvement status –Provide supplemental services to low-achieving, disadvantaged students At least 5% of Title I funds for this purpose, if needed Supplemental service providers must be approved by the state ACCOUNTABILITY

14 Consequences School Improvement Status - Third Year (Four consecutive years of not making AYP) Corrective Action: –Continue actions from previous years of school improvement –Districts must take at least one of the following actions: Replace relevant school staff Implement a new curriculum and provide professional development Significantly decrease management authority Appoint outside expert to advise on school improvement plan Extend school year or school day Restructure internal organization of school ACCOUNTABILITY

15 Consequences School Improvement Status - Fourth Year (Five consecutive years of not making AYP) Restructuring: –Continue activities from school improvement and corrective action –Districts must take at least one of the following actions: Reopen school as a charter school Replace all or most of relevant school staff Contract with outside entity to operate school State takeover Any other major restructuring of school’s governance that makes fundamental reform ACCOUNTABILITY

16 Consequences–Safe Harbor Provision Schools not meeting annual state objectives can make AYP if: –Percentage of students not proficient for all students and each subgroup is reduced by 10% from the previous year ACCOUNTABILITY

17 Public Reporting State Report Card requirements include: –Dissemination at the beginning of school year –Disaggregated student MEAP data –Comparison of student achievement levels –Percentage of students not tested –Graduation rates –Number and names of schools in need of improvement –Comparison of actual academic achievement to annual objectives for all subgroups –Teacher qualifications ACCOUNTABILITY

18 Public Reporting ACCOUNTABILITY School and District Report Cards must include: –Same information as in State Report Card, applied to the district and individual schools –Comparison of student scores on state assessments with other students within the district and state

19 Public Reporting New requirements to provide parent notification on: –Teacher qualifications –Student performance on state assessments –School choice information –Limited English Proficiency student placement and program information ACCOUNTABILITY

20 Accountability Teacher QualityTeacher Quality Options and Choices for Parents Instructional Methods Flexibility KEY POINTS Key Points

21 Beginning all new Title I teachers must: –Be highly qualified –Be certified and teaching in their content area(s) –Not hold emergency credentials –Have proven competency in teaching areas assigned All core academic subject area teachers not highly qualified must meet the requirements by Title II funds can be earmarked for teacher and principal quality TEACHER QUALITY Teacher Quality

22 All states must: –Develop a plan demonstrating how teachers will become highly qualified by –Require annual increase in the percentage of highly qualified teachers in each local district beginning in –Increase annually the percentage of teachers receiving high quality professional development beginning in * TEACHER QUALITY

23 Teacher Quality –Paraprofessionals hired after January 8, 2002 must meet requirements for qualification standards –Paraprofessionals hired prior to January 8, 2002 must meet requirements for qualifications by January 8, 2006 TEACHER QUALITY

24 Key Points Accountability Teacher Quality Options and Choices for ParentsOptions and Choices for Parents Instructional Methods Flexibility KEY POINTS

25 Options and Choices for Parents All Title I Schools: –Increased parent notification and reporting requirements for all districts –Emphasis on parental involvement School Improvement Status Schools: –Transfer option to schools not identified for improvement –Supplemental services provided outside the school day OPTIONS

26 Key Points Accountability Teacher Quality Options and Choices for Parents Instructional MethodsInstructional Methods Flexibility KEY POINTS

27 Instructional Methods Resources concentrated on scientific, research-based programs Characteristics of scientific research-based studies: –Uses scientific method –Has been replicated –Can be generalized to larger population –Meets rigorous standards –Other studies/programs point to same conclusion METHODS

28 Key Points Accountability Teacher Quality Options and Choices for Parents Instructional Methods FlexibilityFlexibility KEY POINTS

29 Flexibility Legislation allows for flexibility in use of funding –Title I schools attaining AYP Up to 50% of the funds allocated in one or more of the following programs can be transferred among these programs or into Title I, Part A: –Teacher and Principal Training and Recruiting (Title II, Part A) –Enhancing Education Through Technology (Title II, Part D) formula grant only –Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities (Title IV, Part A) –Innovative Programs – (Title V, Part A) FLEXIBILITY

30 Flexibility Schools identified for School Improvement –Up to 30% of funds allocated for Title II, Part A; Title II, Part D; Title IV, Part A; or Title V, Part A may be transferred to support Title I, Part A, school improvement activities FLEXIBILITY

31 Assessment for ALL students Accountability for ALL students Public reporting for ALL schools Increased options for ALL parents Highly qualified personnel in ALL schools Dollars to classrooms in ALL schools SUMMARY

32 Educational Technology (Title II, Part D) Language Instruction for LEP/Immigrant Students (Title III) Safe and Drug Free Schools/Communities (Title IV, Part A) 21 st Century Community Learning Centers (Title IV, Part B) Innovative Programs – State Grants (Title V, Part A) Rural Schools (Title VI) OTHER AREAS

33 KEY DATES Adequate Yearly Progress formula defined Public school options provided, including parental notification in Title I schools with school improvement status All newly hired teachers and paraprofessionals must be highly qualified in Title I schools State will identify supplemental service providers Districts will provide supplemental services in Title I schools in the second year of school improvement status

34 KEY DATES Annual assessment of Limited English Proficient students Biennial NAEP testing in grades 4 and 8 in reading and math States and districts distribute annual report cards based on NCLB requirements Annual assessment in math and reading/language arts at least once in grades 3-5, 6-9, 10-12

35 KEY DATES Districts failing to make AYP for previous 2 years will enter Year 2 School Improvement status Biennial NAEP testing in grades 4 and 8 in reading, math, and science Annual assessments of reading and math in grades 3-8 (fall) All public and charter school teachers must meet standards of high quality States must have science standards established Paraprofessionals hired prior to January 8, 2002 must meet new standards by January 8, 2006

36 KEY DATES Biennial NAEP testing in grades 4 and 8 in reading, math, and writing Current reauthorization ends Annual assessment in science at least once a year in grades 3-5, 6-9, Biennial NAEP testing in grades 4 and 8 in reading, math, and science All students must be proficient in reading and math

37 MDE United States Department of Education NCLB House Committee on Education and the Workforce or (thorough Q&A document) NASDSE (Special Education implications) North Central Regional Educational Laboratory (dates, timelines and policy issues by state) Education Commission of the States questions to: Contact your local Intermediate School District MORE INFORMATION

38 Ingham Intermediate School District Michigan Association of Intermediate Administrators Michigan Department of Education Oakland Schools SPONSORS © September 2002


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