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Success criteria What is it? How important is it? How do we use it in class?

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Presentation on theme: "Success criteria What is it? How important is it? How do we use it in class?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Success criteria What is it? How important is it? How do we use it in class?

2 Success criteria and learning intentions (WALTs) What is the difference between these? Learning Intention (WALT): What will the students be learning? Success Criteria (WILF): What will the students be doing? How will achievement be demonstrated by the students?

3 Success criteria and learning intentions (WALTs) Learning Intention: what they will learn (WALT) know about the structure of the Earth Success criteria: (WILF) how they will learn/do this You should draw and label a diagram to show the structure of the earth name the layers and describe one of these in detail sequence them into the correct order

4 Activity 1 On your piece of paper draw a butterfly.

5 Can you draw a better one?

6 Now try to draw a better butterfly again. This time; Make the butterfly fill half of the page Make sure the pattern is symmetrical Include at least 3 different colours

7 Success criteria… ‘…summarises the key steps or ingredients the student needs in order to fulfil the learning intention – the main things to do, include or focus on.’ Shirley Clarke

8 How important is it? Success criteria can help to: give children exact steps they need to follow to achieve L.I/WALT encourage independent learners allow children to self and peer assess assists teacher in writing next steps marking assist LM when working with a group inform planning for next day

9 Using it in class. Look at these 2 examples, which is better and why?

10 Success criteria should be… Generated by the children (after practise) Put into child friendly language (if teacher is modeling generating S.C.) Constantly referred to during lesson (mini-plenary) Used for peer and self assessment

11 How can pupils/teachers use it? Success criteria; Create a clear definition of a new scientific word you have learnt Put ‘unfamiliar words’ in bold and add them to a glossary later Draw a labeled diagram. Activity 2. What might the child write at the end of their work to self-assess? What might the teacher write to next steps mark?

12 Activity 2. What might the child write at the end of their work to self-assess? “I did give a definition of the new word. I didn’t write the new words in bold.” What might the teacher write to next steps mark? “Well done, you wrote the definition of the new word. Can you underline the new words you have included and write the meaning of these?”

13 How to generate S.C. with children Show a completed example (low or high quality OR both) and ask children to pick out the features.

14 Child generated S.C. (Grade 2) make all your letters the same size use dark colours don’t use yellow put pictures round the edge, not in the middle check that you have copied all words & numbers

15 (Grade 5/6)

16 Child generated S.C. (Grade 5/6) Interesting start to hook reader in Retell events in order Factual information Descriptive detail to engage reader Include specific names Past tense Time connectives Sentence starters

17 Different ways to get children generating S.C. Teacher demonstration of activity while recording down S.C Prove it/doing it wrong (T modelling it incorrectly) Sloppy success criteria A finished product Comparison of two pieces of work Revisiting success criteria

18 Generating S.C. in maths Creating a bar chart Read the tally chart for each category. Count up the number of tallies and record a total at the end of the row. Draw the axes – horizontal for categories, vertical for the scales. Write the scale on the y axis – does it need to go up in 1’s, 2’s, 5’s or 10’s. Label the x axis with the categories. Draw the bars on the graph. Give your graph a title.

19 Generating S.C. in maths. (Subtracting column addition) Write the two numbers down under each other (biggest number is on top, make sure you line up the 100's, 10's and units.) Start by subtracting the units. If the top number is smaller than the bottom number then knock next door and exchange a ten. Borrow the ten and write in the units column. Subtract the two numbers and write the answer underneath. Continue doing this with the tens and hundreds column. Complete the number sentence.

20 Activity 3 Using the examples on your desk, I would like you to; Read through the learning intention (WALT) and context Generate the Success Criteria for that piece of work Create an ‘extension’ success criteria at the end for pupils who need challenging’

21 Examples of success criteria


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