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31508715/0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. BLRs Training Presentations Ergonomics and the Computer Workstation.

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Presentation on theme: "31508715/0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. BLRs Training Presentations Ergonomics and the Computer Workstation."— Presentation transcript:

1 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. BLRs Training Presentations Ergonomics and the Computer Workstation

2 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Why Ergonomics? 1.8 million work- related MSDs each year 600,000 require time away from work to recover Ergonomics prevents MSDs

3 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. What is Ergonomics? Science of fitting the job to the worker Reduces exposure to MSD risk factors Involves engineering and administrative controls

4 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Musculoskeletal Disorder (MSD) Injury or disorder of the nervous system or soft tissue: Muscles Tendons Ligaments Joints Cartilage Blood vessels Nerves

5 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Risk Factors Repetition Force Awkward postures Contact stress Vibration

6 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. MSD Signs and Symptoms You will feel pain or swelling in your: Hands Wrists Fingers Forearms Joints Elbows

7 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. MSD-Related Pain Pain described as: Tightness Stiffness Discomfort Soreness Burning Tingling Coldness Numbness

8 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Outward Signs of MSDs Swelling or inflammation of joints Vigorously shaking hands Urge to massage hands, wrists, or arms Cradling arms

9 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Common MSDs Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Tendinitis Tenosynovitis Thoracic Outlet Syndrome De Quervains Disease Trigger Finger

10 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. MSDs Related to Risk Factors Carpal Tunnel SyndromeRepetition Thoracic Outlet SyndromePosture De Quervains DiseaseForceful grip Trigger Finger Contact stress

11 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Report Symptoms Immediately Report any MSD signs or symptoms immediately Follow your companys reporting procedures Begin medical treatment early Alert your company to risk factors

12 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Computer Workstation: Head and Shoulders Head vertical and facing forward Tilted head puts stress on neck and shoulders Minimize head rotation Shoulders not raised or hunched Arms tucked close to the body Avoid extended reaching

13 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Computer Workstation: Elbows and Wrists Elbows hanging comfortably below the shoulders Not extended outward from the body Not extended forward or backward of the shoulders Wrists in a straight line with the lower arms Hands not flexed up or down Hands not bent inward or outward

14 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Computer Workstation: Legs and Feet Knees bent about 90 degrees Thighs parallel to the floor Chair at comfortable height Remove any obstructions to your legs and feet Feet flat on floor or footrest

15 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Ergonomic Chair: Seat Surface Comfortable Slightly wider than hips/thighs Proper length Adjustable height Adjustable tilt

16 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Ergonomic Chair: Back and Armrest Backrest Angle adjustable Adjustable lumbar support Armrest Broad and cushioned Supports shoulders, elbows and wrists Adjustable height and side-to-side

17 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Computer Monitor Directly in front of you Arms length away Proper height so that your head is level Documents placed close to monitor

18 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Neutral Keyboard Position Elbows close to the body Wrists flat and in line with the forearms Hands not angled up/down or turned in/out No wrist rests when typing

19 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Adjustable Keyboard Height adjustable In a tilting keyboard tray Detachable from the computer monitor Keystroke pressure comfortable for the user

20 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Using a Mouse Control mouse movement from your elbow Wrist straight and neutral Locate mouse properly Use symmetrically shaped and flat mouse

21 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Using a Laptop Computer Occasional users: Sit back in comfortable chair Sacrifice neck posture rather than wrist posture Full-time users: Position screen like a normal workstation monitor Use separate keyboard and mouse like a normal workstation

22 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Break Time Rest break Do a different task Eye break Look away and blink Mini-break Relax your hands

23 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Hand, Wrist, and Shoulder Stretches HandFinger extensions WristBend hands up and down WristBackwards stretch ShoulderShrug and roll your shoulders ShoulderShoulder blade pinch ShoulderOverhead reach

24 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Neck, Back, and Arm Stretches Back/ArmHands behind head Back/ArmBend forward Back/ArmKnee to chest Back/ArmBack bend NeckNod head NeckTurn head NeckTilt head

25 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Focus on Your Posture Elbows at your side, forearms parallel to floor Chair with good back support Close to keyboard, avoid extending Feet flat on floor or footrest Head and neck forward and straight Be comfortable and relaxed

26 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Quiz 1. T or FThe neutral position for elbows is about 4 inches away from your body 2. T or FResting your wrist on a wrist rest promotes good posture 3. T or FA short stretch break should be taken every 30–60 minutes 4. T or F Repetition and awkward posture are risk factors that contribute to MSDs 5. T or F In the neutral position, your feet should be tucked under your chair

27 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Quiz (cont.) 6. T or F Ergonomics is the science of fitting the job to the worker 7. T or FSoreness, tingling, and numbness in your wrist or hands are all symptoms of an MSD 8. T or FRepetitive rotation of your head between your work and your computer results in good exercise and stretching 9. T or FLeaning forward to see the monitor contributes to poor posture 10. T or FA negative-tilt keyboard may help you maintain good wrist posture

28 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Quiz Answers 1.False; the neutral position for your elbows is tucked close to your body 2.False; wrist rests often contribute to poor posture and put pressure on your carpal tunnel 3.True 4.True 5.False; your feet should be flat on the floor or on a footrest

29 /0103 ©2001 Business & Legal Reports, Inc. Quiz Answers (cont.) 6.True 7.True 8.False; your work should be placed next to your monitor to prevent repetitive head rotation 9.True 10.True


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