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1. 2 Table of Contents Introduction and Welcome LetterPage Welcome Letter 3 Faculty and Staff Department Directory 4-5 External Advisory Board 6 Mission.

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Presentation on theme: "1. 2 Table of Contents Introduction and Welcome LetterPage Welcome Letter 3 Faculty and Staff Department Directory 4-5 External Advisory Board 6 Mission."— Presentation transcript:

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2 2 Table of Contents Introduction and Welcome LetterPage Welcome Letter 3 Faculty and Staff Department Directory 4-5 External Advisory Board 6 Mission of Education Department 7 Student Learning Outcomes 7 Purpose 8 Goal 8 Social Justice Integration 8 Our Programs Overview 9 Why Study Education at E-town10-11 Areas of Study12-14 Teacher Certification Program 15 Chapter 354 General Standards 16 Provisional Acceptance 17 Formal Acceptance 18 Domains of Professional Practice / Digication19-30 Clearance Information31-36 PA Dept of Education Testing Requirements Department Checksheets Required English Courses 70 Honors in the Discipline Program 71 Education Course Descriptions The Graduate Program Teacher Dispositions/Foundational competencies Student Teaching and Field Observations 95 Social Justice Opportunities 96 Common Book in Social Justice 97 Student Organizations 98 Steps to Become Certified and Etown and Tips for Students Education Department Forms

3 Welcome to the Department of Education! Dr. Rachel Finley-Bowman, Education Department Chair Welcome to the Education Department at Elizabethtown College and to your first step in becoming the educators and school leaders of tomorrow! You are beginning an exciting journey, and this manual is designed to help you navigate the curriculum and assessment requirements for teacher certification in the state of Pennsylvania. A major in education at Elizabethtown is a demanding undertaking. Students must excel in challenging coursework in pedagogy, learning theory, cognition, and liberal arts content. They must repeatedly demonstrate competency in field placement classrooms by working with a variety of students and student needs. They must exhibit the dispositions of a professional educator as defined by the PA Code of Conduct and the departments Teacher Dispositions Policy. Finally, students must pass required state assessments (PRAXIS, PAPA, PECT) and complete a professional portfolio for certification. The Teacher Preparation Program at Elizabethtown College has a unique focus supported by four pillars – Professionalism (as defined by Danielsons Domains), Social Justice, Undergraduate Research, and Theory into Practice. These pillars are realized through the curriculum, field experiences, research and service-learning projects with faculty mentors, co-curricular organizations and activities, and invited speaker and film series, and they expose pre-service teachers to the real issues and educational policies of the twenty-first century classroom. Departmental faculty and staff want you to begin your career at Elizabethtown with a clear understanding of these expectations and responsibilities for your chosen certification program – Early Childhood (Pre-K to 4), Middle Level (4 to 8), Secondary (7-12), or K-12 (Music, Spanish, Art, and Special Education. We also invite you to consider the option of enrolling in the new 5-year Masters Program in Special Education which offers dual certification in a general area and special education in either grades PreK-8 or If you encounter policies or procedures that you do not understand, please consult us immediately. This manual is also available on the departments website. Regards, Dr. Rachel Finley-Bowman Chair, Education Department 3

4 4 Teacher Education Faculty and Staff Education Department Office Nicarry Dr. Rachel Finley-Bowman, Dept. Chair Associate Professor of Social Studies Education Nicarry Ms. Johanna Shafer Department Administrative Assistant Nicarry Dr. Kathy Blouch Assistant Professor of Science Education Nicarry Dr. Elizabeth Coyle Associate Professor of Education Nicarry Mrs. Diane DeArment Director of Clinical Experiences & Certification Officer Nicarry Mr. Doug Fisher Adjunct Faculty Nicarry Dr. Shannon Haley-Mize Assistant Professor of Education Nicarry Dr. Eugenia Krimmel Adjunct Faculty Nicarry Dr. Charla N Lorenzen Asst Prof of Modern Languages Wenger Center, Spanish Education Dr. Don Myers Lecturer in Education Nicarry Dr. Susan Pitcher Associate Professor of Education Nicarry Professor Wendy Bellew Lecturer in Education Nicarry Dr. Kevin T Shorner-Johnson Asst Prof of Music Education Zug Memorial Hall, Music Education Dr. Matthew G Skillen Assistant Professor of English Director of English Education Wenger Center, English Education Dr. Stephen R Soltys Asst Prof of Mathematics Ed Esbenshade, 384E Math Education Dr. Juan Toro Associate Professor of Education Nicarry Dr. Carroll Tyminski Associate Professor of Education Nicarry

5 5 Dr. Kristen Waughen Adjunct Faculty Esbenshade 284C Professor James Wile Lecturer in Education and Mathematical Sciences Nicarry 102A Mrs. Dana Wendling Administrative Assistant, Clinical Experiences Nicarry 102B Dr. Stacy Winslow Adjunct Faculty Nicarry Ms. Wendy Martin Science Education Outreach Director Nicarry (office) (mobile) Ms. Marianne Calenda Dean of Students Baugher Student Center, Dr. E. Fletcher McClellan Dean of the Faculty Alpha Hall, Dr. Elizabeth A Rider Assoc Academic Dean/Registrar High Library, Room Teacher Education Faculty and Staff

6 6 Mr. Bradley Miller Second Grade Teacher Landisville Primary Center Hempfield School District Mrs. Melissa Elliott Second Grade Teacher East High Elementary School Elizabethtown Area School District Mrs. Julie Shar Primary Multiage Teacher Rheems Elementary School Elizabethtown Area School District Dr. Donald Myers Lecturer in Education Supervisor, Student Placements Department of Education Elizabethtown College Dr. Stacy Winslow, Ed. D Principal, Hershey Middle School Derry Township School District Dr. Rachel Finley-Bowman Chair, Department of Education Associate Professor Department of Education Mrs. Amanda Hann Principal, Rheems Elementary School Elizabethtown Area School District Ms. Johanna Shafer Administrative Assistant Department of Education Elizabethtown College Mr. Donald Gillett Principal, Wrightsville Elementary School Elizabethtown Area School District Mrs. Wendy Bellew Lecturer in Education Department of Education Elizabethtown College Mrs. Janell Craun Second Grade Teacher Cornwall Elementary School Cornwall Lebanon School District Mrs. Diane DeArment Director, Clinical Experiences Department of Education Elizabethtown College Mr. Richard Schwarzman Assistant to the Superintendent for Secondary Education Elizabethtown Area School District Mr. Ryan Billet Principal, Stony Brook Elementary School Central York School District Department of Education External Advisory Board Mission Statement: Through program assessment, powerful curriculum development, and the cultivation of professional relationships with stakeholders in our field placement schools and districts, the Elizabethtown College Department of Education External Advisory Board is an organization of educators, administrators, college faculty, and staff who are committed to the continued growth and success of our pre-service teachers.

7 The mission of the Education Department at Elizabethtown College is to provide its students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become thoughtful and responsible teachers who, informed by scholarship and research, are prepared to meet the social, intellectual, and professional challenges of today's culturally diverse and inclusive pre-K to 12 classrooms. Mission Statement The Education Department requires that every student demonstrate the following: A thorough knowledge of the content and pedagogical skills in planning, preparation, and assessment. An ability to establish and maintain a purposeful and equitable environment for learning. An ability to deliver instruction that engages students in learning by using a variety of instructional strategies, including technology. Qualities and dispositions that characterize a professional person in aspects that occur in and beyond the classroom/building. An awareness of, and adherence to, the professional, ethical, and legal responsibilities of being a certified teacher. An ongoing commitment to lifelong learning and professional development through field-related clubs, conferences, and organizations. Teaching and advocacy for principles of social justice and civic competence. Student Learning Outcomes 7

8 Purpose: We believe that our purpose is best achieved through adherence to the Pennsylvania Department of Education standards for teacher certification, and through modeling research-based practices of effective instruction and assessment within a relationship- centered climate that supports academic excellence. Goal: Our goal is to prepare highly competent, knowledgeable educators in early childhood, elementary middle, secondary, special, art, music, and Spanish education. Essential components of this preparation are early and frequent field experiences in urban, rural, and suburban settings supervised by certified professionals, and ongoing self-evaluation of knowledge and skill growth through development of a professional portfolio. The capstone assessment is a semester-long student teaching placement that promotes the practical application of theories and best practices learned in program coursework. Social Justice Integration: Integral to our programs is the department's signature attribute of social justice, exhibited through a curricular focus upon advocacy for equity, civic engagement, global citizenship, and international/comparative perspectives. Education faculty are experts in these fields, conducting, presenting, and publishing their own research, and facilitating opportunities for undergraduate scholarship. 8

9 Our Programs: Program Home Department Type of Certification Early Childhood Education, B.S. Ed.EducationPre K-4 Early Childhood w/ Special Education, B.S. Ed*Education Gen Ed- Pre K-4 SPED- Pre K-8 Elementary/ Middle Level Language w/Special Education B.S. Ed* Education Lang- 4-8 SPED- Pre K-8 Middle Level Science, B.S Ed.Education4-8 Middle Level Social Studies, B.S. Ed.Education4-8 Middle Level Math, B.S. EdEducation4-8 Secondary Biology, B.S. Ed.Biology7-12 Secondary Chemistry, B.S. Ed Chemistry and Biochemistry 7-12 Secondary English, B.A., English EdEnglish7-12 Secondary Math, B.S., Math EdMathematical Sciences7-12 Secondary Social Studies, B.S., Social Studies Ed Education 7-12 Secondary Gen Science B.S., Ed Education 7-12 Secondary Physics, B.S., Physics EdPhysics and Engineering7-12 Music Education, B.M. Fine and Performing Arts K-12 Music Education Art Education, B.S. Ed. Fine and Performing ArtsFine and Performing Arts K-12 Art Education Modern Languages- Spanish Education, B.A. Spanish with K-12 Education Certification Modern LanguagesK-12 Spanish Education 4+1 Masters Degree in Special Education, M. Ed.EducationMasters SPED PreK-8, * First-Year students entering Elizabethtown College Fall 2013 can declare the four-year Special Education Certification Program up until May 1st, Otherwise, they are required to complete the MEd Special Education 4+1 Program. NO EXCEPTIONS.

10 10 Why Study at Elizabethtown: Hallmarks of our Program Why Study at Elizabethtown: Hallmarks of our Program Field placements in each year of study in a variety of settings As an education major at Elizabethtown College, you begin classroom observations in your first year. You will be exposed to a variety of school settings: suburban, urban and rural. Access to full-time clinical coordinator Field placements are an important part of your educational experience at E-town. You won't have to worry about securing your own placement locations; we do it for you! Middle-level certification areas Elizabethtown College was one of the first colleges in Pennsylvania to receive middle-level accreditation. We offer courses leading to certification in science, mathematics, social studies, and English/ language arts/reading. Frequency of student-teaching observations by field supervisors Your time as an Education major culminates with your student-teaching experience. You will be fully supported by a dedicated field supervisor who will make frequent observations to your classroom.

11 11 Student research and scholarship opportunities Student scholarship is alive at Elizabethtown College. As an education major, you will have research opportunities including Honors in the Discipline or participation in the College's annual Scholarship and Creative Arts Day as well as the opportunity to present at professional conferences in your specialty discipline. Learn from accomplished faculty committed to scholarship and mentoring All Elizabethtown College courses are taught by committed faculty members. Integration of social justice throughout coursework Our department embraces the mission and educational philosophies of the Elizabethtown College's in many ways, including implementing values of social justice into the curriculum Student interest in civic engagement opportunities The Education Department at E-town College encourages our majors to get involved in the community. Tutoring and reading to children at local libraries and community centers is just one example of how you can give back while cultivating your classroom skills. Why Study at Elizabethtown: Hallmarks of our Program Why Study at Elizabethtown: Hallmarks of our Program Graduate Study in Special Education – The Department offers a unique 4+1 Masters program in special education which provides candidates with two full semesters of student teaching and prepares them to be highly qualified in a general certification area and PreK-8 or 7-12 special education.

12 Areas of Study The Department of Education at Elizabethtown College has a tradition of successfully preparing teacher candidates who graduate, obtain Pennsylvania State Teacher certification and go on to secure teaching positions in Pennsylvania and surrounding states. We provide students with an opportunity to pursue the following majors: Early Childhood Education Elementary/ Middle Level Secondary Education Special Education* (Please see the Masters Program on Page 80) Candidates for certification in Early Childhood Education must complete a major that consists of two key elements. The first element emphasizes critical concepts and ideas important to ones general education and academic preparation for teaching. The second emphasis stresses a professional core organized in five areas: Early Childhood Development, Cognition and Learning Subject Matter Pedagogy Content (Pre-K through 4); Assessment Family and Community Partnerships Professionalism Early Childhood Education Pre-K through 4th grade Early Childhood Education Pre-K through 4th grade 12

13 Elementary/Middle Level Education 4th through 8th grade Elementary/Middle Level Education 4th through 8th grade Candidates for certification in Elementary/Middle Level Education must select an emphasis in one of four academic content areas and be a generalist in each of the other three academic content areas. The academic emphasis requires completion of a minimum of 30 credit hours in one of the following four content areas: 1) Mathematics, 2) Science, 3) English/Language Arts and Reading, or 4) Social Studies. In addition to the one academic emphasis, candidates also are expected to generalize in the remaining three content areas by completing 12 credit hours in each. Students also complete a professional core organized into five areas: 1)Early Adolescent and Adolescent Development, Cognition and Learning; 2)Subject Matter Pedagogy Content (Grades Four through Eight); 3) Assessment; 4) Family and Community Partnerships; 5) Professionalism. Content requirements are based on national standards for Elementary/Middle Level Education as well as Pennsylvania's curriculum standards. Candidates will have 190 hours of field experiences prior to student teaching. 13

14 Secondary Education Programs in Secondary Education are available in select academic areas including: Biology Chemistry English Mathematics Physics Special interdisciplinary programs in: Social Studies General Science Majors and Pennsylvania certification for kindergarten through 12th grade are also available in : Music Fine Arts-Art Modern Languages-Spanish Carefully designed work in the academic or interdisciplinary major, the Core program and electives qualify students for a degree appropriate to that major and for Pennsylvania certification. For specific requirements for these programs, refer to Catalog sections relating to the primary major or to the interdisciplinary section for the two interdisciplinary programs. 14

15 15 As part of its general requirements for majors and/or certification, the Education Department expects students to make application into the Teacher Certification Program. This begins with Provisional Acceptance( routinely this is done as a first-year student) and this is followed by Formal Acceptance. (routinely this is done as a sophomore student). On the following pages you will find information on the specific requirements for Provisional Acceptance followed by specific information for Formal Acceptance as well as information on all required clearances. The programs at Elizabethtown College are accredited through the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) and are governed by the General Standards of Chapter 354 of the Pennsylvania Code. Teacher Certification Program

16 16 Chapter 354 General Standards I. MISSION - The professional educator programs shall have a cooperatively developed mission statement that is based on the needs of the professional educator candidates, public school entities and their students, and consistent with the design of the programs. (354.21) (49.14(4)(i) II. ASSESSMENT [REPORTING] – The preparing institution shall submit an annual systematic report and a biennial report on candidates and demonstrate that the results are used to modify and improve the professional education programs. (354.22) (49.14(4)(vii)(x) III. ADMISSIONS – The preparing institution shall document that its procedure for admitting applicants into its professional education programs confirms that they have met the course, credit and grade point average or alternative admissions requirements. (354.23) (354.31) (49.14(4)(v) IV. DESIGN - The preparing institution shall document that the academic content courses for initial preparation programs culminating in a bachelors degree or higher shall be the same as a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science Degree and shall also include all required electives in the content area that the candidates plan to teach or serve and allow completion in four years. (354.24) (49.14(4)(iii) V. FIELD EXPERIENCES – The preparing institution shall document that candidates complete a planned sequence of professional education courses and field experiences that integrate academic and professional education content with actual practice in classrooms and schools to create meaningful learning experiences for all students. (354.25)(354.26)(49.14(4)(iv)(viii) VI. STUDENT TEACHING – The preparing institution shall document that candidates for initial Instructional I certification complete a 12-week full-time student-teaching experience under the supervision of qualified program faculty and cooperating teachers. (354.25) (49.14(4)(ii)) VII. COLLABORATION – The preparing institution shall document that higher education faculty, public school personnel, and other members of the professional education community collaborate to design, deliver, and facilitate effective programs for the preparation of professional educators and to improve the quality of education in schools. (354.25) (354.41) (49.14(4)(ix) VIII. ADVISING & MONITORING - The preparing institution shall document its procedure for recruiting and advising students, systematically monitoring their progress, and assessing their competence to begin their professional roles upon completion of the program. (354.32) (354.33) (49.14(4)(vi)) IX. EXIT CRITERIA – The preparing institution shall have a published set of criteria and competencies for exit from each professional education program, that are based on the PA Academic Standards, Specific Program Guidelines and the learning principles for each certificate category. (354.33) (49.14(4)(iii) X. FACULTY - The preparing institution shall provide systematic and comprehensive activities to assess and enhance the competence, intellectual vitality and diversity of the faculty. (354.41)

17 17 Provisional Acceptance Students must apply for Provisional Acceptance when the following specific application requirements occur: You have completed at least 27 credit hours You have completed at least two courses with Education prefixes (ED 105 & ED 150 or ED151) You have a cumulative (overall) GPA of at least 2.8 You have a grade of C or better in all courses with Education prefixes You must be a declared education major You have submitted a student life clearance (complete the top portion only and bring to Nicarry 143) You must submit a professional e-portfolio which includes the following information: One picture of yourself Resume Educational Philosophy Dates of your clearances and TB test PAPA Scores (if you have already taken them, please include your scores) Description of your experience working with children Sample of your writing (Educational philosophy may be used for this or something such as an article review, lit review, etc) Other items you wish to present in support of your application Application for Provisional Acceptance into the teacher certification program is routinely done as a first-year student during the semester that you will complete both ED 105 &150 or ED151 (typically during Spring semester of your first year)

18 18 Students must apply for formal acceptance when the following specific application requirements occur: You have completed at least 54 credit hours You have completed at least 3 courses with education prefixes You have completed 2 math courses and two English courses (one writing composition and one literature) Overall GPA of at least 3.0 Proof of an updated TB test (no older than 1 year) Up to date criminal clearances (no older than 1 year) Passing scores for the PAPA tests The professional e-portfolio which includes updated: One picture of yourself Updated resume Dates of your clearances and TB test PAPA scores (if you have taken the tests and are awaiting your scores, please note that on your portfolio) Educational Philosophy Description of your experience working with children Sample of your writing Other items you wish to present in support of your application Student life clearance - previous clearance will be checked by the department for any recent disciplinary issues. You do NOT need to sign another student life clearance. Formal Acceptance Application for Formal Acceptance into the Teacher Certification program is routinely done as a sophomore student after completing at least 3 education courses (typically during spring of your sophomore year ).

19 19 The Domains of Professional Practice The Danielson Framework The Professional Portfolio The Domains of Professional Practice The Danielson Framework The Professional Portfolio

20 20 The Domains of Professional Practice- The Danielson Framework The Professional Portfolio The Domains of Professional Practice- The Danielson Framework The Professional Portfolio Domain 1: Planning and Preparation 1a Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy 1b Demonstrating Knowledge of Students 1c Setting Instructional Outcomes 1d Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources 1e Designing Coherent Instruction 1f Designing Student Assessments Domain 2: Classroom Environment 2a Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport 2b Establishing a Culture for Learning 2c Managing Classroom Procedures 2d Managing Student Behavior 2e Organizing Physical Space Domain 3: Instruction 3a Communicating With Students 3b Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques 3c Engaging Students in Learning 3d Using Assessment in Instruction 3e Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities 4a Reflecting on Teaching 4b Maintaining Accurate Records 4c Communicating with Families 4d Participating in a Professional Community 4e Growing and Developing Professionally 4f Showing Professionalism All education majors are required to complete a portfolio which assesses and documents their growth as professionals during their capstone student teaching experience. Beginning in the freshmen year, students are introduced to the concept of the portfolio, and artifacts are collected from pertinent content courses, education courses, and field placements. During the junior methods placement, students will assemble their first complete portfolio using a traditional binder format. In the senior year, this portfolio is transferred to an electronic version (using Digication software). Students are also required to assemble a companion portfolio brochure which emphasizes their very best work. The portfolio is to be organized according to Charlotte Danielson s Four Domains of Professional Practice: The professional portfolio is a clear expression of a student s educational philosophy, showcasing his/her progress as a pre-service teacher. Portfolio development is a PROCESS; students never really finish this project, but continually update and revise the document as they grow and evolve in the profession. It is expected that the portfolio will be organized (table of contents, etc.), neat, and professional. Creativity is absolutely encouraged (color, graphics, and pictures), but students should refrain from making it cute or appear as a scrapbook. Your portfolio is an earnest and insightful statement of your work as a teacher.

21 21 Recommended Portfolio Contents Table of Contents Provide a quick overview of portfolio organization Artifacts to Reflect Four Domains Select artifacts that best demonstrate how you have met each the domain standard. Strive for QUALITY, not quantity! Reflections Artifacts illustrate your accomplishments but they do not speak for themselves. Reflections explain your rationale for choosing a particular artifact to highlight your knowledge, experiences, achievements, and beliefs about teaching. Students must justify why their chosen artifacts satisfy each domain using reflective essays or passages. Directly address the domain and the standard(s). Briefly describe artifact in relation to the event or activity Analyze the significance of the artifact. Explain how you were impacted by this experience. State why you included specific artifacts in your portfolio. This could be a separate section to introduce the domain, or several paragraphs throughout the domain which accompany each artifact. Describe what you learned and explain the outcome of the experience. (Were you surprised by what you learned; was outcome intended or unintended? What insights were gained in this experience?) Ideas to consider for Portfolio Reflections: How and why was this artifact meaningful? Is this artifact the best representation of my knowledge? What does this artifact communicate about my skills? Why this artifact is a good representation of a particular standard? What did you learn; or how did you grow professionally? Tips and Reminders: Make the portfolio neat, organized, and visually appealing. Be sure to cover the entire grade range of your certificate (K-12, 7-12, 4-8, PreK-4) and all pertinent content areas. Highlight minors or other relevant areas of study. Highlight what sets you apart (study abroad, unique internships, undergraduate research) Captions/headlines/titles to explain artifacts are useful. Highlight diverse experiences, showing your ability to work in multiple environments with various responsibilities. Include pictures of your room, bulletin boards, you in action, and the like. The portfolio reflects who you are as a teacher. Think about how this document distinguishes you from other job applicants. Think quality!!

22 22 The Framework for Teaching The Elizabethtown College Department of Education uses the Danielson Framework because it most closely aligns with our mission and constructivist vision of teaching and learning. As described by Danielson, the framework is meant to be the foundation for professional conversations among practitioners who seek to enhance their skills and become more thoughtful about the complex task of teaching. (Danielson, 2011) College faculty use the framework to generate and sustain such conversations as they guide pre- service teachers towards program completion. The framework also serves as a common assessment of general student progress in the major. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has also adopted Danielsons Framework as the overarching vision for effective instruction. Beginning July 1, 2013, in-service teachers will be assessed using the four domains as the foundation of the Teacher Effectiveness System. For more information, please see

23 23 WHAT IS DIGICATION? Digication is an online e-Portfolio tool for showcasing work and achievements. Digication makes it easy for teachers and students to create and share their professional e-Portfolios. What is an e-Portfolio? As stated previously, portfolios are platforms for students, teachers, alumni, and professionals to showcase their work and ideas. They are archives of learning, discovery, progress, achievement and reflection. A few uses of e- portfolios include assessment, admissions, interactive resumes, student galleries, teacher resource sites, collaborative project portfolios, and research presentations.

24 24 Login Directions: Go to Choose the Current Students gateway Look under Services and click on e-Portfolio Login using your as Username and XXXXX as the password. How to create your Portfolio

25 25 Click on CREATE to create a new portfolio To create a new Portfolio: Enter the title of your e-portfolio in this manner : Last name, first name_ EDProvisional (3 underscores)

26 26 Choose More Templates to see templates that are not listed automatically. Click here to use the Education departments predesigned template

27 27

28 28 This area is referred to as the pages. You will know which page you are on by looking for the underlined text. This area is referred to as sections. You will know which section you are in looking at by the underlined text.

29 29

30 30 SAMPLE Department of Education Acceptance Acknowledgement Form Due to the Education Office by April 22, 2013 I have received, read and understand the above information concerning my acceptance into the Education Department. I have discussed this with my Advisor. I understand that my acceptance is not active until all signatures are received and this form is returned to the Education Department office. Failure to submit this form with all signatures on it, may result in my acceptance not being active. My advisor has received and read the information as well. A copy of this letter will be placed in my permanent student file in the Education Office. _________________________________________________ Student SignatureAdvisor Signature ________________________________Date *Please note: Acceptance is not active until this acknowledgement form has been signed by the student and their advisor and returned to the Education Office, Nicarry 143, for the Department Chair to sign. * ____________________________ Chair, Education Department _________________ Date

31 31 Clearances For all students that will be in a field placement, clearances must be updated each year. If a student studies abroad or does not have a placement for a particular semester their clearances must be updated and made current prior to beginning a new placement. TB Test Criminal Clearances Valid for one year. A copy of your new TB test results should be brought to the Education office in Nicarry 143 to be placed in your file. The health center administers TB tests at a nominal cost. You must schedule an appointment for this service by calling Tests may also be administered by your family doctor but results must be sent to you at school so the education department can make a copy of the test results. You will need to apply for and have proof of valid criminal record clearances prior to taking ED105. Submit copies to the Education office in Nicarry 143. Original criminal clearances are YOUR responsibility and should be stored where you can access them on campus. School districts require seeing the original criminal clearances at the start of a field placement, so take your clearances with you the first week of ALL field placements.

32 32 Criminal Clearances All clearances are required for admission to the Colleges teacher education program (regardless of your state of residence) and for accepting a position in a Pennsylvania school. Criminal clearance forms and directions to process these clearances can always be picked up in the Education Office, Nicarry 143. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania requires four separate clearances for teacher candidates : PA State Police Criminal Record Check, (Act 34) PA Child Abuse History clearance (Act 151) FBI Criminal History Report* (fingerprints) (Act 114) ACT 24 – 6004 Arrest/Conviction Form (you will sign this and submit to the Education department. You will not need a copy of this) As you receive your criminal clearances, bring a copy of each clearance to the Education Office, Nicarry 143. We need a copy of all clearances for your file. Lack of clearances will prohibit you from starting any field placement. Always bring your original clearances with you the first day of any field placement and present them to the school office. School districts also require that the Education Department of Elizabethtown College has verification of your criminal clearances on file before you start any field placement. Original criminal clearances are YOUR responsibility and should be stored where you can access them on campus. You are required to update your Criminal Record Check, PA Child Abuse, FBI Criminal History and TB Test clearances on a yearly basis. Please keep track of the dates on your clearances and update them when they expire each year. Always bring copies of updated clearances to Nicarry 143( Ms.Shafer) or Nicarry 142 (Mrs. DeArment) so we can update your file.

33 33 Specific Instructions 1. Using Internet Explorer - go to (no need to type in www) 2. Click on Submit a New Record Check 3. Enter Education in REASON FOR REQUEST 4. Enter Personal Information (Do not include periods, dashes or commas in the address field) 5. Verify that all information is correct 6. On Record Check Request Form enter the information regarding who the record check is for. (This may be the same information as the Personal Information page) (Do not include dashes or spaces in the Social Security line.) 7. Press Enter this request and then Press Finished 8. Review Record Check Request then press Submit 9. Enter your Credit Card information. (Do not include spaces or dashes in the Credit Card number line.) 10. You will be given the option to print your Criminal Record Check as long as you do not have a record. Be sure to have a printer available to print. 11. Be sure to click on the hyperlink that reads Certification Form 12. Print two copies and bring one copy of the Criminal Record Check to Nicarry 143 for your file. You will keep the other copy. For questions regarding this website call toll-free , option 2 PA State Police CRIMINAL RECORD CHECK (ACT 34) : ONLINE INSTRUCTIONS (using a Credit Card) PA State Police CRIMINAL RECORD CHECK (ACT 34) : ONLINE INSTRUCTIONS (using a Credit Card)

34 34 Mail to: Pennsylvania State Police Central Repository Elmerton Avenue Harrisburg, PA Approximately six weeks are required to process these requests. To check on the status of your SP4-164 Criminal Record Check, you may call after 4 weeks PA State Police Criminal Record Check (ACT 34) (SP4-164) Mail- In instructions Be advised, this method can take up to 8 weeks to process!! PA State Police Criminal Record Check (ACT 34) (SP4-164) Mail- In instructions Be advised, this method can take up to 8 weeks to process!! 1. Use the request form provided with these directions. 2. Fill in your name as requester, home address, and phone number – Exact information 3. Check the following box for Requester information Individual/Noncriminal Justice Agency: 4. Fill in your name for Name/Subject of record check 5. List any aliases or other names you have used, including maiden name 6. Fill in your Social Security Number – Verify its the correct number 7. Indicate your date of birth, sex, and race 8. For reason for request, check the box for Education 9. Include a $10.00 money order or certified check payable to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (personal checks and cash will not be accepted).

35 35 PA Child Abuse History Clearance Form and Instructions (ACT 151) Type or print clearly and neatly in ink Section I only. Address must be Applicant's current home address. All information must be completed in full. ( The form asks for all previous names, addresses, and household members since 1975). This information must be provided to the best of your knowledge and belief. Application must be signed. Enclose a $10.00 money order for each application. No cash or personal checks accepted. Money orders can be purchased at any Turkey Hill Store, Giant Store, your local bank or most convenience stores in PA. Do not send any postage paid return envelopes. Application should be placed in a business-sized or larger envelope prior to mailing. One block must be checked for Purpose for Clearance. Do not check more than one block. Check the School Employee Block if seeking to have involvement within a school (public, private vocational, technical, nursing) for any reason. You do have the option of Driving directly to the Child Abuse Background check site. The building is in Harrisburg (less than an hour drive).Driving there directly will cut back on your wait time. Wait time at the Site is 15 minutes as opposed to 4 weeks via mailing the form in. Directions to the Child Background Building: 283 W to 283N to 83 N 83 N to 81 S Take Exit 69 Progress Avenue and bear right to go South on Progress Avenue At 2 nd light, make a right onto Elmerton Avenue (CVS is on the right) Continue on Elmerton Avenue, at 2 nd light make a left onto Sycamore Drive Continue on Sycamore drive until you get to a BIG speed bump After the speed bump you will see a big, red brick building on the right. Parking lot is on the left. You can park anywhere in the lot. Walk across Sycamore to the brick building (53 Hillcrest). Inside the entrance there is a phone on the wall. You want the phone number that is for the Child Background Check. They are open 8:30 am – 11:45 am and 1 pm – 4:45 pm Mondays thru Fridays. Clearance results will be mailed to you within 14 days from the date that the clearance application is received. There will be no replacements after 90 days. Failure to comply with the above instructions will cause considerable delay. Please contact the following for applicable criminal history requests and status: PA Child Abuse Form: (717) option #4

36 36 HOW TO OBTAIN MY FBI CRIMINAL HISTORY REPORT After you have been fingerprinted, you must or bring your Registration ID number (PAE number) to the Education Department, Nicarry 143. The Education Department needs this number to pull your clearance from a portal and to verify that you have obtained this clearance. HOW TO OBTAIN MY FBI CRIMINAL HISTORY REPORT After you have been fingerprinted, you must or bring your Registration ID number (PAE number) to the Education Department, Nicarry 143. The Education Department needs this number to pull your clearance from a portal and to verify that you have obtained this clearance. GO TO and click on Pennsylvania Department of Education- PDEwww.pa.cogentid.com A. Registration -Go to Register Online (on right hand side) -Select payment (credit card OR money order) -Complete registration page -Reason fingerprinted: Select College/University -We recommend you use your permanent address, not your college address -Print your Registration Complete Page (You will need this number later) B. Payment If you pay with credit card : -Enter credit card information -Print (or write down) your Registration ID number (The Education Department needs this number, which begins with PAE, to retrieve your clearance from our portal.) -If you cannot pay by credit card, bring a Money Order for $28.75 when you go to the fingerprint site. NO Cash or Personal Checks are accepted. C. Fingerprinting -Go to for the location nearest you – ONLY IN PAwww.pa.cogentid.com -When you go, bring with you: -Your Registration ID Number and Payment Confirmation Number - A Photo ID – One or more of the following is allowable: -Drivers License or College Issued ID or US Passport - A Money Order for $28.75 IF you did not pay online with a credit card Be sure you know your Social Security Number! (Try not to have any cuts on any of your fingers) D. or bring in your Registration ID number (PAE number) to the Education Department, Nicarry to Ms. Shafer The Education Department needs this number to pull your clearance and verify that you have obtained this E. You will receive the unofficial copy in the mail within 3-4 weeks *If you do not receive your clearance in the mail, call within 30 days THE FINGERPRINT SITE CLOSEST TO ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE IS: UPS Store #3413 Stone Mill Plaza 1390 Columbia Ave. Lancaster, PA Hours: 9 am – 5 pm Monday thru Friday; 9 am – 3 pm Saturday

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38 38 Pre-service Academic Performance Assessment (PAPA) PDE Testing Requirements* (*Note: ALL Education Majors – Begin with these tests.) Beginning in April 2012, the Pre-service Academic Performance Assessment (PAPA) will be the means of assessing reading, mathematics, and writing skills for undergraduate candidates seeking a state-approved Pennsylvania educator preparation Instructional I certificate. All undergraduate candidates for initial certification will be required to pass the PAPA as well as the test corresponding to their specific certification area. PAPA information and registration can be found at PAPA is offered through PEARSON. These exams are delivered as computer-based tests. Each assessment includes multiple modules, each with its own qualifying score. Modules consist of selected-response questions and, for the PAPA, constructed-response assignments to assess candidates' knowledge and skills based on the test objectives. Pre-service Academic Performance Assessment (PAPA) The PAPA includes three modules: Reading, Mathematics, and Writing. To pass the PAPA, examinees must take and meet the qualifying scores of all three modules. Format Selected-response items and constructed-response assignments Reading: 40 selected-response items Mathematics: 40 selected-response items Writing: 40 selected-response items, 2 sentence correction assignments, and 1 extended-response assignment Time Reading: 45 minutes Mathematics: 60 minutes Writing: 75 minutes Examinees will also have 15 minutes for a computer-based testing tutorial. Test Dates By appointment, year round. Test appointments are available on a first-come, first- served basis. Test Sites CBT sites are located in Pennsylvania, nationwide, and in Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and Canada. Locate test center.Locate test center Qualifying Score Performance criterion (cut score): 220 per module For information about qualifying scores, visit Reference Materials Provided for this Test A formulas page will be available during the Mathematics module. Review it now. A standard on-screen calculator will be available during the Mathematics module. Review a calculator tutorial now.Review it now Review a calculator tutorial now Test Fee $37 per module; $89 for all three modules. Review test fee and payment information.Review test fee and payment information Score Reporting Test results for the Reading and Mathematics modules are provided at the test center at the conclusion of your test session. Score reports for the Reading and Mathematics modules are available within 10 days after testing. Score reports for the Writing module are available within 20 business days after testing. Testing Policies When you register, you must agree to abide by all testing rules and policies. Read them now.Read them now Prepare View the preparation materials available for this testView the preparation materials available for this test.

39 39 Composite Score Option for PAPA: The Composite Scoring Option for PAPA was initiated to enable a candidate who may excel in one area such as mathematics, but who is not strong in another PAPA area, to receive a passing score on the PAPA series. In order to qualify, a candidate must meet a minimum score in each test area (Mathematics, Reading and Writing) and then exceed the passing score by an amount equal to the Standard Error of Measurement in one or two of the other test areas. The candidates test scores are added together, and if the scores total 686, the candidate has passed the PAPA series. The Minimum Scores required for the Composite Scoring Option are shown below. Test NameTest # P APA Qualifying Score Minimum Composite Score PAPA Reading PAPA Mathematics PAPA Writing Minimum Composite Score Total: 686 Sum of the 3 PAPA tests must total or exceed 686. This total does not represent the sum of the 3 minimum scores. Candidates must achieve the PAPA Qualifying Score (220) in at least 1 (one) area and also reach the Minimum Composite Score Total.

40 40 Pennsylvania Educator Certification Tests (PECT) Early Childhood PreK-4 PDE Testing Requirements* (*Must have successfully completed PAPA tests.) Pennsylvania Educator Certification Tests (PECT) which provides teacher certification tests for prospective Pennsylvania teachers were developed in alignment with Pennsylvania regulations and standards, including the Pennsylvania Program Framework Guidelines and the relevant Pennsylvania Academic Standards. The tests in the PECT program are criterion-referenced and objective-based. Criterion-referenced tests are designed to measure a candidate's knowledge and skills in relation to an established standard of performance (a criterion) rather than in relation to the performance of other candidates. The tests are designed to help identify those candidates who have the level of the required knowledge and expertise to teach in the grade band(s) for which they are seeking Pennsylvania educator certification. The PECT are delivered as computer-based tests. Each PECT assessment includes multiple modules, each with its own qualifying score. Modules consist of selected-response questions. To learn more about these tests, go to Early Childhood PreK–4 The PreK–4 assessment includes three modules. Examinees must take and pass all three modules to qualify for Pennsylvania teacher certification. You may take one or all three modules at one test appointment. Format Selected-response items Module 1: 40 selected-response items Module 2: 50 selected-response items Module 3: 50 selected-response items Time Module 1: 45 minutes Module 2: 75 minutes Module 3: 75 minutes Examinees will also have 15 minutes for a computer-based testing tutorial. Test Dates By appointment, year round. Test appointments are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Test Sites CBT sites are located in Pennsylvania, nationwide, and in Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and Canada. Locate a test center. Locate a test center Qualifying Score For information about qualifying scores, visit Reference Materials Provided for this Test A glossary of common acronyms used in this field will be available during all modules. Review it now. A standard on-screen calculator will be available during Module 3. Review a calculator tutorial now.Review it nowReview a calculator tutorial now Test Fee $46 per module; $110 for all three modules. Review test fee and payment information.Review test fee and payment information Score Reporting Test results are provided at the test center at the conclusion of your test session. Your score report is available within 10 business days after testing. Testing Policies When you register, you must agree to abide by all testing rules and policies. Read them now.Read them now Prepare View the preparation materials available for this testView the preparation materials available for this test.

41 41 Pennsylvania Educator Certification Tests (PECT) Special Education PreK-8 PDE Testing Requirements* (*Must have successfully completed PAPA tests.) Pennsylvania Educator Certification Tests (PECT) which provides teacher certification tests for prospective Pennsylvania teachers were developed in alignment with Pennsylvania regulations and standards, including the Pennsylvania Program Framework Guidelines and the relevant Pennsylvania Academic Standards. The tests in the PECT program are criterion-referenced and objective-based. Criterion-referenced tests are designed to measure a candidate's knowledge and skills in relation to an established standard of performance (a criterion) rather than in relation to the performance of other candidates. The tests are designed to help identify those candidates who have the level of the required knowledge and expertise to teach in the grade band(s) for which they are seeking Pennsylvania educator certification. The PECT are delivered as computer-based tests. Each PECT assessment includes multiple modules, each with its own qualifying score. Modules consist of selected-response questions. To learn more about these tests, go to Special Education PreK–8 The Special Education PreK–8 assessment includes two modules. Examinees must take and pass both modules to qualify for Pennsylvania teacher certification. You may take one or both modules at one test appointment. Format Selected-response items Module 1: 45 selected-response items Module 2: 45 selected-response items Time Module 1: 60 minutes Module 2: 60 minutes Examinees will also have 15 minutes for a computer-based testing tutorial. Test Dates By appointment, year round. Test appointments are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Test Sites CBT sites are located in Pennsylvania, nationwide, and in Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and Canada. Locate a test center.Locate a test center Qualifying Score Performance criterion (cut score): 220 per module For information about qualifying scores, visit Reference Materials Provided for this Test A glossary of common acronyms used in this field will be available during both modules. Review it now.Review it now Test Fee $50 per module; $80 for both modules. Review test fee and payment information.Review test fee and payment information Score Reporting Test results are provided at the test center at the conclusion of your test session. Your score report is available within 10 business days after testing. Testing Policies When you register, you must agree to abide by all testing rules and policies. Read them now.Read them now Prepare View the preparation materials available for this testView the preparation materials available for this test.

42 42 Pennsylvania Educator Certification Tests (PECT) Special Education 7-12 PDE Testing Requirements* (*Must have successfully completed PAPA tests.) Pennsylvania Educator Certification Tests (PECT) which provides teacher certification tests for prospective Pennsylvania teachers were developed in alignment with Pennsylvania regulations and standards, including the Pennsylvania Program Framework Guidelines and the relevant Pennsylvania Academic Standards. The tests in the PECT program are criterion-referenced and objective-based. Criterion- referenced tests are designed to measure a candidate's knowledge and skills in relation to an established standard of performance (a criterion) rather than in relation to the performance of other candidates. The tests are designed to help identify those candidates who have the level of the required knowledge and expertise to teach in the grade band(s) for which they are seeking Pennsylvania educator certification. The PECT are delivered as computer-based tests. Each PECT assessment includes multiple modules, each with its own qualifying score. Modules consist of selected-response questions. To learn more about these tests, go to Special Education 7–12 The Special Education 7–12 assessment includes two modules. Examinees must take and pass both modules to qualify for Pennsylvania teacher certification. You may take one or both modules at one test appointment. Format Selected-response items Module 1: 45 selected-response items Module 2: 45 selected-response items Time Module 1: 60 minutes Module 2: 60 minutes Examinees will also have 15 minutes for a computer-based testing tutorial. Test Dates By appointment, year round. Test appointments are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Test Sites CBT sites are located in Pennsylvania, nationwide, and in Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and Canada. Locate a test center.Locate a test center Qualifying Score Performance criterion (cut score): 220 per module For information about qualifying scores, visit Reference Materials Provided for this Test A glossary of common acronyms used in this field will be available during both modules. Review it now. Review it now Test Fee $50 per module; $80 for both modules. Review test fee and payment information.Review test fee and payment information Score Reporting Test results are provided at the test center at the conclusion of your test session. Your score report is available within 10 business days after testing. Testing Policies When you register, you must agree to abide by all testing rules and policies. Read them now.Read them now Prepare View the preparation materials available for this testView the preparation materials available for this test.

43 43 PAPA and PECT Registration Information Go to :

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47 47 The rest of the registration process for the exams should be pretty clear. Step 3. Alternative Testing Arrangements Choose YES if you need alternative testing arrangements (physical, cognitive, learning disabilities, etc. etc.) Step 4. Test Date and Location : Choose your test date and location Step 5. Score reporting options ** See screen shot above** Step 6. Background questions Step 7. Review Registration

48 48 Elem/Middle Level (4-8) PDE Testing Requirements* (*Must have successfully completed PAPA tests) Educators applying for an initial Instructional I Elem/Middle Level 4–8 certification are required to pass the PAPA (Pre-Service Academic Performance Assessment) in addition to passing the Level 4-8 Core Assessment and Subtests PA Certification (5152, 5153, 5154, 5155). The PAPA module series must be taken first, then next the Core Assessment prior to taking the Subject Concentration tests. PAPA information and registration can be found at Pennsylvania teacher education program candidates may now register for the Middle Level 4-8 pedagogy, core and subject matter content tests at The ETS web site has been updated to provide information on 4-8 testing and program services, information, and transactions. Candidates have direct access to components of the 4-8 Praxis Tests, including: information about the tests that are available and what test(s) they need to take information about registering for a test and scheduling a test session (including test dates and sites) Information about testing policies and alternative testing arrangements test preparation materials, including study guides information about reference materials provided for a test (e.g., a calculator or glossary) information about their test results (i.e., score reports) To Be Certified in You Need to Take Test Code Qualifying Score Middle Level 4–8 (All ML certification candidates must take these tests before proceeding to Subject Concentration Test which are listed below.) Pennsylvania Grades 4–8 Core Assessment (PDF)Pennsylvania Grades 4–8 Core Assessment (PDF)*5152NA Pedagogy Subtest (PDF) English Language Arts and Social Studies Subtest (PDF) Mathematics and Science Subtest (PDF) * To pass the Pennsylvania Grades 4–8 Core Assessment you must receive a passing score on each subtest. You must take the full test on your initial attempt. If, after your first attempt you did not pass one of the individual subtests, you may take just that subtest again for a reduced fee. After passing above Core Assessment and Subtests, test takers seeking certification in Middle Level 4-8 must ALSO take the Subject Concentration test(s) for the area(s) they plan to teach. Middle Level Social Studies 4–8 Pennsylvania Grades 4–8 Subject Concentration: Social Studies (PDF) Middle Level English 4–8 Pennsylvania Grades 4–8 Subject Concentration: English Language Arts (PDF) Middle Level Mathematics 4–8 Pennsylvania Grades 4–8 Subject Concentration: Mathematics (PDF) Middle Level Science 4–8Pennsylvania Grades 4–8 Subject Concentration: Science (PDF)

49 Core Assessment Tests Module:Test Type Passing Score Pedagogy Selected Response 162 English/Language Arts and Social Studies (generalist) Selected Response 152 Mathematics and Science (generalist)Selected Response Concentration TestsTest Type Passing Score English/Language Arts Selected Response 156 Social Studies Selected Response 150 Mathematics Selected Response 173 ScienceSelected Response 156 The passing scores for the Elem/Middle Level 4-8 tests are as follows:

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70 70 Approved Courses for English Composition: EN 100 PLE Writing and Language EN 150 PLE Advanced Writing and Language EN 180 CE Introduction to Creative Writing EN 185 Introduction to Professional Writing Approved Courses for English Literature: EN 101 CE Literature: Form and Performance EN 104 HUM Introduction to Literature EN 200 Major British Writers EN 220 WCH Pre-1800 British Literature and Culture EN 230 WCH Post-1800 British Literature and Culture EN 240 WCH American Literature and Culture HEN 243 HNR WCH American Visions: Cultural Dialogue in the U.S. EN 245 Growing up in America EN 251 HUM Multicultural Literature HEN 252 HNR HUM Irony, Humor, and Despair in Modern Literature HEN 253 HNR WCH Gaelic and Anglo-Irish Ireland EN 281 CE Writing and Analyzing the Short Story [Please note: There are 300-level and 400-level English literature courses that would satisfy PDE requirements, but the assumption is that someone who takes those courses would more than likely be an English major or minor because of the prerequisites for those level of courses.] This list may also be accessed on-line: EnglishCompositionEnglishLiterature2012.pdfhttp://www.etown.edu/offices/registrationrecords/files/registration/registration/education/PDE_ EnglishCompositionEnglishLiterature2012.pdf. Approved Courses for English Composition and Literature to meet the PDE Requirements for Teacher Certification

71 71 Eligibility Students must have a major and cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.60 at the end of the spring semester of sophomore year. In addition to the GPA requirements, students must have a demonstrated record of initiative and independence in learning, proficient scores on the Education Department Teacher Dispositions/ Foundational Competencies Evaluation and field placement evaluations, as well as a favorable review of a writing sample submission that assesses writing and research analysis skills. If students meet the eligibility requirements, they will receive written confirmation from the Education Department to participate in Honors in Education. Invitation and Acceptance Students will be invited to attend an informational meeting in September of their junior year that covers the expectations and requirements involved in pursuing Honors in Education. By October 1 of their junior year, students must submit a letter to the Department Chair, indicating their intentions to pursue Honors in Education and a brief statement describing their reasons for doing so. Students will be given a research article to analyze that assesses writing and synthesizing skills (as mentioned above). Education Department faculty will review and evaluate the students writing sample and, if applicable, issue an acceptance letter to the student. Students will receive notification of acceptance by October 15 of their junior year. Required Courses Accepted students enroll in ED 399 Thesis Preparation (2 credits) during spring of their junior year. The instructor works closely with students to develop a research topic and make significant progress in completing the first three chapters of the thesis by the end of this course. A final grade of A or B is required before students can proceed to the final phase of Honors in Education and completion of the thesis. Students enroll in ED 400 Honors in Education (2 credits) during their senior year. Mentored by a primary and secondary faculty advisor, students obtain Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval for their project, conduct their research study, complete the thesis, and conclude with a public presentation of their project during Scholarship and Creative Arts Day. Students must earn a final grade of A or B in this course to be awarded Honors in Education. Pursuing Honors in Education is a challenging process. Therefore, students should work closely with their academic advisor in planning the two required courses and managing the demands of completing a thesis. Students enrolled in ED 399 and ED 400 are required to present their research at Scholarship and Creative Arts Day (SCAD). Recording of Honors in Education The Education Department will notify the Office of Registration and Records when a student successfully completes the requirements. Honors are noted on the student transcript/diploma and at commencement ceremonies. Completed theses are catalogued by the High Library for students who meet the requirements of Honors in Education and the College Honors Program. Honors in the Discipline: Honors in Education Guidelines Honors in the Discipline: Honors in Education Guidelines

72 72 Education Course Descriptions A teacher takes a hand, opens a mind, and touches a heart ~ Author Unknown

73 73 ED Foundations of Teaching and Learning 4.00 credits. This course is designed to introduce students to the philosophical, sociological, political and historical foundations of education and learning. The course emphasizes on the concepts, theories, and research on learning and the factors, including teaching, that influence learning. Includes 20 hours (i.e., 2 hours per week for 10 weeks) of field experience with a rotation of placements in early childhood, middle, and secondary levels, which will require FBI Clearance, Criminal Record Clearance, and Pennsylvania Child Abuse Clearance (fees). *Corequisite(s): ED 105L. Majors only. This course is designed to introduce students to the foundations of early childhood development. The course examines the concepts, theories, and research on child development. The course focuses on the typical and atypical physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and moral development of children between 0 and 9 years. Students will be introduced to different models and approaches in early childhood and developmentally appropriate practices. The course includes 20 hours of field experience (i.e., 2 hours per week for 10 weeks), which will require FBI Clearance, Criminal Record Clearance, and Pennsylvania Child Abuse Clearance (fees). *Prerequisite(s): ED 105. *Corequisite(s): ED 150L. Majors only.ED 105 ED Early Childhood Development 4.00 credits. ED Integrated Technology I 2.00 credits. An introductory study of current and emerging instructional media and technologies used across the grades and curricula. Organizing time and records through technology and computer-mediated communications, including basic multimedia presentation tools, are presented. Classroom-related features of Word and PowerPoint are practiced at an introductory level. Majors only. ED Early Adolescent/Adolescent Development 4.00 credits. This course examines the concepts, theories, and research on early adolescent and adolescent development. It focuses on typical and atypical physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and moral development of children ages Students will be introduced to different models, approaches, and developmentally appropriate practices for students in grades Includes 20 hours of field experience (i.e., 2 hours per week for 10 weeks) which will require FBI Clearance, Criminal Record Clearance, and Pennsylvania child Abuse Clearance (fees). *Prerequisite(s): ED 105. *Corequisite(s): ED 151L. Majors only.ED 105 ED Integrated Technology II 2.00 credits. A study of current and emerging instructional media and technologies used across the grades and curricula. Computer-mediated communications - including advanced multimedia presentation tools such as embedded video - are developed. Advanced classroom-related PowerPoint and webpage development techniques are practiced. Emphasis will be placed on use of SmartBoards, integration of K-12 student use of computers during instruction, use of handhelds, WebQuests and videostreaming. *Prerequisite(s): Permission from the Department based on demonstration of basic technology skills in Word and PowerPoint. Majors only. Education Classes

74 74 ED Pennsylvania History and Government for Social Studies Educators 4.00 credits. This course surveys political, economic, social and cultural developments in the Commonwealth from Penns Charter until the present day, with special consideration of the key topics covered under the PDE standards for the Early Adolescent and Adolescent educators. Agriculture, technology, ethnicity and immigration, urbanization, civics, government and democratization are central themes. This course examines major historical themes and, where applicable, introduces key historiographical concepts and debates. *Prerequisite(s): ED 105or ED 106, and ED 150or ED 151. Provisional or formal acceptance into Education Program required. Fall semester.ED 105ED 150ED 151 ED World Geography for Social Studies Educators 4.00 credits. This course surveys the major tools, techniques and methodological approaches associated with the disciplines of physical and cultural geography, with emphasis upon the current academic debates, western case studies, non-western case studies, cartography, human-environmental interaction, and thinking geographically. Key topics covered under the PDE, NCSS and NCGE standards for Early Adolescent and Adolescent educators also will be considered. *Prerequisite(s): ED 105or ED 106, and ED 150or ED 151. Provisional or formal acceptance into Education Program required. Spring semester.ED 105ED 150ED 151 ED The Use of Sign Language with People with Multi-Disabilities 2.00 credits. A practical sign language course for persons interested in special education. Information covered includes: 1) sign language and other alternative communication systems, 2) adaptive signing techniques, 3) developmental processes involved with signing, 4) how to choose a sign/sign system, and 5) basic core vocabulary for use with people with developmental disabilities in their environments (i.e., sheltered workshops, special school settings, group homes, etc.). *Prerequisite(s): ED 105or ED 106, and ED 150or ED 151. Provisional or formal acceptance into Education Program required. Spring semester.ED 105ED 150ED 151 ED Language and Literacy Development in Early Childhood 4.00 credits. This course focuses on the research-based principles and practices for language and literacy development of children ages birth to 9. Topics include language acquisition, reading and writing development, and strategies for teaching comprehension, fluency, word study and vocabulary in the early grades (PreK through fourth). Requires field experience. *Prerequisite(s): ED 105, and ED 150or ED 151. *Corequisite(s): ED 250L. Provisional or formal acceptance into Education Program required.ED 105ED 150ED 151 ED Educational Assessment and Evaluation 4.00 credits. Examines current issues, trends and practices in educational assessment. Emphasizes the study of different assessment and evaluation procedures in the early childhood, elementary and secondary classroom. Explores a variety of traditional and innovative approaches to assessment of student learning and development. *Prerequisite(s): ED 250, or permission of the Department. Provisional or formal acceptance into Education Program required. ED 250

75 75 ED Methods of Secondary Education 6.00 credits. A study of the instructional methodology of an academic discipline under the guidance of a clinical professor in the academic major (e.g., science, English, mathematics). Field experience is required. *Prerequisite(s): ED 150or ED 151. Formal acceptance into Education Program required.ED 150ED 151 ED Methods of Modern Language Education K Credits. A study of the instructional methodology of an academic discipline under the guidance of a clinical professor in the academic major (e.g., science, English, mathematics). Field experience is required. *Prerequisite(s): ED 150or ED 151. Formal acceptance into Education Program required.ED 150ED 151 ED PreK-4 Family, School, and Community Partnerships 4.00 credits. A study of family and community risk and protective factors influencing the development of PreK-4 students and best practices and models for establishing family, school and community partnerships. Twenty hours of field experience required (i.e., 2 hours per week for 10 weeks). *Prerequisite(s): ED 150or ED 151. Formal acceptance into Education Program required.ED 150ED 151 ED Literacy Assessment and Intervention in Elem/Middle Level 4.00 credits. This course explores research-based approaches to teaching language arts for intermediate level students. Topics include extending meaning and recognition of vocabulary, critical reading and writing, formal and informal assessments, organizational patterns for group and/or individual instruction, and middle-grade reading experience and materials. Twenty hours of field experience required (i.e., 2 hours per week for 10 weeks). *Prerequisite(s): ED 258. Formal acceptance into Education Program required. Fall semester.ED 258 ED Methods for Teaching Science and Health in Early Childhood 4.00 credits. A study of science processes in an early childhood school program and the utilization of multiple resources, organization, management, evaluation, instructional strategies, and integration of science and health in the early childhood program. Field experience is required. *Prerequisite(s): ED 250and ED 258. *Corequisite(s): ED 335, ED 345and ED 365. Formal acceptance into Education Program required. Fall semester.ED 250ED 258ED 335ED 345ED 365 ED Methods for Teaching Science and Health in Elementary/Middle Level 4.00 credits. This course provides for the study of science processes at the middle school level (fourth through eighth grades), with emphasis upon the utilization of multiple resources, organization, classroom management, instructional strategies and assessment. Field experience is required. *Corequisite(s): ED 336, ED 346, and ED 366. Formal acceptance into Education Program required. Spring semester.ED 336ED 346ED 366

76 76 ED Methods for Teaching Mathematics in Early Childhood 4.00 credits. A study of how children develop a background of understanding and skill in mathematics in Pre-K to fourth grade, concentrating on the development of problem-solving, reasoning, and communication skills in mathematics, and connecting mathematics and the real world. Additional focus will be on organization for instruction, alternative means of evaluation, and teaching special needs and at-risk students. Field experience is required. *Prerequisite(s): ED 250and ED 258. *Corequisite(s): ED 325, ED 345and ED 365. Formal acceptance into Education Program required. Fall semester.ED 250ED 258ED 325ED 345ED 365 ED ELL: Linguistic and Cultural Diversity in the Classroom 4.00 credits. This course introduces future teachers to the special linguistic and cultural educational needs of English language learners (ELL). Aspects of cross-linguistic and cross-cultural knowledge will be studied as well as methods of instruction that focus on the language needs and background knowledge of the ELL. Theory and practices of current ELL programs will also be examined. Twenty hours of field experience required (i.e., 2 hours per week for 10 weeks). *Prerequisite(s): ED 105, and ED 150or ED 151. *Corequisite(s): ED 341L. Formal acceptance into Education Program required.ED 105ED 150ED 151 ED Methods for Teaching Reading and Writing in Early Childhood 4.00 credits. This course furthers the study of literacy theories and research-based practices presented in ED 250. This course explores approaches to teaching reading and writing in the primary grades and examines the construction of rich literacy environment in culturally, linguistically, and socio-economically diverse classrooms. Course content focuses on instructional strategies, curriculum design and implementation, and assessment and evaluation. Field experience is required for Methods Block. (Field experience: Students in assigned school classroom all day Friday for 10 weeks and all day every school day for the last two weeks of the semester for a total of 150 hours.) *Prerequisite(s): ED 250and ED 258. *Corequisite(s): ED 325, ED 335and ED 365. Formal acceptance into Education Program required. Fall semester.ED 250ED 250ED 258ED 325ED 335ED 365 ED Methods for Teaching Mathematics in Elementary/Middle Level 4.00 credits. A study of how children develop a background of understanding and skill in mathematics in fourth through eighth grades with emphasis on problem-solving, reasoning and communication skills. Additional focus will be on organization for instruction, teaching methods, accommodations and alternative strategies. *Corequisite(s): ED 326, ED 346and ED 366. Formal acceptance into Education Program required. Spring semester.ED 326ED 346ED 366 ED Methods for Teaching Reading and Writing in Elementary/Middle Level 4.00 credits. This course furthers the study of literacy theories and research-based practices presented in ED 352 Literacy Assessment, Instruction and Intervention in Elem/Middle Level. This course explores approaches to teaching reading and writing in the elementary/middle grades and examines the construction of a rich literacy environment in culturally, linguistically, and socio-economically diverse classrooms. Course content focuses on instructional strategies, curriculum design and implementation, and assessment and evaluation. (Field experience: Students in assigned school classroom all day Friday for 10 weeks and all day every school day for the last two weeks of the semester for a total of 150 hours.) *Prerequisite(s): ED 258. *Corequisite(s): ED 326, ED 336and ED 366. Formal acceptance into Education Program required.ED 258ED 326ED 336ED 366

77 77 ED Literacy Assessment and Intervention in Early Childhood 4.00 credits. This course provides an advanced study of literacy instruction with an emphasis on classroom-based assessments and instructional planning for intervention. This course examines the use of screening, diagnostic and formative literacy assessments in the classroom as well as standardized tests (including PSSA). Class assignments focus on current research to develop curriculum that supports ongoing evaluation of students reading and writing progress and planning appropriate accommodations within a rich literacy environment. Twenty hours of field experience required (i.e., 2 hours per week for 10 weeks). *Prerequisite(s): ED 345. Formal acceptance into Education Program required. Spring semester.ED 345 ED Integrated Strategies for Creative Expression in Early Childhood 4.00 credits. This course is designed to familiarize students with the creative, self-expression and problem-solving skills among children in early childhood settings. Students will explore creative learning theories and research and focus on developmentally appropriate curriculum strategies in all developmental domains. This course emphasizes strategies to develop, implement and evaluate activities in the environment that encourages and supports creative self- expression and problem solving in children. *Prerequisite(s): ED 250. Formal acceptance into Education Program required. Spring semester.ED 250 ED Methods for Teaching Social Studies in Early Childhood 4.00 credits. A study of content, teaching strategies, materials, organizing approaches and curricula for teaching social studies at the early elementary level (PreK through fourth grade). Students will be required to complete a field experience component, documented by a journal. *Prerequisite(s): ED 250and ED 258. *Corequisite(s): ED 325, ED 335and ED 345. Formal acceptance into Education Program required. Fall semester.ED 250ED 258ED 325ED 335 ED 345 ED Methods for Teaching Social Studies in Elementary/Middle Level 4.00 credits. This course will examine the content, teaching strategies, materials, organizing approaches and curricula for teaching social studies at the middle school level (fourth through eighth grades). Students will be required to complete a field experience component, documented by a journal. *Corequisite(s): ED 326, ED 336and ED 346. Formal acceptance into Education Program required. Spring semester.ED 326ED 336ED 346

78 78 ED Senior Project in Education 2.00 credits. Students participating in the Departments Honors in the Discipline Program may register for this course during semesters in which research or writing for their project is being completed. Recognition for Honors in the Discipline is not assured by completion of this course. See Department Chair for additional information. *Prerequisite(s): Invitation to Honors in the Discipline Program. Register by Instructor. This course is repeatable for credit. ED Professional Internship credits. Supervised student teaching for a full semester at the level of certification (Early Childhood, Elementary/Middle, dual certification in Special Education, or Secondary Education). *Prerequisite(s): Completion of all program requirements with Education prefixes and cumulative grade point average required at the time of full admission to the program *Corequisite(s): ED 495, ED 496or ED 497. Register by Instructor. Graded Pass/No Pass. Course fees.ED 495ED 496ED 497 ED Independent Study in Education Variable credit. Upon the initiative of the student, a program of study may be organized with a faculty member on a topic of mutual interest. *Prerequisite(s): Approval of the Department Chair and the Independent Study Committee. Register by Instructor. ED Senior Seminar for Early Childhood 4.00 credits. A study of professional and ethical practices, family and community relationships, and special education issues in early childhood. (PreK-4th grade). Particular emphasis will be given to the laws, procedures, and codes of conduct that guide practice, collaboration with diverse families, advocacy for the rights of children and their families, and support for the transition of children to new educational settings. *Corequisite(s): ED 470. Register by Instructor.ED 470 ED Senior Seminar for Elementary/ Middle Level 4.00 credits. This course serves as an issues seminar for pre-service teachers, engaging them in active discussion of professional and ethical practices, family and community relationships, and special education issues in middle school settings (fourth through eighth grades). Particular emphasis will be given to the laws, procedures, and codes of conduct that guide practice, collaboration with diverse families, advocacy for the rights of early adolescent and adolescent students and their families, and support for the transition of adolescents to new educational settings. *Corequisite(s): ED 470. Register by Instructor.ED 470 ED Senior Seminar for Secondary Education 4.00 credits. This course serves as an issues seminar for pre-service teachers, engaging them in active discussion of professional and ethical practices, family and community relationships, (urban, rural and suburban environments), advocacy for student rights, the transition of adolescents to new educational settings and special education issues in secondary school settings. *Corequisite(s): ED 470. Register by Instructor.ED 470

79 79 SED Learning Environment and Social Interaction in Inclusive Settings 4.00 credits. A study of the scientific principles and best practices for creating and sustaining an optimal learning environment and positive social interaction for diverse learners in an inclusive classroom setting. Emphasis is on analyzing factors that influence academic and social behavior, adapting the physical environment, implementing an equitable classroom management system, maintaining a respectful climate, teaching social skills, and implementing positive behavioral supports. *Prerequisite(s): ED 105, and ED 150or ED 151. Provisional or formal acceptance into Education Program required.ED 105ED 150ED 151 SED Foundations of Inclusive Education 4.00 credits. This course is an introduction to philosophical, historical and legal foundations of Special Education and inclusive education principles and practices. The history, etiology, characteristics and accommodations for students with special needs in the classroom setting will be examined. Thirty hours of field experience required (i.e., 3 hours per week for 10 weeks) which will require FBI Clearance, Criminal Record Clearance, and Pennsylvania Child Abuse Clearance (fees). *Prerequisite(s): ED 105, and ED 150or ED 151. *Corequisite(s): SED 222L. Provisional or formal acceptance into Education Program required.ED 105ED 150ED 151 SED Methods of Teaching Students with High Incidence Disabilities 4.00 credits. A study of the specialized instructional strategies to adapt and accommodate classroom environments, testing methodologies, and curricula to meet the needs of exceptional children and youth. Emphasis is on high incidence disabilities, such as learning disabilities, ADD/ADHD, emotional and behavior disorders, communication disorders, and cultural or linguistic diversity. Field experience is required. *Prerequisite(s): ED 250and SED 222Sor permission of the Department, *Corequisite(s): SED 224L. Provisional or formal acceptance into Education Program required.ED 250SED 222 Special Education Classes

80 80 The Graduate Program 4+1 Degree in Special Education (PreK-8 or 7-12 Certification) The Graduate Program 4+1 Degree in Special Education (PreK-8 or 7-12 Certification)

81 81 Program Description: To more fully compliment Elizabethtown Colleges pledge to prepare students intellectually, socially, aesthetically and ethically for lives of service and leadership as citizens of the world by combining classroom instruction with experiential learning [to] advance independent thought, personal integrity and social responsibility as the foundations for a life of learning(http://www.etown.edu/mission), the Education Department now offers a Masters degree in Special Education (PreK-8 and 7-12).http://www.etown.edu/mission Federal and state mandates drive the need for highly qualified teachers in these areas of special education, and, by designing the model for special education in the PreK-8 and 7-12 options, all certificate candidates at Elizabethtown (Pre-K to 4, 4-8, 7-12 and K-12) are able to participate. Candidates in the new pipeline program will be exposed to opportunities for more advanced curricular study, more time and variety in the field (urban, suburban, rural, learning support, emotional support, inclusive, resource, and self-contained classrooms), enhanced quality of practice in the field, two full semesters of student teaching, and research and reflection about pedagogical best practices through seminar coursework. This new model embraces the colleges 2012 Strategic Plan, namely the emphasis upon expansion of graduate programs and greater emphasis upon high impact practices and student/faculty research collaborations. It is also the expression of a 2010 qualitative survey of departmental alumni who cited the development of this academic pathway as a top priority. Program Hallmarks: Students will complete their baccalaureate degree in a general education certification area in 4 years. Eligible students may then move to finish the special education requirements, including a research project (Graduate Seminar) and another semester of student teaching. The intensive student teaching supervision of the undergraduate program (weekly supervisory visits) will continue in the graduate program. Courses in the fifth year will be administered using a mixture of traditional, on-line, hybrid, and accelerated formats.

82 82 Program Assessments: Teacher candidates are regularly assessed through formative and summative coursework assignments according to key learning objectives which are mapped to specific program competencies as defined by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and to the general student learning outcomes for the Education Department. Such expectations and objectives are included on every course syllabi. The departments learning outcomes dictate that every student demonstrates the following: A thorough knowledge of the content and pedagogical skills in planning, preparation, and assessment. An ability to establish and maintain a purposeful and equitable environment for learning. An ability to deliver instruction that engages students in learning by using a variety of instructional strategies, including technology. Qualities and dispositions that characterize a professional person in aspects that occur in and beyond the classroom/building. An awareness of, and adherence to, the professional, ethical, and legal responsibilities of being a certified teacher. An ongoing commitment to lifelong learning and professional development through field- related clubs, conferences, and organizations. Teaching and advocacy for principles of social justice and civic competence. Teacher candidates are regularly assessed (formative and summative) on Danielsons Domains (Planning and Preparation, Classroom Environment, Instruction, and Professionalism) during field placements. Input is given from classroom professors, field supervisors, and cooperating teachers across these areas. In fact, student teachers are observed on a weekly basis by their supervisors. Students also provide self-assessment/reflection through blogs, journals, and similar assignments. Teacher candidates are also regularly assessed regarding their dispositions, meaning the non- academic competencies critical to the success for a career in education. These competencies include: Communication/ Interpersonal Skills, Emotional and Physical Abilities, Cognitive Dispositions, and Personal and Professional Requirements. Teacher candidates complete a professional portfolio using the Danielson Framework for Professional Practice. The compilation begins in Year 1 of the program and is continued through Year 5. Students must meet expectations for the portfolio in individual coursework, for admission requirements to the program, and then exit expectations for the degree in the Senior and Graduate Seminars respectively. Students construct the portfolio using Digication software. Teacher candidates navigate a three-step process for full admission into the graduate program - Provisional Acceptance and Formal Acceptance at the undergraduate program and then Graduate Acceptance.

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84 84 Graduate Program Course Descriptions MSE Learning Environment and Social Interaction in Inclusive Settings (SED 512) 4.00 credits.. A study of the scientific principles and best practices for creating and sustaining an optimal learning environment and positive social interaction for diverse learners in an inclusive classroom setting. Emphasis is on analyzing factors that influence academic and social behavior, adapting the physical environment, implementing an equitable classroom management system, maintaining a respectful climate, teaching social skills, and implementing positive behavioral supports. *Prerequisite(s):Provisional or formal acceptance into Education Program required. Register by Instructor. MSE Foundations of Inclusive Education (SED 222) 4.00 credits.. This course is an introduction to philosophical, historical, and legal foundations of Special Education and inclusive education principles and practices. The history, etiology, characteristics, and accommodations for students with special needs in the classroom setting will be examined. Thirty hours of field experience required (i.e., 3 hours per week for 10 weeks) which will require FBI Clearance, Criminal Record Clearance, and Pennsylvania Child Abuse Clearance (fees). *Prerequisite(s): Provisional or formal acceptance into Education Program required. *Corequisite(s): MSE 522L. Register by Instructor. MSE Methods of Teaching Students with High Incidence Disabilities (SED 224) 4.00 credits.. A study of the specialized instructional strategies to adapt and accommodate classroom environments, testing methodologies, and curricula to meet the needs of exceptional children and youth. Emphasis is on high incidence disabilities, such as learning disabilities, ADD/ADHD, emotional and behavior disorders, communication disorders, and cultural or linguistic diversity. Field experience is required. *Prerequisite(s): Provisional or formal acceptance into Education Program required. *Corequisite(s): MSE 524L. Register by Instructor... MSE Methods of Teaching Students with Low Incidence Disabilities 4.00 credits. A study of the purpose and uses of various forms of assessment in PK-12 Special and Inclusive Education. Emphasis is on the various purposes of testing data, best practices in assessment, and legal and ethical considerations related to administration, eligibility, instruction, and placement decisions. *Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Graduate Education Program is required. Register by Instructor. MSE Assessment in Special and Inclusive Education 4.00 credits... A study of the basic purposes and uses of various forms of assessment in PK-12 Special and Inclusive Education. Emphasis is on various purposes of testing data, best practices in assessment, and legal and ethical considerations related to administration, eligibility, instruction, and placement decisions. *Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Graduate Education Program is required. Register by Instructor. MSE Etiology, Equity, and Law 4.00 credits. This course discusses federal and state special education law, including relevant court cases, and its interrelationship with equity and etiology of special needs students. Laws, regulations, policy, and stereotypes relating to the education of special needs populations are discussed. Methods of conflict resolution, mediation, and ethical standards are examined. Students will be required to apply what they learn as they analyze real-life case scenarios. *Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Graduate Education Program is required. Register by Instructor.

85 85 MSE Effective Instruction for Students with PDD and/or ED 4.00 credits. This course is designed to prepare teachers to support the participation and education of students with Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDD) or Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (EBD) in the PK-12 setting. Emphasis is on the diagnostic criteria, methods of identification, and best practices in intervention and support according to current research. Field experience is required. *Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Graduate Education Program is required. *Corequisite(s): MSE 544,MSE 565, and MSE 542L. Register by Instructor.MSE 544MSE 565 MSE Intensive Reading, Writing, and Mathematics Intervention 4.00 credits. This course provides substantive, research-based instruction that effectively prepares future teachers to assess and provide interventions to students who are struggling in the reading, writing, and mathematics content areas. An emphasis will be placed on determining differences between typical and problematic performance in each of the areas and modifying instructional methods, providing strategy instruction, and monitoring progress in each area. A clinical field experience is required.*Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Graduate Education Program is required. *Corequisite(s): MSE 542, MSE 565, and MSE 544L. Register by Instructor.MSE 542MSE 565 MSE Issues in Special Education 4.00 credits. Working with a faculty mentor, this is a self-directed and self-constructed course for those specializing in PK-8 or 7-12 certifications. Graduate candidates select specific topics to explore that are particularly germane to their certificate levels and companion competencies. *Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Graduate Education Program is required. *Corequisite(s): MSE 542 and MSE 544. Register by Instructor.MSE 542MSE 544 MSE Graduate Student Teaching credits. This experience is supervised student teaching for a full semester in Special Education. To be taken in conjunction with the Graduate Research Seminar. *Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Graduate Education Program is required. *Corequisite(s):MSE 590. Graded Pass/No Pass. Register by Instructor.MSE 590 MSE Graduate Research Seminar 4.00 credits. This course serves as the research seminar capstone for graduate teachers to understand and apply research theories and design, culminating in a scholarly paper and corresponding oral defense. Experience is supervised student teaching for a full semester in Special Education. To be taken in conjunction with the Graduate Student Teaching. *Prerequisite(s): MSE 565.*Corequisite(s): MSE 570. Register by Instructor.MSE 565MSE 570

86 86 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TEACHER DISPOSITIONS FOUNDATIONAL COMPETENCIES POLICY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TEACHER DISPOSITIONS FOUNDATIONAL COMPETENCIES POLICY

87 87 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TEACHER DISPOSITIONS FOUNDATIONAL COMPETENCIES POLICY Introduction and Rationale The Department of Education has a responsibility to the educational community to ensure that individuals whom Elizabethtown College recommends to the State of Pennsylvania for certification are qualified to join the education profession. Teaching and other preK- 12 and community education-related professions require strong academic preparation and mastery of pedagogy or other professional competencies. These professions also require non-academic competencies, such as communication or interpersonal skills, which are as critical to success as those in the academic domain. This document sets forth those essential non-academic criteria or teaching dispositions (Foundational Competencies). Teacher Dispositions/Foundational Competencies serve several important functions, including, but not limited to: (a) providing information to those considering preK-12 and community professional careers that will help such students in their career decisionmaking; (b) advising applicants of non-academic criteria considered in admissions decisions made by the colleges preK-12 and community professional preparation programs; (c) serving as the basis for feedback provided to students in these programs regarding their progress toward mastery of all program objectives; and (d) serving as the basis for the final assessment of attainment of graduation requirements and recommendation for certification. All candidates in the Elizabethtown College professional preparation programs are expected to demonstrate that they are prepared to work with children and youth in educational settings. This preparation results from the combination of successful completion of college coursework and field/internship experiences and the demonstration of important human characteristics and dispositions that all educators should possess. These characteristics and dispositions, the Elizabethtown College Teacher Dispositions/Foundational Competencies Policy, are outlined below. Definition Dispositions are defined as internal values, beliefs, and attitudes that are manifested in patterns of professional behaviors. The Dispositional Assessment system does not assess values, beliefs, or attitudes directly; instead, dispositions are only assessed as they are manifested in patterns of behaviors and candidate performances in their work with preK-12 students and their families, peers, faculty, and the community ________________________________________________________________________ 1 The primary source used in the preparation of this document was the policy and procedure document from the University of Maryland and University of Texas at San Antonio. Additional sources include, but are not limited to, policy and procedure documents from the University of Rochester Medical Center; University of West Virginia at Parkersburg; University of Wisconsin, Madison; Michigan State University; Medical College of Wisconsin; New Hampshire Technical Institute; Franklin College; and the University of Iowa.

88 88 Department of Education Teacher Dispositions/Foundational Competencies The Department of Education Teacher Dispositions/Foundational Competencies are grouped into four categories: Communication/Interpersonal Skills, Emotional and Physical Abilities, Cognitive Dispositions, and Personal and Professional Requirements. Within the professional context to which each candidate aspires, all candidates must: Communication/Interpersonal Skills Be able to express themselves effectively in written and oral English in order to communicate concepts, assignments, evaluations, and expectations with members of the learning community such as college faculty, students, parents, administrators, and other staff. Candidates must write clearly and use correct grammar and spelling. They demonstrate sufficient skills in written English to understand content presented in the program and to adequately complete all written assignments, as specified by faculty. Candidates must communicate effectively with other students, faculty, staff, and professionals. They express ideas and feelings clearly and demonstrate a willingness and an ability to listen to others. Candidates must demonstrate sufficient skills in spoken English to understand content presented in the program, to adequately complete all verbal assignments, and to meet the objectives of field placement experiences, as specified by faculty. Have communication skills that are responsive to different perspectives represented in diverse classrooms and/or other professional environments. Candidates must appreciate the value of diversity and look beyond self in interactions with others. They must not impose personal, religious, sexual, and/or cultural values on others. Candidates must demonstrate an awareness of appropriate social boundaries between students and educators and show that they are ready and able to observe those boundaries. Have the necessary interpersonal competencies to function effectively with students and parents, and to function collaboratively as part of a professional team. Candidates must demonstrate positive social skills in professional and social interactions with faculty, colleagues, parents, and students Candidates must demonstrate the ability to express their viewpoints and negotiate difficulties appropriately, without behaving unprofessionally with instructors, peers, or students.

89 89 Emotional and Physical Abilities Be able to work under time constraints, concentrate in distracting situations, make subjective judgments, and ensure safety in emergencies. Candidates must demonstrate the ability to work with frequent interruptions, to respond appropriately to unexpected situations; and to cope with extreme variations in workload and stress levels. Candidates must possess the ability to make and execute quick, appropriate, and accurate decisions in a stressful environment. Candidates must have the capacity to maintain composure and continue to function well in a myriad of situations. Have the physical stamina to work a contractual day and perform extended and additional duties of a school professional, such as parent conferences, after-school events, and other assigned duties. Candidates must exhibit motor and sensory abilities to attend and participate in class and practicum placements. Candidates must be able to tolerate physically demanding workloads and to function effectively under stress. Cognitive Dispositions Be able to organize time and materials, to prioritize tasks, to perform several tasks at once, and to adapt to changing situations. Candidates must have the mental capacity for complex thought as demonstrated in prerequisite college level course work and in standardized testing. Candidates must have sufficient cognitive (mental) capacities to assimilate the technically detailed and complex information presented in formal lectures; small group discussions; and individual teaching, counseling, or administrative settings; and in classroom and school settings. Candidates must be able to analyze, synthesize, integrate concepts, and problem solve to formulate assessment and educational judgments. Candidates must demonstrate the ability to think analytically about educational issues. They are thoughtfully reflective about their practice. Candidates must demonstrate the ability to multi-task and to adapt to and display flexibility in changing situations. Candidates must be able to perform the above skills independently. The use of a trained intermediary is not acceptable in many classroom/school situations, because a candidate must be able to exercise independent judgment without relying on or having the filter of someone elses power of observation and selection.

90 90 Personal and Professional Requirements Arrive (and be on time) for professional commitments, including classes and field experiences. Candidates must meet deadlines for course assignments and program requirements. A pattern of repeated absences, lateness, and failure to meet deadlines in courses or fieldwork is not acceptable. Seek assistance and follow supervision in a timely manner, and accept and respond appropriately to constructive review of their work from supervisors. Candidates must show that they are ready to reflect on their practice and accept constructive feedback in a professional manner. They demonstrate the ability to act upon reasonable criticism. Candidates must be flexible, open to new ideas, and willing and able to modify their beliefs and practices related to their work. Demonstrate attitudes of integrity, responsibility, and tolerance. Candidates must demonstrate honesty and integrity by being truthful about background, experiences, and qualifications; doing their own work; giving credit for the ideas of others; and providing proper citation of source materials. Candidates must interact courteously, fairly, and professionally with people from diverse racial, cultural, and social backgrounds and of different genders or sexual preferences. Candidates must not make emotional, verbal or physical threats or intimidation; engage in sexual harassment; become involved in sexual relationships with their students, supervisors, or faculty; or abuse others in physical, emotional, verbal, or sexual ways. Candidates must demonstrate the ability to understand the perspectives of others in the context of teaching, counseling, administration, etc. and the ability to separate personal and professional issues. Candidates must exhibit acceptance of and are able to make appropriate adjustments for exceptional learners. Candidates must protect the confidentiality of student information unless disclosure serves professional purpose or is required by law. Show respect for self and others. Candidates must exhibit respect for all Elizabethtown College and school personnel, as well as peers, children and their families and members of their communities.

91 91 Candidates must be free of the influence of illegal drugs and alcoholic beverages in classes and field placements. They are expected to abide by the Elizabethtown College Student Social Conduct Code. Candidates must demonstrate the ability to deal with current life stressors through the use of appropriate coping mechanisms. They handle stress effectively by using appropriate self-care and by developing supportive relationships with colleagues, peers, and others. Candidates must use sound judgment. They seek and effectively use help for medical and emotional problems that interfere with scholastic and/or professional performance. Project an image of professionalism. Candidates must demonstrate appropriate personal hygiene habits. Candidates must dress appropriately for their professional contexts. Candidates must possess maturity, self-discipline, and good judgment. Candidates must demonstrate good attendance, integrity, honesty, conscientiousness in work, and teamwork Implementation and Review Procedures During the orientation phase of their professional programs and/or at the beginning of education courses requiring field/internship experiences, candidates will receive a copy of the Department of Education Teacher Dispositions/Foundational Competencies Policy and be asked to sign a Teacher Dispositions/Foundational Competencies Acknowledgement Form. The original, signed form will be kept in the candidates permanent file, and a copy will be returned to the student. Self-assessments by students on the Teacher Dispositions/Foundational Competencies will occur during the students first 100-level education course, as part of provisional acceptance, as part of formal acceptance, and during senior seminar (see Candidates Self Assessment). At the end of each semester, faculty teaching courses in Education will evaluate students using the Dispositions/Foundational Competencies Evaluation Form. Students who are evaluated as not meeting proficiency on the Dispositions/Foundational Competencies will be reviewed by the Education Standards Committee (ESC). The ESC will make recommendations regarding necessary actions students will be expected to take to achieve proficiency. The ESC may also make recommendations concerning continuation in the Education Departments program to prepare certified teachers. Proactive Involvement of Students 1. The Education department will make every effort to help teacher candidates understand the importance of dispositions to the profession as well as the specific expectations on which they will be assessed. The rubric will be discussed in designated classes and students will self-assess using the rubric. Students will receive a copy of the Teacher Dispositions/Foundational Competencies Policy.

92 92 2. All documents relating to the rating of students dispositions and other competencies will be treated as student records and thus as subject to the privacy rules and other provisions of FERPA. Teacher Dispositions/Foundational Competencies Evaluation System 1. Teacher dispositions of students will be evaluated at the end of the semester by faculty of each Education course. If a student receives a rating of Does not meet proficiency in any competency, the student will have an opportunity to meet with the professor for clarification, sign the evaluation form, and receive a copy of the form. If a student receives a rating of Partially proficient in one or more categories, the student will also have the opportunity to meet with the professor for clarification, sign the evaluation form, and receive a copy of the form. A copy of the evaluation form will be submitted to the department for inclusion in the students file. 2. A student who receives a rating of Does not meet proficiency in any competency must be reviewed by the Education Standards Committee (ESC) of the Education Department at the end of the semester. Faculty may also ask ESC to review students who receive a rating of Partially proficient in one or more competencies. 3. Students whose evaluations will be reviewed by ESC will receive written notice that the review will occur. They may elect to submit a written statement for consideration by ESC. 4. ESC reviews all cases individually and makes recommendations to the Chair of the Education Department. ESC recommendations may include, but are not limited to, continuation in the Education Departments program to prepare certified teachers with suggestions for improving areas of identified problems, frequent monitoring of progress, or additional fieldwork. If the problems are not ameliorated or seem to be beyond remediation, ESC may recommend that continuation in the Education Departments program to prepare certified teachers be denied. 5. The student will receive a letter from ESC indicating its recommendation. A copy of the letter will be sent to the students department chair(s), advisor, and the faculty member who completed the evaluation form. 6. The Chair of the Education Department does not serve on ESC but receives ESCs recommendations. Students may appeal the recommendation of ESC to the Chair of the Education Department. 7. If ESC recommends discontinuation in the Education Departments program to prepare certified teachers, and the Chair of the Education Department concurs, the recommendation will be forwarded to the Dean of Faculty for action; other recommendations will be acted on within the department.

93 93 8. Student may appeal actions by the Chair of Education to the Dean of Faculty, and appeal actions by Dean of Faculty to the Provost/Senior Vice President. Special Notice of Concern 1. A Special Notice of Concern may be sent to the Chair of the Education Department. This Special Notice of Concern may be reported by any of the following associated with Elizabethtown College: a) faculty member of any department, b) professional staff member, c) college supervisor or d) any professional member of a school such as a building principal or cooperating teacher. 2. Following documentation and review of a Special Notice of Concern, the Chair of the Education Department may take one or more actions including, but not limited to, the following: a) request a meeting with the student, b) request an urgent review by ESC, c) request a review by ESC at the end of the semester, and d) request a judicial review by Dean of Students or designee. Assistance For Individuals With Disabilities Teacher Dispositions/Foundational Competencies may be met with, or without, accommodations. The College complies with the requirements of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act of Therefore, the Department of Education will endeavor to make reasonable accommodations with respect to its Teaching Dispositions/Foundational Competencies for an applicant with a disability who is otherwise qualified. Disability shall mean, with respect to an individual, (1) a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major life functions of such individual; (2) a record of such an impairment; or (3) being regarded as having such an impairment. The College reserves the right to reject any requests for accommodations that are unreasonable, including those that would involve the use of an intermediary that would require a student to rely on someone else's power of selection and observation, fundamentally alter the nature of the Colleges educational program, lower academic standards, cause an undue hardship on the College, or endanger the safety of students or others. Questions or requests for accommodations pertaining to the Department of Education Teacher Dispositions/Foundational Competencies should be directed to Lynne Davies, Director of Disability Services ( ; ) or Dr. Rachel Finley- Bowman, Chair, Department of Education ( ; Confidentiality Unless a student has expressly waived his or her privilege to confidentiality of medical records provided to substantiate either a disability or a recommendation for an accommodation, the Department of Education administrators to which such information has been communicated shall maintain such information in a manner that preserves its confidentiality.

94 94 TEACHER DISPOSITIONS/FOUNDATIONAL COMPETENCIES ACKOWLEDGEMENT FORM Within the professional context to which each candidate aspires, all candidates must: Communication/Interpersonal Skills be able to express themselves effectively in written and oral English in order to communicate concepts, assignments, evaluations, and expectations with members of the learning community such as college faculty, students, parents, administrators, and other staff; have communication skills that are responsive to different perspectives represented in diverse classrooms and/or other professional environments; have the necessary interpersonal competencies to function effectively with students and parents, and to function collaboratively as part of a professional team; Emotional and Physical Abilities be able to work under time constraints, concentrate in distracting situations, make subjective judgments, and ensure safety in emergencies; have the physical stamina to work a contractual day and perform extended and additional duties of a school professional such as parent conferences, after-school events, and other assigned duties; Cognitive Dispositions be able to organize time and materials, to prioritize tasks, to perform several tasks at once, and to adapt to changing situations; Personal and Professional Requirements arrive (and be on time) for professional commitments, including classes and field experiences; seek assistance and follow supervision in a timely manner, and accept and respond appropriately to constructive review of their work from supervisors; demonstrate attitudes of integrity, responsibility, and tolerance; show respect for self and others; and refrain from making emotional, verbal, or physical threats or intimidation project an image of professionalism. I have read and acknowledge receipt of the Department of Education Teacher Dispositions /Foundational Competencies Policy. I understand that if the criteria listed above are not met satisfactorily, I may be denied admission and/or continuation in the Department of Education Professional Teacher Preparation Program and/or denied the opportunity to complete the extensive internship component of the curriculum. __________________________ _______________________ _________________ Candidate Signature PRINTED Name Date NOTE: The College has a legal obligation to provide appropriate accommodations for students with documented disabilities. If you have a documented disability and are seeking accommodations, you should register with the Office of Disability Services ( ) and notify your course instructors, academic advisor of your specific approved accommodations, as appropriate. Students should initiate this process as soon as possible (prior to the start of classes and/or field experience).

95 95 Fieldwork & Observations As an education major at Elizabethtown College, you will have field experiences every year from your first year through your senior year. Field placements occur in urban, suburban and rural schools, and in a variety of grades within your certification guidelines. Our program stresses the importance of supervised field experiences which complement on-campus courses in education. It is the embodiment of theory into practice. Student Teaching Student teaching, your professional internship, is the capstone experience of our various teacher preparation education programs. Student teachers are placed at cooperating school districts in the local and surrounding areas. Students may petition to be considered for partial student teaching abroad experience in combination with a Pennsylvania placement. College supervisors and cooperating teachers work in partnership to mentor the student teacher and provide a quality learning experience. Academic Service-Learning Many curricular and co-curricular opportunities will arise that will help prepare you to enter the field of education. These include reading to children at libraries, tutoring Spanish-speaking children and adults that are learning English, volunteering as a science fair judge, tutoring local students and many more. Poverty Simulation The Poverty Simulation is a profoundly moving experience. It provokes thought, emotion and insightful conversation about the realities of poverty and how entire communities need to work together to address the problem. Most importantly, it moves people to get involved and make a difference! The Community Action Program (CAP) of Lancaster Countys poverty simulation is a series of role playing scenarios that give participants the opportunity to learn about the realities of poverty and its effects. People adopt a new persona and a family profile that they must live with for the duration of the exercise. They must navigate through daily tasks that many of us take for granted. During four 15-minute weeks those assigned adult roles try to maintain their home, feed their families, send their children to school, and maintain utility services while trying to navigate local support and resources. Student Teaching and Field Observations

96 96 Global Opportunities Explore classrooms around the world! Elizabethtown College strongly encourages its students to study abroad. As an education major, there are many benefits to experiencing life in another culture including those directly related to your area of studysuch as a Spanish Education majors studying in South America or a future history teacher spending a semester in Greece. There are several ways to explore the bigger world at Elizabethtown College: Short-Term Trips with an Education Faculty Member Faculty members from the education department, as well as other disciplines, often arrange short-term cultural or educational excursions. Some of these experiences also are tied into a specific course. During the academic year, the department will offer Peace Education and Integrated Schools in Northern Ireland and the United States, allowing students to travel to Belfast during the May term to study and experience issues related to peace education in the Northern Ireland context. Semester Study Abroad The Office of International Programs at E-town offers a variety of study abroad programs.Office of International Programs Service-Learning Trips Traveling to a new country is not limited to studying. The Center for Community and Civic Engagement posts opportunities for service-trips, which are available to all students on campus.The Center for Community and Civic Engagement Social Justice Opportunities

97 The Education Department Common Book in Social Justice Education students enrolled in their first semester at Elizabethtown College will begin to explore the departments social justice initiative through a common book selection. The departments common book for is Other Peoples Children by Lisa Delpit. Lisa Delpit is Executive Director of the Center for Urban Education and Innovation at Florida International University in Miami. Winner of an American Educational Studies Association Critics Choice Award and Choice Magazines Outstanding Academic book award, and voted one of Teacher Magazines great books, Other Peoples Children has sold over 150,000 copies. In a radical analysis of contemporary classrooms, MacArthur Award–winning author Lisa Delpit develops ideas about ways teachers can be better cultural transmitters in the classroom, where prejudice, stereotypes, and cultural assumptions breed ineffective education. Delpit suggests that many academic problems attributed to children of color are actually the result of miscommunication, as primarily white teachers and other peoples children struggle with the imbalance of power and the dynamics plaguing our system. (The New Press, 2013). A new classic among educators, Other Peoples Children is a must-read for teachers, administrators, and parents striving to improve the quality of Americas education system. 97

98 98 Student Organizations Education majors and other interested students can get involved with an on-campus education club. Eligible education majors can also join an honor society. Education Organization (Ed Org) Ed Org's mission is to provide an atmosphere in which future educators feel safe, accepted and motivated to become successful teachers. The club participates in many social and service activities throughout the year, many times in conjunction with other clubs on campus. These events include literacy nights at the local library, volunteering for the Ronald McDonald House, after-school tutoring, participating in Into the Streets and more. Ed Org also hosts an annual benefit for A-T (ataxia telangiectasia), a progressive, degenerative disease affecting children.Into the Streets Kappa Delta Pi Kappa Delta Pi is an international honor society in education. To be qualified for membership you must have completed 60 hours or more of credits, be a full-time student, have a cumulative GPA of 3.5 and gain department approval. National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) For more information on this organization or to receive information on upcoming events, please 'like' our Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/ECNSTA) or us at The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) is an international community of professionals and network of student chapters that work to improve, through excellence and advocacy, the education and quality of life for children and youth with exceptionalities and to enhance engagement of their families. The Etown student chapter of CEC connects college students across areas of study with individuals with disabilities and their families through service and development activities. For more information, follow CEC on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/etownsped or on the blog at

99 99 Steps to becoming certified at ETOWN Freshman Year: Enroll in and complete English credits (6) and Mathematics requirements (4-6 ) credits Enroll in and successfully complete PAPA Exams in Reading, Writing, and Mathematics Successfully complete Freshman Education Courses Successfully complete Freshman field placement Begin electronic portfolio (e-portfolio) Exhibit professional dispositions Apply for Provisional Acceptance into the program (Spring Semester) Maintain a 2.8 GPA Sophomore Year: Maintain a 2.8 GPA Successfully complete sophomore education courses Successfully complete sophomore field placements Continue electronic portfolio (e-portfolio) Exhibit professional dispositions Apply for Formal Acceptance into the program (Spring Semester)

100 100 Steps to becoming certified at ETOWN Senior Year: Successfully complete PECT or PRAXIS exam in content area according to certification Successfully complete Student Teaching Practicum Exhibit professional dispositions Complete certification I application for teacher certification Graduate Year (5 th Year): Successfully complete PECT in Special Education Successfully complete Student Teaching Practicum in Special Education Complete Masters research project and graduate seminar Exhibit professional dispositions Complete certification I application for teacher certification Junior Year: Maintain a 3.0 GPA Continue electronic portfolio (e-portfolio) Exhibit professional dispositions Successfully complete junior education courses including content methods courses Successfully complete junior field placements Successfully pass PAPA exams (if not already passed) Successfully complete PECT or PRAXIS exam(s) relative to specific certification Apply to 4+1 Masters program in Special Education

101 101 Read ALL s sent to your etown.edu address. This is how the Education Department communicates with you! ALWAYS acknowledge any that requires a response. Remember to take your criminal clearances and TB test to your field placements (the placement site should copy and return originals to you). Clearances and TB test must be updated yearly. Put these numbers in your cellphone: Ms. Shafer: (Education office) Mrs. DeArment: Mrs. Wendling: (Mrs. DeArment Asst.) People and office locations to remember: Dr. Finley-Bowman: Nicarry 144: Chair of Department, for general department questions or concerns Ms. Shafer: Nicarry 143: Department Admin. Assistant, for questions about clearances, for general department questions. Mrs. Wendling: Nicarry 102B: Field Placement Admin. Assistant, for questions about placement,clearances, general field placement questions. Mrs. DeArment: Nicarry 142:Field Placements, for questions about placement or certification requirements. Resource Room Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 9am-5pm (check in at Education office for access) Evening hours: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday : 5:00pm-8:00pm

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109 109 Education Department Manual Acknowledgement Form Please read, sign and return this form to the Education Department Office located in Nicarry 143. I have read and acknowledge receipt of the Department of Education Manual. I understand that if the criteria listed in this manual is not met satisfactorily, I may be denied admission and/or continuation in the Department of Education Professional Teacher Preparation Program and/or denied the opportunity to complete the extensive internship component of the curriculum. I also understand that a $10.00 fee will be charged to my student account for the purchase of this manual. _______________________________________ ____________ Student Signature PRINTED name Date Elizabethtown College Department of Education One Alpha Drive Elizabethtown, PA Phone: (717) Fax: (717)


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