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Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458 All.

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Presentation on theme: "Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458 All."— Presentation transcript:

1 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 1 FIGURE 14–1 Typical parking brake cable system showing the foot-operated parking brake lever and cable routing.

2 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 2 FIGURE 14–2 A typical parking brake pedal assembly.

3 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 3 FIGURE 14–3 Typical hand-operated parking brake. Note that the adjustment for the cable is underneath the vehicle at the equalizer.

4 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 4 FIGURE 14–4 A ratchet mechanism is used to lock parking brakes in the applied position.

5 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 5 FIGURE 14–5 A remote-mounted parking brake release lever.

6 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 6 FIGURE 14–6 Automatic parking brake release mechanisms usually use a vacuum servo to operate the release lever.

7 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 7 FIGURE 14–7 The two plastic vacuum tubes on the steering column are used to release the parking brake when the gear selector is moved from park into a drive gear.

8 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 8 FIGURE 14–8 The cable from the activating lever to the equalizer is commonly called the control cable. From the equalizer, the individual brake cables are often called application cables. These individuals cables can usually be purchased separately.

9 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 9 FIGURE 14–9 Notice how rust inside the covering of this parking brake cable has caused the cable to swell.

10 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 10 FIGURE 14–10 Intermediate levers in the parking brake linkage increase the application force.

11 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 11 FIGURE 14–11 A cable guide is a common type of parking brake linkage equalizer.

12 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 12 FIGURE 14–12 Some parking brake equalizers are installed in the brake cable.

13 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 13 FIGURE 14–13 Many parking brake linkages use both an intermediate lever and an equalizer.

14 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 14 FIGURE 14–14 Notice the spring at the end of the parking brake strut. This antirattle spring keeps tension on the strut. The parking brake lever is usually attached with a pin and spring (wavy) washer and retained by a horseshoe clip.

15 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 15 FIGURE 14–15 The parking brake cable pulls on the parking brake lever, which in turn forces the brake shoe against the drum.

16 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 16 FIGURE 14–16 The inside hat of the disc brake rotor is the friction surface for the parking brake shoes.

17 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 17 FIGURE 14–17 A typical rear disc brake auxiliary drum brake friction assembly.

18 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 18 FIGURE 14–18 A Ford rear brake caliper ball and ramp-type apply mechanism.

19 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 19 FIGURE 14–19 Operation of a ball and ramp-type rear disc brake caliper parking brake.

20 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 20 FIGURE 14–20 Automatic adjustment of a ball and ramptype rear disc brake parking brake occurs when the service brakes are applied.

21 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 21 FIGURE 14–21 A typical General Motors rear disc brake with an integral parking brake. This type uses a screw, nut, and cone mechanism to apply the caliper piston.

22 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 22 FIGURE 14–22 Parking brake application of a General Motors rear drive brake caliper.

23 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 23 FIGURE 14–23 Automatic adjustment of a General Motors rear disc brake caliper.

24 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 24 FIGURE 14–24 Removing the piston from a typical General Motors rear disc brake caliper.

25 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 25 FIGURE 14–25 Installing the piston into a General Motors rear disc brake caliper.

26 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 26 FIGURE 14–26 Installing the piston into a General Motors rear disc brake caliper.

27 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 27 FIGURE 14–27 A spanner wrench (or needle-nose pliers) can be used to rotate the caliper piston prior to installing the disc brake pads. A notch on the piston must line up with a tab on the back of the brake pad to keep the piston from rotating when the parking brake is applied.

28 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 28 FIGURE 14–28 After removing the parking brake lever and thrust bearing, remove the antirotation pin.

29 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 29 FIGURE 14–29 Unscrew the thrust screw from the piston with an Allen (hex) wrench. After removing the thrust screw, push the piston out of the caliper bore.

30 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 30 FIGURE 14–30 To test the piston adjuster, thread the thrust screw into the piston. Hold the piston and pull the thrust screw outward 1/4 in. (6 mm). The adjuster nut should not turn when the thrust screw retracts. Replace the piston assembly if not functioning correctly.

31 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 31 FIGURE 14–31 To adjust the parking brake cable on a Ford vehicle equipped with rear disc brakes, start by loosening the cable adjustment until the cables to the calipers are slack. Tighten until the caliper lever moves. Position a 1/4-in. drill bit or dowel into the caliper alignment hole. Adjustment is correct if the parking brake lever does not hit the 1/4-in. dowel.

32 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 32 FIGURE 14–32 After checking that the rear brakes are okay and properly adjusted, the parking brake cable can be adjusted. Always follow the manufacturers recommended procedure.

33 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 33 FIGURE 14–33 Many hand-operated parking brakes are adjusted inside the vehicle.

34 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 34 FIGURE 14–34 Always check that the brake shoes contact the anchor pin.

35 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 35 FIGURE 14–35 A 1/8-in. (3-mm) drill bit is placed through an access hole in the backing plate to adjust this General Motors leading-trailing rear parking brake. Adjust the parking brake cable until the drill can just fit between the shoe web and the parking brake lever.

36 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 36 FIGURE 14–36 Many parking brake cables can be removed easily from the backing plate using a 1/2-in. (13-mm) box-end wrench. The wrench fits over the retainer finger on the end of the parking brake cable.

37 Automotive Chassis Systems, 5/e By James D. Halderman Copyright © 2010, 2008, 2004, 2000, 1995 Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ All rights reserved. 37 FIGURE 14–37 An electric parking brake button on the center console of a Jaguar.


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