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Savanna Emily Stahlman and Mary Anne Breede Mary Anne Breede.

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Presentation on theme: "Savanna Emily Stahlman and Mary Anne Breede Mary Anne Breede."— Presentation transcript:

1 Savanna Emily Stahlman and Mary Anne Breede Mary Anne Breede

2 Climate Savannas generally have two specific climates: wet (summer) and dry (winter) seasons. During the summer, most of the rainfall occurs. There is an annual precipitation of inches of rain. From December to February (dry season), barely any rainfall occurs. The savanna climate has a temperature range of 68° to 86° F (20° - 30° C). In the winter, it is usually about 68° to 78° F (20° - 25° C). In the summer the temperature ranges from 78° to 86° F (25° - 30° C). Temperatures in the savanna never fall below 20° C.

3 Geography Savannas are located in Africa, Australia, Central America, South America, and Southern Asia. Savannas are located in Africa, Australia, Central America, South America, and Southern Asia. They typically lie between North and 30 ° South. They typically lie between 15 ° North and 30 ° South. 30 South 30 ° South 15 North 15 ° North

4 Native Species Plants Baobab Bermuda Grass Kangaroo Paw Elephant Grass Whistling Thorn Animals African Elephant Lion Giraffe Grevys Zebra Spotted Hyena

5 Invasive Species Dingoes (Canis lupus) Dingoes (Canis lupus) Asian Water Buffalo (Bubalus arnee) Asian Water Buffalo (Bubalus arnee) Donkey (Equus asinus) Donkey (Equus asinus) Pig (Sus scrofa) Pig (Sus scrofa)

6 Major Environmental Concerns Poaching (hunting) Poaching (hunting) Overgrazing by non-native domestic animals Overgrazing by non-native domestic animals Burning of grassland for planting of commercial crops Burning of grassland for planting of commercial crops

7 Unusual Creatures & Features Creatures Aardvark Mole Rat Features Only 10-25% of savannas are actually covered with trees. The rest is covered in grass. Humans have caused the extinction of many animals on the savannas over the past 200 years. The savanna is only home to 40 species of large animals.

8 Relationships with Other Biomes Savannas can be associated with many other types of biomes. Savannas can be associated with many other types of biomes. Savannas are considered transitional zones. Savannas are considered transitional zones. They often occur between forests, deserts, and prairies. They often occur between forests, deserts, and prairies. They provide vegetation for surrounding areas. They provide vegetation for surrounding areas.

9 Kenya Population: 31,639, 091 as of 2008 Religion: Protestant, Roman Catholic, Islam, and others Education- based on system; primary education, secondary school, college Major Industries: Petroleum Refining, Vehicle Assembly, Publishing and Printing Tourism Information: The US strongly suggests that you do not visit Kenya due to violence Major Cities: Nairobi, Mombassa, Kisumu, Nakuru

10 Lion Kingdom: Animalia Kingdom: Animalia Genus: Panthera Genus: Panthera Species: Leo Species: Leo Means of Locomotion: Quadra pedal; walks around 2.4 miles per hour and run miles per hour Means of Locomotion: Quadra pedal; walks around 2.4 miles per hour and run miles per hour

11 Lion Means of reproduction: Lions are considered to be polygynandrous. This means that each male mates with multiple females and each female mates with multiple males Means of reproduction: Lions are considered to be polygynandrous. This means that each male mates with multiple females and each female mates with multiple males Habitat: Tend to live in semi-arid plains and savannah grasslands which are spotted with Acacia trees which provide shade and resting locations for lions. Live in prides that consist of one or two males, up to seven females, and around fifteen cubs. Habitat: Tend to live in semi-arid plains and savannah grasslands which are spotted with Acacia trees which provide shade and resting locations for lions. Live in prides that consist of one or two males, up to seven females, and around fifteen cubs. Behavior/Physical adaptation: golden brown fur allows them to blend in with surroundings and sneak up on preys. The upper surface of a lion's tongue is covered with backward-curved horny papillae, useful for both holding onto meat and removing parasites during grooming. To conserve energy, lions remain inactive up to 21 hours a day. In the darkest, coolest hours of early morning, the lionesses hunt as a team to catch a communal meal. Behavior/Physical adaptation: golden brown fur allows them to blend in with surroundings and sneak up on preys. The upper surface of a lion's tongue is covered with backward-curved horny papillae, useful for both holding onto meat and removing parasites during grooming. To conserve energy, lions remain inactive up to 21 hours a day. In the darkest, coolest hours of early morning, the lionesses hunt as a team to catch a communal meal.

12 Umbrella Thorn Acacia Kingdom: Plantae Kingdom: Plantae Genus: Acacia Genus: Acacia Species: tortillis Species: tortillis

13 Umbrella Thorn Acacia Means of reproduction: Reproduces through Asexual reproduction. It is also considered Perennial which means that it usually lasts for three years and flowers each year. The trees usually grow four to six feet apart from one another. Means of reproduction: Reproduces through Asexual reproduction. It is also considered Perennial which means that it usually lasts for three years and flowers each year. The trees usually grow four to six feet apart from one another. Habitat: occurs from sand dunes and rocky scarps to alluvial valley bottoms, avoiding seasonally waterlogged sites Habitat: occurs from sand dunes and rocky scarps to alluvial valley bottoms, avoiding seasonally waterlogged sites Behavior/Physical adaptation: it can survive drought conditions because it has developed long tap roots that can reach deep, ground water sources. To discourage animals from eating its leaves it developed long, sharp thorns and a symbiotic relationship with stinging ants who live in the hallow thorns. The trees emit chemicals in the air to prevent animals from eating their leaves. Behavior/Physical adaptation: it can survive drought conditions because it has developed long tap roots that can reach deep, ground water sources. To discourage animals from eating its leaves it developed long, sharp thorns and a symbiotic relationship with stinging ants who live in the hallow thorns. The trees emit chemicals in the air to prevent animals from eating their leaves.

14 Works Cited "Savanna Biomes." Blue Planet Biomes. Web. 20 Oct "Savanna Biome." PlantZAfrica.com Homepage. Web. 20 Oct "The grassland biome." UCMP - University of California Museum of Paleontology. Web. 20 Oct "African Savanna - National Zoo| FONZ." Welcome to the National Zoo| FONZ website - National Zoo| FONZ. Web. 20 Oct


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