Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Tamara Roy Blue - 3. A savanna, also known as a tropical grassland, is a type of biome found in areas north and south of the equator, such as central.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Tamara Roy Blue - 3. A savanna, also known as a tropical grassland, is a type of biome found in areas north and south of the equator, such as central."— Presentation transcript:

1 Tamara Roy Blue - 3

2 A savanna, also known as a tropical grassland, is a type of biome found in areas north and south of the equator, such as central and southern central Africa, western Madagascar, eastern India and parts of northern Australia. Savannas are considered the midway area between desert and tropical rainforest biomes. Savannas are grasslands with scattered trees and shrubs because savannas don’t receive enough rain to support full forests. The Serengeti Plains in Tanzania in a well know savanna.

3 Average Yearly Temperature – 68°- 86°F Average Seasonal Temperature – Winter – 68° - 78°F Summer – 78° - 86°F Annual Precipitation – 10 – 30 inches per year

4 ■ Over 40 species of ungulates, or hooved mammals, are found in Savannas. African Elephant – Loxodonta africana herbivore The african elephant roam all over savannas. Since they have no sweat glands, elephants keep cool in the hot savanna weather by pumping their giant ears to fan cool air onto themselves. african-elephant.html n-lion.html African Lion – Panthera leo Carnivore Often referred to as the “king” of the savanna, lions are the most feared predators by other animals of the savanna. Their thick padded feet allow them to walk on the hard savanna terrain without injury.

5 Zebra – Equus burchelli herbivore Grazers of the savanna, Zebras help each other protect themselves from predators by surrounding the animal after its attacked their own, in attempt to ward it off. mals/zebra.html meerkat.html Meerkat – Suricata suricatta omnivore Rodents of the savanna, Meerkats live in large communities that split up jobs, such as look outs and hunters. Impala - Aepyceros melampus herbivore Impalas are medium sized mammals that have agile body made for jumping. They can leap up to 33 feet when escaping predators.

6 Baobab Tree – Adansonia digitata The baobab tree survives the long, hot dry season by storing water in its long, thick roots. Bermuda Grass – Cynodon dactylon Bermuda grass grows well savannas because it grows well in bad soil. The grass also reproduces well after fires, which happen a lot in savannas.

7 _Gum_Sudan_Gum_Arabic_Acacia_senegal_Seeds.html Senegal Gum Acacia – Acacia senegal The senegal gum acacia tree is important to both humans and animals. A number of savanna animals use it as shade and food, and humans use its sap for medicine and food. Umbrella Thorn Acacia Tree – Acacia tortillis The most common and recognizable tree in the savanna, it survives with its deep taproots which grow out to 115 feet underground.

8 hant-conservation829.html Elephant and Rhinosaurous Poaching One of the most invasive effects is the killing of thousands of elephants and rhinosaurouses. People from all over savagely kill and saw off the tusks of the animals to illegally trade and sell. Constant poaching has immensely decreased the population elephants and rhinosaurouses and has put their species at risk for extinction.

9 Overgrazing Many native people inhabit areas around savannas. Overgrazing of their domesticated animals has severely put a dent in the growing of new grass, which in turn leaves little or no grass for wild animals to eat. Widespread Fires While some fires start naturally in the dry, arid savanna weather, many are humanly started. People in towns near savannas accidentally start fires and poaches sometimes start fires to round up animals or cover their tracks.

10 While some people only care about destroying savannas and their animals, other are putting efforts into saving our worlds’ savannas. Organizations have set up national parks in some places to help preserve savannas. In threatened areas, grasses are being replanted to help animals eat and survive. Groups of people are also helping out endangered species by introducing raised animals into the wild in hopes of greater population and survival.

11 African Elephant. Retrieved November 15, 2008, from National Geographic Web site: elephant.html African Lion. Retrieved November 15, 2008, from National Geographic Web site: SLW, (1996, October). Tropical Savanna. Retrieved November 15, 2008, from Radford University Web site: na.html Zebra. Retrieved November 15, 2008, from National geographic Web site: Meerkat. Retrieved November 15, 2008, from National geographic Web site:

12 Impala. Retrieved November 15, 2008, from National geographic Web site: guide/mammals/antelope/impala Savanna. Retrieved November 15, 2008, from Blue Planet Biomes Web site: Savanna Climate. Retrieved November 15, 2008, from Blue Planet Biomes Web site: F., Allison (2000). African Elephant. Retrieved November 15, 2008, from Blue Planet Biomes Web site: S., Chase (2000). Lion. Retrieved November 15, 2008, from Blue Planet Biomes Web site:

13 Senegal Gum Acacia. Retrieved November 15, 2008, from Blue Planet Biomes Web site: Baobab. Retrieved November 15, 2008, from Blue Planet Biomes Web site: Bermuda Grass. Retrieved November 15, 2008, from Blue Planet Biomes Web site: Umbrella Thorn Acacia. Retrieved November 15, 2008, from Blue Planet Biomes Web site: Grassland Biomes. Retrieved November 15, 2008, from World Biomes Web site: Grassland -- Human Impacts on Grassland. Retrieved November 16, 2008, from ThinkQuest Web site:


Download ppt "Tamara Roy Blue - 3. A savanna, also known as a tropical grassland, is a type of biome found in areas north and south of the equator, such as central."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google