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Social Welfare Policy and Underlying Values Chapter 1.

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Presentation on theme: "Social Welfare Policy and Underlying Values Chapter 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 Social Welfare Policy and Underlying Values Chapter 1

2 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Social Work Code of Ethics Section 6 Social Workers should promote the general welfare of society

3 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Social Work Code of Ethics Section 6.04 (a) Social Workers should be aware of the impact of the political arena on practice and should advocate for changes in policy and legislation to improve social conditions in order to meet basic human needs and promote social justice.

4 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Social Welfare Let break it down 1. Social – U.S. society in our collective nature 2. Welfare – well-being, state of healthy balance

5 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Social Welfare Together they mean Well being of society

6 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Why Study Social Welfare? It is about us We are both – providers recipients To understand the social welfare system As citizens we are policy makers To understand the influence that values and beliefs have on social welfare policies and systems

7 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Social Welfare Systems Social Issues Policy Goals Legislation/regulation Programs

8 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Questions to ask Who gets the services? Why do they get the services? What do they receive? How do they receive services? What does it cost? Who pays for it? Eligibility Program Goals Benefits Service Delivery System Cost Analysis Financing

9 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Purpose of a Social Welfare System To provide a safety net of emergency services To provide services that cannot be effectively provided on an individual basis

10 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Policy Development Residual Calls for organized public interventions when the normal resources of family and the market place breakdown Social services are required when a problem cannot be address by individual resources

11 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Policy Development Institutional Social welfare programs are seen as a normal part of the social structure Institutional social welfare policy see providing service as a legitimate function of society

12 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Provision of Services Universality – Social services that provide benefits to all members of society, regardless of income and means Selectivity – Services are restricted to those who can demonstrate need through eligibility criteria

13 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Social Welfare Policy Blend Residual Universal – Federal Emergency Management Act – FEMA Selective – Cash Assistance, Food Stamps, and Medicaid

14 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Social Welfare Policy Blend Institutional Universal – Public Education Fire and police protection Selective – Social Security Medicare

15 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Values and Beliefs A value is the worth, desirability,or usefulness placed on something A belief is an opinion or conviction Both have shifting impact on social welfare policy

16 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Religious Values Development of social welfare services can be traced to values reflected in the dominant religions of our country Goals of religious charitable efforts were to uphold moral character, maintain humbleness, and help those who are less fortunate

17 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Social Values Two competing yet strong social values that shape policy are: – Social responsibility and citizenship – Hard work and self-sufficiency

18 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Competing Beliefs Undeserving Individual Responsibility Individual Change Self-sufficiency Entitlement Aid to Those we Know Deserving Social Responsibility Social Change Social Support Handout Aid Stranger

19 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education Competing Beliefs Religious and Faith Based Practice Crisis Response Sympathy Trust Rationality Separation of Church and State Prevention Empathy Suspicion Emotions

20 Social Welfare Policy and Social Programs: A Values Perspective, by Elizabeth Segal Copyright 2007, Brooks/Cole, a division of Thomson Higher Education For Consideration U.S. beliefs that we all have freedom of choice Do we all really have freedom to choose how we live our lives? How does that create social injustice? How do social welfare polices and programs assist in providing choices?


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