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123 Go To Section: LAW OF DEMAND Price Demand As the price of a product increases, consumers buy less of a product ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ As the price of a.

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Presentation on theme: "123 Go To Section: LAW OF DEMAND Price Demand As the price of a product increases, consumers buy less of a product ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ As the price of a."— Presentation transcript:

1 123 Go To Section: LAW OF DEMAND Price Demand As the price of a product increases, consumers buy less of a product ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ As the price of a product decreases, consumers buy more of a product increases

2 123 Go To Section: Quantity Demanded vs. Demand Quantity Demanded and Demand sound alike but they are two very different concepts. Quantity Demand: The amount of a good or service people are willing and able to buy at a particular price, other things being equal. Demand: Demand is the entire schedule

3 123 Go To Section: The Demand Schedule A demand schedule is a table that lists the quantity of a good a person will buy at each different price. Chapter 4, Section 1 A market demand schedule is a table that lists the quantity of a good all consumers in a market will buy at each different price. Demand Schedules Individual Demand Schedule Price of a slice of pizza Quantity demanded per day Market Demand Schedule Price of a slice of pizza Quantity demanded per day $.50 $1.00 $1.50 $2.00 $2.50 $ $.50 $1.00 $1.50 $2.00 $2.50 $ jf What is the difference between a market and individual demand schedule?

4 123 Go To Section: The Demand Curve Market Demand Curve Slices of pizza per day Price per slice (in dollars) Demand Chapter 4, Section 1 A demand curve is a graphical representation of a demand schedule. Three characteristics of every demand curve: 1.Downward sloping 2.Must assume ceteris paribus 3.Relationship between price and quantity What is the one factor that causes a shift in the quantity demanded? PRICE!!

5 123 Go To Section: Movement along the demand curve is a result in a consumer changing their behavior based on a change in price. Increase in quantity demanded is demonstrated by moving down the demand curve Decrease in quantity demanded is demonstrated by moving up the demand curve Why cant a change in demand from other factors be demonstrated by moving along the demand curve?

6 123 Go To Section: Shifting the Whole Demand Curve Chapter 4, Section What else do you think could influence YOUR demand for a product?

7 123 Go To Section: Shifting the Curve (cont.) Complements are two goods that are bought and used together. Example: skis and ski boots Substitutes are goods used in place of one another. Example: skis and snowboards #5: Price of Related Goods The demand curve for one good can be affected by a change in the demand for another good

8 123 Go To Section: Shifting the Curve (cont.) An increase in demand is shown by moving the demand curve to the right –What would cause an increase in demand? A decrease in demand is shown by moving the demand curve to the left? –What would cause a decrease in demand? ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

9 123 Go To Section: What Is Elasticity of Demand? Demand for a good that consumers will continue to buy despite a price increase is inelastic. Elasticity of demand is a measure of how consumers react to a change in price. Demand for a good that is very sensitive to changes in price is elastic. Chapter 4, Section Why would a prescription drug, like insulin, have inelastic demand for a person with diabetes?

10 123 Go To Section: Factors Affecting Elasticity Chapter 4, Section What are some other factors that you feel could impact a consumers response to a change in the price of a product?

11 123 Go To Section: Market Supply Curve Price (in dollars) Output (slices per day) Supply Supply Curves Characteristics of a Supply Curve 1.Relationship between price and quantity supplied 2.Always upward sloping 3.Must have ceteris paribus (all things held constant) to exist A market supply curve is a graph of the quantity supplied of a good by all suppliers at different prices

12 123 Go To Section: Price As price increases… Supply Quantity supplied increases Price As price falls… Supply Quantity supplied falls The Law of Supply According to the law of supply, as price increases, supply increases. By contrast as price decreases, supply decreases.

13 123 Go To Section: How Does the Law of Supply Work? Economists use the term quantity supplied to describe how much of a good is offered for sale at a specific price. Just like demand, quantity supplied indicates movement along the supply curve, because ONLY price is being considered (ceteris paribus). Why do suppliers produce more as the price increases? produce more 1.The promise of increased revenues when prices are high encourages firms to produce more. The more you can make, the more you will produce! new firms 2.Rising prices draw new firms into a market and add to the quantity supplied of a good. Higher Production + Market Entry = Law of Supply More $$$$-- More Supply!

14 123 Go To Section: $.501,000 Price per slice of pizzaSlices supplied per day Market Supply Schedule $1.001,500 $1.502,000 $2.002,500 $2.503,000 $3.003,500 Supply Schedules A market supply schedule is a chart that lists how much of a good all suppliers will offer at different prices. What would an individual supply schedule list?

15 123 Go To Section: Input Costs and Supply Any change in the cost of an input such as the raw materials, machinery, or labor used to produce a good, will affect supply. As input costs increase, the firms marginal costs also increase, decreasing profitability and supply. Input costs can also decrease. New technology can greatly decrease costs and increase supply.

16 123 Go To Section: Government Influences on Supply By raising or lowering the cost of producing goods, the government can encourage or discourage an entrepreneur or industry. Subsidies A subsidy is a government payment that supports a business or market. Subsidies cause the supply of a good to increase. Taxes The government can reduce the supply of some goods by placing an excise tax on them. An excise tax is a tax on the production or sale of a good.

17 123 Go To Section: Other Factors Influencing Supply Number of Suppliers –If more firms enter a market, the market supply of the good will rise. If firms leave the market, supply will decrease. The Global Economy –The supply of imported goods and services has an impact on the supply of the same goods and services here. –Government import restrictions will cause a decrease in the supply of restricted goods.

18 123 Go To Section: Elasticity of supply is a measure of the way quantity supplied reacts to a change in price. Elasticity of Supply If supply is not very responsive to changes in price, it is considered inelastic. If supply is very sensitive to changes in price it is considered elastic. Why cant I respond to a change in price for trees, but I can for taxi rides? Elastic

19 123 Go To Section: Time What Affects Elasticity of Supply?

20 Presentation Pro Essential Questions: Chapter 6 Chapter 6: Prices

21 123 Go To Section: Price per slice Equilibrium Point Finding Equilibrium Price of a slice of pizza Quantity demanded Quantity supplied Result Combined Supply and Demand Schedule $ $3.50 $3.00 $2.50 $2.00 $1.50 $1.00 $.50 Slices of pizza per day Supply Demand The point at which quantity demanded and quantity supplied come together is known as equilibrium. $2.00 $2.50 $ Surplus from excess supply $ Equilibrium Equilibrium Price a Equilibrium Quantity $ Shortage from excess demand Balancing the Market Supply + Demand = Equilibrium

22 123 Go To Section: If the market price or quantity supplied is anywhere but at the equilibrium price, the market is in a state called disequilibrium. There are two causes for disequilibrium: Market Disequilibrium Excess Demand Excess demand occurs when quantity demanded is more than quantity supplied. Shortage Excess Supply Excess supply occurs when quantity supplied exceeds quantity demanded. Surplus Interactions between buyers and sellers will always push the market back towards equilibrium.

23 123 Go To Section: Price Ceilings A price ceiling is a maximum price that can be legally charged for a good. An example of a price ceiling is rent control, a situation where a government sets a maximum amount that can be charged for rent in an area.

24 123 Go To Section: Price Floors A price floor is a minimum price, set by the government, that must be paid for a good or service. One well-known price floor is the minimum wage, which sets a minimum price that an employer can pay a worker for an hour of labor.

25 123 Go To Section: Prices provide a language for buyers and sellers. 1. Prices as an Incentive Prices communicate to both buyers and sellers whether goods or services are scarce or easily available. Prices can encourage or discourage production. 2. Signals Think of prices as a traffic light. A relatively high price is a green light telling producers to make more. A relatively low price is a red light telling producers to make less. 3. Flexibility In many markets, prices are much more flexible than production levels. They can be easily increased or decreased to solve problems of excess supply or excess demand. 4. Price System is "Free" Unlike central planning, a distribution system based on prices costs nothing to administer. Advantages of Prices


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