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Doctoral Candidate: Ed Jennings Committee Members: Jaclyn Krause, PhD, Chair Kenneth Cromer, PhD, Committee Member Connie Greiner, EdD, Committee Member.

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Presentation on theme: "Doctoral Candidate: Ed Jennings Committee Members: Jaclyn Krause, PhD, Chair Kenneth Cromer, PhD, Committee Member Connie Greiner, EdD, Committee Member."— Presentation transcript:

1 Doctoral Candidate: Ed Jennings Committee Members: Jaclyn Krause, PhD, Chair Kenneth Cromer, PhD, Committee Member Connie Greiner, EdD, Committee Member University of Phoenix School of Advanced Studies 1

2 Researchers Background Topic Background Key Terms Problem Statement Significance of the Study Research Questions Theoretical Framework Methodology 2

3 Population Results Significance of the Study to Leadership Recommendations for Future Research Next Steps References Thank You Questions and Answers 3

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5 Saturation of cell phones The first coupon was introduced in % of the food budget was spent on meals outside of the home Restaurant Promotions 5

6 Performance Expectancy (PE): The degree to which mobile coupons assist individuals in completing their goal of dining out while saving money. Effort Expectancy (EE): The level of ease or difficulty in using a new technology. Social Influence (SI): The belief that others who are important to them believe they should be using mobile coupons. Opting-In (OI): A permission-based marketing tactic that asks users for permission to send something of value. Fear of Spam (FS): Concern regarding Intrusive advertising delivered to a users cell phone. Behavioral Intention (BI): The degree to which an individual plans to perform a behavior. 6

7 General Problem: Less than one percent of traditional printed coupons are redeemed and little research exists on the behavioral intentions of consumers to use mobile coupons for restaurant purchases. Specific Problem Studied The behavioral intention of young adults to use mobile coupons for casual restaurant dining. Performance Expectancy Effort Expectancy Social Influence Opt-InFear of Spam 7

8 This study is significant at the organizational and academic levels. 8

9 RQ1: What is the relationship between performance expectancy and the behavioral intention to redeem mobile coupons in a casual dining restaurant environment? H o 1: There is no relationship between performance expectancy and the behavioral intention to use mobile coupons in a casual dining restaurant environment. H a 1: There is a relationship between performance expectancy and the behavioral intention to use mobile coupons in a casual dining restaurant environment. RQ2: What is the relationship between effort expectancy and the behavioral intention to redeem mobile coupons in a casual dining restaurant environment? H o 1: There is no relationship between performance expectancy and the behavioral intention to use mobile coupons in a casual dining restaurant environment. H a 1: There is a relationship between performance expectancy and the behavioral intention to use mobile coupons in a casual dining restaurant environment. RQ3: What is the relationship between social influence and the behavioral intention to redeem mobile coupons in a casual dining restaurant environment? H o 3: There is no relationship between social influence and the behavioral intention to use mobile coupons in a casual dining restaurant environment. H a 3: There is a relationship between social influence and the behavioral intention to use mobile coupons in a casual dining restaurant environment. 9

10 RQ4: What is the relationship between opting-in and the behavioral intention to redeem mobile coupons in a casual dining restaurant environment? H o 4: There is no relationship between opting-in and the behavioral intention to use mobile coupons in the casual dining restaurant environment. H a 4: There is a relationship between opting-in and the behavioral intention to use mobile coupons in the casual dining restaurant environment. RQ5: What is the relationship between the fear of spam and the behavioral intention to redeem mobile coupons in a casual dining restaurant environment? H o 5: There is no relationship between the fear of spam and the behavioral intention to use mobile coupons in the casual dining restaurant environment. H a 5: There is a relationship between the fear of spam and the behavioral intention to use mobile coupons in the casual dining restaurant environment. 10

11 Theory of Reasoned Action Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980 Social Cognition Theory Bandura, 1982 Technology Acceptance Model F. Davis, 1989 Theory of Planned Behavior Ajzen, 1991 Model of Personal Computer Utilization Thompson, Higgins, & Howell, 1991 Innovation Diffusion Theory Rogers, 1995 Motivational Model Ballerand, 1997 Intrusive Advertising Edwards, Li & Lee, 2002 Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use Technology Venkatesh, Morris, Davis, & Davis, 2003 Permission Based Marketing Jayawardhena, et al., 2009 Permission to Interact in the Mobile Space Rohm & Sultan, 2006 Fear of Spam in Wireless Coupons Dickinger & Kleijnen,

12 Quantitative Cross Correlational study Measuring the Potential Relationships Between Five Antecedents and Behavioral Intention The Questionnaire Consisted of Tools From: Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use Technology, Opt-In and SPAM 12

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15 Have You Previously Received a Text Message Coupon? Yes = 42.07% No = 57.93% Have You Previously Redeemed a Text Message Coupon? Yes = 27.44% No = 72.56% Do You Currently Use Text Messaging? Yes = 98.17% No = 1.83% 15

16 Independent VariableKendall tau-bSpearmanGamma PE.547**.674**.615** EE.478**.589**.538** SI.409**.532**.461** Opt-In.522**.658**.582** Fear P =.237P =.256P =.265 Independent Variable Correlations with Behavioral Intention from Kendall Tau-b, Spearman, and Gamma tests Note. ** Correlation is significant at the.001 level. n = 328. Note 2: The probability value was compared to the alpha value established at.05 to determine whether the null hypothesis was accepted or rejected 16

17 Independent VariablePearsonSpearman PE.682**.674** EE.611**.589** SI.512**.532** Opt-In.680**.658** Fear p =.459p =.256 Independent Variable Correlations with Behavioral Intention from Pearson and Spearman tests Note. ** Correlation is significant at the.001 level. n = 328. Note 2: The probability value was compared to the alpha value established at.05 to determine whether the null hypothesis was accepted or rejected 17

18 The results using Spearman, Gamma and Kendall tau-b were consistent and compared to Pearsons Correlation Tests were selected and appropriate for non-normalized data The Spearman Correlation was used to determine whether a relationship existed and the strength of the relationship between the independent variable and dependent variable 18

19 A significant positive relationship exists between performance expectancy and behavioral intention A significant positive relationship exists between effort expectancy and behavioral intention A significant positive relationship exists between social influence and behavioral intention A significant positive relationship exists between Opt-In and behavioral intention No relationship existed between fear of spam an behavioral intention 19

20 To Groupon or Not to Groupon? Marketing Strategy Customer Loyalty Creativity 20

21 Testing More Age Groups Institutional Trust Location, Time of Day and Search Based Coupons Applied Research to a Corporate Chain Creative Value Propositions 21

22 Publish Continue Teaching Starting a Business – Be so good they cant avoid you. 22

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24 Ajzen, I. (1991). The theory of planned behavior. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 50(2), Retrieved from Ajzen, I., & Fishbein, M. (1980). Understanding attitudes and predicting social behavior. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Bandura, A. (1982). Self-efficacy mechanism in human agency. American Psychologist, 37(2), doi: / X Davis, F. D. (1989). Perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and user acceptance of information technology. MIS Quarterly, 13(3), doi: / Dickinger, A., & Kleijnen, M. (2008). Coupons going wireless: Determinants of consumer intentions to redeem mobile coupons. Journal of Interactive Marketing, 22(3), doi: /dir Edwards, S., Li, H., & Lee, J. (2002). Forced exposure and psychological reactance: Antecedents and consequences of the perceived intrusiveness of pop-up ads. Journal of Advertising, 31(3), doi: / Jayawardhena, C., Kuckertz, A., Karjaluoto, H., & Kautonen, T. (2009). Antecedents to permission based mobile marketing: An initial examination. European Journal of Marketing, 43(3/4), doi: / Rogers, E. (1995). Diffusion of innovations. New York, NY: Free Press. Rohm, A., & Sultan, F. (2006). An exploratory cross-market study of mobile marketing acceptance. International Journal of Mobile Marketing, 1(1), Retrieved from mobile-marketinghttp://www.mmaglobal.com/resources/international-journal- Thompson, R. L., Higgins, C. A., & Howell, J. M. (1991). Personal computing: Toward a conceptual model of utilization. MIS Quarterly, 15(1), Retrieved from Tsang, M., Ho, S., & Liang, T. (2004). Consumer attitudes toward mobile advertising: An empirical study. International J ournal of Electronic Commerce, 8(3), Retrieved from Vallerand, R. J. (1997). Toward a hierarchical model of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 29(1), doi: /S (08) /S (08) Venkatesh, V., Morris, M., Davis, G., & Davis, F. (2003). User acceptance of information technology: Toward a unified view. MIS Quarterly, 27(3), Retrieved from 24


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