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Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–1 Chapter 11Attitude and Attitude Change What.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–1 Chapter 11Attitude and Attitude Change What."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–1 Chapter 11Attitude and Attitude Change What are attitudes? Main components of attitudes Strategies that can be used to change attitudes Effect of marketing communication on attitudes Strategic implications of attitudes

2 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–2 Attitudes Attitude components – cognitive – affective – behavioural Component consistency Measurement of attitude components

3 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–3 Definition of Attitude An attitude is a learned predisposition to respond in a consistently positive or negative way to a given object or event.

4 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–4 Terminology Favourability: the positive or negative evaluation of the object or event Intensity: the strength with which the consumer can hold an attitude Confidence: the degree to which the consumer believes their attitude is right

5 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–5 Components of an Attitude Cognitive Affective Behavioural

6 11–6 Attitude Components and Manifestations

7 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–7 Cognitive Component Consists of the consumers beliefs and knowledge about the attributes of a particular brand, product or outlet – many beliefs relate to the evaluation of attributes – the cognitive component represents the summation of evaluations – multi-attribute model

8 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–8 Affective Component Represents the consumers feelings or emotional reaction to a product – Based on experience or cognitive information – Response is person-situation specific – Cultural influence

9 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–9 Behavioural Component Represents the consumers tendency (intention) to respond in a particular way towards the object or event – Behaviour – Intention – Situational influence

10 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–10 Component Consistency The three components of an attitude (cognitive, affective and behavioural) have a tendency to be consistent. A change in one component will have a flow-on effect on the other components.

11 11–11 Attitude-Component Consistency

12 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–12 Measurement of Attitude Components As components of attitude are an integral part of a marketing strategy, it is important to be able to measure each component.

13 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–13 Measuring Attitude Components Cognitive Component (Measuring Beliefs about Specific Attributes Using the Semantic Differential Scale) Diet Coke Strong taste ____________________________Mild taste Low priced____________________________High priced Caffeine free____________________________High in caffeine Distinctive in____________________________Similar in taste taste to most

14 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–14 Measuring Attitude Components (cont.) Affective Component (Measuring Feelings about Specific Attributes Using Likert Scales) Neither Agree Stronglynor Strongly AgreeAgree Disagree Disagree Disagree Disagree I like the taste of Diet____________________ Coke. Diet Coke is overpriced.____________________ Caffeine is bad for your ____________________ health. I like Diet Coke. ____________________

15 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–15 Measuring Attitude Components (cont.) Behavioral Component (Measuring Actions or Intended Actions) Have you ever purchased Diet Coke? Yes How often?___ No What is the likelihood you will buy Diet Coke the next time you purchase a soft drink? Definitely will buy Probably will buy Might buy Probably will not buy Definitely will not buy

16 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–16 Attitude-Change Strategies Changing or establishing an attitude requires manipulation of one or more of the components of the attitude (i.e. cognitive, affective or behavioural)

17 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–17 Strategies Based on Attitudes Market segmentation – benefit segmentation Product development

18 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–18 Attitude-Change Strategies Changing the affective component – classical conditioning – affect towards the advertisement – mere exposure Changing the behavioural component Changing the cognitive component – four basic strategies

19 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–19 Attitude-Change Strategies (cont.) Affective component – Classical conditioning – Positive affect towards the advertisement – Mere exposure

20 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–20 Attitude-Change Strategies (cont.) Change affective component – Involves changing the consumers feel about a product, without necessarily directly influencing their beliefs or behaviour

21 11–21 Attitude Change in Ads

22 11–22 Attitude Change in Ads (cont.)

23 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–23 Attitude-Change Strategies Change behavioural component – Alter the purchase behaviour or consumption behaviour directly, which may in turn lead to a change in belief or affect – Change in beliefs or improved knowledge base will have subsequent influence on affect and behaviour

24 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–24 Attitude-Change Strategies (cont.) Change behavioural component – Operant conditioning Sampling (trialing)

25 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–25 Strategies Used for Altering the Cognitive Component Change in beliefs or improved knowledge base will have a subsequent influence on affect and behaviour – Change the beliefs about the attributes of the brand – Change the relative importance of these beliefs – Add new beliefs – Change the beliefs about the attributes of the ideal brand

26 11–26 Adding a New Belief

27 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–27 Communication and Attitude Change Source characteristics – source credibilitytrustworthiness and expertise – celebrity sources

28 11–28 Matching Endorser with Product and Target Audience

29 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–29 Communication and Attitude Change Appeal Characteristics – Fear (unpleasant consequences if attitude and/or behaviour is not altered) – Humour – Comparative advertisement (comparing attributes of focus brand to those of competitor) – Emotional (message is constructed to elicit a positive response/feeling rather than provide information)

30 11–30 Ad Seeking an Emotional Response

31 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–31 Communication and Attitude Change Message-structure characteristics – one-sided versus two-sided messages – non-verbal components

32 Copyright 2004 McGraw-Hill Australia Pty Ltd PPTs t/a Consumer Behaviour 4e by Neal, Quester, Hawkins 11–32 Next Lecture… Chapter 12: Australasian Society: Demographics and Lifestyles


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