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Mentoring As a Judicial Sanction: Assessing Sense of Belonging Wendy Young Assistant Director, Judicial Affairs Sara Finney, Ph.D. Assistant Professor.

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Presentation on theme: "Mentoring As a Judicial Sanction: Assessing Sense of Belonging Wendy Young Assistant Director, Judicial Affairs Sara Finney, Ph.D. Assistant Professor."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mentoring As a Judicial Sanction: Assessing Sense of Belonging Wendy Young Assistant Director, Judicial Affairs Sara Finney, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Graduate Psychology; Assistant Assessment Specialist

2 Freedom Didnt realize it was a policy Rebellion Attention-Seeking behavior This program focuses on attention-seeking What are some REASONS that students violate policies?

3 Theory to Guide Program Academic success and personal growth is positively correlated with: INVOLVEMENT IN WORK INVOLVEMENT WITH FACULTY Academic Involvement Academic Involvement Involvement with Student Peers Involvement with Student Peers Other involvement Other involvement Astin, Alexander W. (1993). What Matters in College. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

4 Astins Work Applied to This Program Student-faculty interaction has significant positive correlations with every academic attainment outcome: college GPA, degree attainment, graduating with honors and enrollment in graduate or professional school. Student-faculty interaction also has positive correlations…with a variety of personality and attitudinal outcomes: scholarship, social activism, leadership, artistic inclination, and commitment to each of three life goals: promoting racial understanding, participating in programs to clean up the environment and making theoretical contributions to science. Astin, Alexander W. (1993). What Matters in College. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

5 Astins Work Applied to This Program Holding a part-time job on campus is positively associated with attainment of a bachelors degree and with virtually all areas of self-reported cognitive and affective growth. Working at a part-time job on campus increases the students chances of being elected to a student office, tutoring other students, and attending recitals or concerts. It has positive effects on Liberalism, Leadership, and a commitment to the goals of promoting racial understanding and participating in programs to clean up the environment. Astin, Alexander W. (1993). What Matters in College. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

6 Civic LearningA History James Madison Universitys Mission We are a community committed to preparing students to be educated and enlightened citizens who lead productive and meaningful lives. Judicial Affairs Mission We are committed to promoting student learning, civic responsibility and, through partnerships, developing the community necessary for the university to achieve its mission.

7 Civic LearningA History Prior to 2005: Service learning---student was assigned hours to work in an office on campus; reflection was done with one facilitator & 2 other student participants No formal mentoring No formal assessment No consistent treatment; no formal training of facilitators. Civic Learning did not exist

8 Civic Learning Definitions for Program Civic Learning: the growth and development for citizenship that results for students from civic engagement of all kinds Civic Engagement: wide range of learning activities within or part of the institution…that engages the institution in partnership with its civic contexts Service Learning: educational activity carried out in partnership with a public or non-profit agency, organization, or project in the community Mentoring/Coaching: Unlocking a persons potential to maximize their own performance. It is helping them to learn rather than teaching them References: Coaching a Diverse Workforce; (Leading with questions); Coaching for Performance, Whitmore, John

9 Civic LearningYear One ( ) Program Description: Sanctioned students are assigned to an on campus site for hours AND are given a mentor for 15 sessions. The program is designed to assist students in becoming more involved on campus. (Note: 9 students were given mentoring only due to not having an available site & the students desire to have this type of assistance.) Goals and Objectives: 1. Students will increase their level of connection/belonging to the university. Upon completion of the civic learning sanctioned program students will: Significantly increase their Sense of Belongingness Be able to do at least one of the following: Identify at least two academic/student assistance resources at JMU that they were not aware of prior to participating in the program. Report using at least one academic/student assistance resource that they had not used prior to the program. Identify at least two new clubs/organizations that they would consider participating in. Report attending at least one university sponsored event that they learned about through the civic learning program. 2. Student will identify their civic responsibilities within the university community. Identify at least three civic responsibilities they have within the university community.

10 Civic LearningYear One ( ) Program Procedures: Hearing officer sanctions student to a specific amount of hours Hearing officer fills out the overview sheet (which contains general information and any points that must be notes) Hearing officer walks student to the Resource Center. Office Assistant or PA gives student the brochure and explains that it is an overview of the program. PA schedules an intake interview with the Coordinator of Civic Learning. Prior to the intake interview, the student completes the Belongingness assessment. During the intake interview, the Coordinator asks questions and generates discussion to discover the students interests and needs. The Coordinator assigns a site and mentor. The Coordinator will explain all of the program requirements (acts as a contract) and then the student will sign contract. Assessment Procedures: Only assessed Sense of Belongingness (SB) Pre-post design Pilot study of program

11 Civic LearningYear One ( ) Assessment Results N = 29 participated 76% Male 46% 1 st year, 29% Soph, 21% Junior Sense of Belongingness increased 6 point gain on scale with range (8.3% gain) Largest increase for those with only mentoring hours (~9pt) Use of Results Added mentoring only as a sanctioning option (15 sessions if mentoring only) Set up a plan to investigate if differential gains in SB would replicate or if its just a function of sampling error Received internal grant to support continued study of program

12 Note : a Test of mean difference was statistically (t = 4.36, p <.001) and practically significant (d =.84). Row in WHITE represents total sample of students. Row in YELLOW indicate results from students that completed ONLY mentoring hours. Row in GREEN indicate results from students that completed community service hours. Row in GRAY indicate results from students that completed more than 34 community service hours. α Pre-Test Mean (SD) Pre-Test Sample Size α Post-Test Mean (SD) Post-Test Difference in Mean Scores (8.80) (9.51)5.96 a (5.94) (9.53) (9.91) (10.76) (8.80) (9.51)4.36 Total Scale Means by Type & Amount of Activity ( )

13 Civic LearningYear One ( ) Assessment Results N = 29 participated 76% Male 46% 1 st year, 29% Soph, 21% Junior Sense of Belongingness increased 6 point gain on scale with range (8.3% gain) Largest increase for those with only mentoring hours (~9pt) Use of Results Added mentoring only as a sanctioning option (15 sessions if mentoring only) Set up a plan to investigate if differential gains in SB would replicate or if its just a function of sampling error Received internal grant to support continued study of program

14 Civic LearningYear Two ( ) Goals/Objectives Re-assessed change in SB given change in the program. Spent the year re-visiting remaining goals Looking at match of goals with new program Issues surrounding future assessment implementation and needs Program Procedures Same general procedures of implementation & goals and objectives as used in assigning students to program Implementation of program changed based on assessment results: More intentional training of mentors Number of mentoring hours (8, 10, 12, or 15 sessions OR mentoring only15 sessions) Assignment of students to sites and mentors

15 Civic LearningYear Two ( ): Assignment to Program Low Challenge/Low Mentoring Very busy schedule Belongs to at least 1 JMU org. Good understanding of personal mission and goals Site Hours: Mentoring Sessions: 8 or 10 Moderate Challenge/Low Mentoring Not involved/lots of free time Good understanding of personal mission and goals May be a repeat offender Site Hours: Mentoring Sessions: 8 or 10 Moderate Challenge/High Mentoring Very busy schedule Belongs to at least 1 JMU org. Poor understanding of personal mission and goals Not well-adjusted/homesick Site Hours: Mentoring Sessions: 12 or 15 High Challenge/High Mentoring Not involved/lots of free time Poor understanding of personal mission and goals May be a repeat offender Not well-adjusted/homesick Site Hours: 0 or Mentoring Sessions: 12 or 15 or Mentoring Only

16 Civic LearningYear Two ( ) Goals/Objectives Re-assessed change in SB given change in the program. Spent the year re-visiting remaining goals Looking at match of goals with new program Issues surrounding future assessment implementation and needs Program Procedures Same general procedures of implementation & goals and objectives as used in assigning students to program Implementation of program changed based on assessment results: More intentional training of mentors Number of mentoring hours (8, 10, 12, or 15 sessions OR mentoring only15 sessions) Assignment of students to sites and mentors

17 Civic LearningYear Two ( ) Assessment Results N = 35 participated 66% Male 60% 1 st year, 26% Soph, 6% Junior SB increased 4.66 point gain (6.5% gain) Differential increase given different treatment Mentoring only had largest effect, but not as extreme as previous year Examined both years together to get better idea of program impact (more stable estimates) Use of Results SB changing Most change related to mentoring only Differential growth could be a function of the treatment OR type of student Turn focus on to assessing other objectives New Civic Learning Coordinator position provided to office

18 Year α Pre-Test Sample Size Mean (SD) Pre-Test α Post-Test Mean (SD) Post-Testt Effect Size 2006 – (10.61) (7.54)2.74* – (8.80) (9.51)4.36** (10.00) (8.57)4.74**.62 Reliabilities & Total Scale Means Across Two Years * p <.01; **p <.001; effect size is Cohens d for repeated measures

19 Rows in YELLOW indicate results from students that completed ONLY mentoring hours. Rows in GREEN indicate results from students that completed community service hours. Rows in GRAY indicate results from students that completed more than 34 community service hours. YEAR α Pre-Test Mean (SD) Pre-Test Sample Size α Post-Test Mean (SD) Post-Test Difference in Mean Scores (10.92) (7.20) (5.66) (7.07) (9.31) (8.09) (5.94) (9.53) (9.91) (10.76) (8.80) (9.51) (9.72) (7.84) (12.51) (11.26) (9.67) (8.08)4.73 Total Scale Means Across Two Years by Type & Amount of Activity

20 Civic LearningYear Two ( ) Assessment Results N = 35 participated 66% Male 60% 1 st year, 26% Soph, 6% Junior SB increased 4.66 point gain (6.5% gain) Differential increase given different treatment Mentoring only had largest effect, but not as extreme as previous year Examined both years together to get better idea of program impact (more stable estimates) Use of Results SB increasing Most change related to mentoring only Differential growth could be a function of the treatment OR type of student New Civic Learning Coordinator position provided to office Turn focus on to assessing other objectives

21 Civic Learning,Year Three( ): Assessment Activities Goal: Students will increase their level of connection and/or belonging to the university. ObjectivesActivitiesAssessment As a function of the Civic Learning program, students will report a significant increase in their sense of belonging at the university. We expect a higher increase for those working with a mentor (5 point increase) than those only working with a site (2 point increase). Mentoring: Why College?, free conversation, attend reflection meetings, site hours, attend mentoring meetings Sites: Sense of Belonging instrument (pre/post) As a function of the Civic Learning program, students will be able to list 3 ways to find information about JMU- sponsored programs/events and describe at least 3 benefits associated with attending these types of activities. Mentoring: Things to Do at JMU, field trip, site hours, Motivation and Goal- setting worksheet Sites: Reflection Paper; GA qualitative exit interview (both scored using rubrics to be created) As a function of the Civic Learning program, students will be able to list and apply university resources to potential student needs. Mentoring: Things to Do at JMU, field trip, site hours, Motivation and Goal- Setting Worksheet Sites: Reflection Paper (scenarios); GA qualitative exit interview (both scored using rubrics to be created) As a function of the Civic Learning program, students will show an increase in positive regard for administrators, faculty, and other JMU students. Function of total programReflection Paper (to be scored using rubric to be created) As a function of the Civic Learning program, students will be less likely to leave JMU. Function of total ProgramAnalysis of transfer information As a function of the Civic Learning program, students will be more likely to increase help-seeking behavior. Function of total ProgramHelp-seeking instrument (pre/post)

22 Civic Learning, Year Three ( ) Projects to Implement or Develop: Continue to re-visit our goals/objectives Continue to improve program Focus on sites Training & recruitment of supervisors Incorporating reflection for site work in order to create more intentional purpose for the site.

23 Questions?

24 Wendy Young Assistant Director James Madison University Judicial Affairs Sara Finney Assistant Professor of Graduate Psychology; Assistant Assessment Specialist James Madison University Center for Assessment & Research Studies Contact Information


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