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Civic Learning and Student Conduct: Judicially Sanctioned Mentoring and Service-Learning Experiences.

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Presentation on theme: "Civic Learning and Student Conduct: Judicially Sanctioned Mentoring and Service-Learning Experiences."— Presentation transcript:

1 Civic Learning and Student Conduct: Judicially Sanctioned Mentoring and Service-Learning Experiences

2 Wendy Young Greg Meyer Tammy Knott Dana Broadnax

3 Outcomes Understand how the Mentor and Site programs work at JMU Assess the applicability of such a program on their own campuses Implement volunteer recruitment and retention strategies Apply some of our sanctioning philosophies to their own processes As a result of attending this program, participants will be able to:

4 JMU Facts and Figures – Harrisonburg, VA – Public Institution – Enrollment: 17,964 – On-campus beds: 6100 (4000 First- Year) – 1150 cases/ 1500 students adjudicated last year (on and off- campus) Process – Single Hearing Officer – Judicial Council – Appeal Sanctions – Substance Education – Civic Education – Other

5 Sanctioning Philosophy Office of Judicial Affairs Mission Statement We are committed to promoting student learning, civic responsibility and, through partnerships, developing the community necessary for the university to achieve its mission

6 Sanctioning Philosophy Guidelines Responsibility vs. Sanctioning Consistency vs. Fairness Substance vs. Civic Education Individual vs. Group Experience Student Needs

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8 History and Evolution: Service-Learning as a Sanction Theories – Dewey: Service-learning – Kohlberg: Moral and Ethical Development – Astin: Involvement – Sanford: Challenge and Support

9 History and Evolution: Service-Learning as a Sanction The Program – Assigned to work a given number of hours at an on-campus site – Attend Weekly Reflection Group Meetings – Write Reflection Paper – Journaling encouraged but not required

10 History and Evolution: Service-Learning as a Sanction Roles – Site supervisor Supervise student work Approve timesheet – Reflection Group Facilitator Guide group in discussion and reflection on learning

11 History and Evolution: Introducing Mentoring John Whitmore: Coaching Experimenting with mentoring as sanction Reflection groups not reaping the intended outcomes in the Service Learning Program.

12 Theories – Lois Zachary: The Mentor Guide – Laurie Beth Jones: Mission Statement Program – Students assigned between 25 – 75 hours of service – Mentors meet for 15 weekly (one-hour) meetings – 9 students were only given a mentor due to lack of enough sites History and Evolution: Madison Master Mentors with Site

13 History and Evolution: Assessment University Sense of Belonging Scale – Students showed higher levels at post test for important items – Students with a mentor showed higher levels at post test for most items – Most significant gains shown for students with ONLY a mentor

14 History and Evolution: Madison Master Mentors with or without Site Theories – Stages of Change Program – Volunteers receive meal vouchers – Students can receive just a mentor (15 hours) or a combination of mentor (8, 10, 12, 15) and site (25 – 75)

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17 History and Evolution: Assessment University Sense of Belonging continued to significantly increase Increase was still highest in the mentoring only students (but not as high as the previous yearmore stable) Finalized goals & objectives for civic learning programs (site & mentor) Assessment information used to acquire funding for full-time position

18 History and Evolution: Assessment Developed Help-Seeking assessment Created rubrics for mentoring & site experience Continued to see increase in University Sense of Belonging but smallerdecided to start to look into a more sensitive measure of belonging Divided programs so site experience would not require a mentor; added Values In Action to civic learning education

19 Civic Learning Today Present

20 Civic Learning Today: Mentor Experience 8, 10, 12, or 15 hours Personal Direction Mission, Values, Goals

21 Civic Learning Today: Site Experience 30, 45, or 60 ON-CAMPUS Involvement Reflection Groups

22 Civic Learning Today: Process Sanctioning Intake Interview Intentional Matching Ongoing Communication Reflection Paper Exit Interview

23 Assessment Current and Future Revised University Mattering Scale Help-Seeking Scale Performance Assessment Qualitative Analysis (Nvivo) Use of comparative groups Civic Responsibility Behavior Questionnaire Further development of Values In Action goals, objectives, & rubrics

24 Civic Learning Today: Growth 2006 – 2007 – 45 intake 2007 – 2008 – 73 intake 2008 – 2009 – 106 intake Fall 2009 – 68 Intake – GA (20 hrs/wk) 35 mentors, 20 sites – Administrator (40 hrs/wk) – GA (20 hrs/wk) 55 mentors, 24 sites – Administrator (40 hrs/wk) – GA (20 hrs/wk) – Student (5 hrs/wk) – Administrator (40 hrs/wk) – GA (20 hrs/wk) – 2 Student (14 hrs/wk) 109 mentors, 28 sites

25 Volunteer Recruitment Start with people you know Network & know your resources Volunteer for other departments/programs Be excellent in what you do & approachable Word of mouth & other advertising Provide feedbackdirect quotes of participants on how program goes

26 Volunteer Training Be flexibletime of year, week, day Balance length with need Clear goals & objectives Assess & implement feedback provided from participants and trainers

27 Mentor Training Overview (2.5 hours) – Student and volunteer quotes – Goals and Objectives – Stages of Change Listening Skills (1.5 hours) Mentor Basics (3 hours) – Mentor Phases – Strategies – Role Plays Mentor Activities (1.5 hours) – Sample activities – Mission and Goals

28 Site Supervisor Training Overview (2.5 hours) – Student and volunteer quotes – Goals and Objectives – Stages of Change Listening Skills (1.5 hours) Supervisor Training (1.5 hours) – Goals and Objectives – Appropriate use of student time

29 Volunteer Retention Retention

30 Volunteer Retention Communication Flexibility Ongoing training Challenges (i.e. ask volunteers to train others) Involve in decision-making about program Provide feedback (i.e. reflection papers) Recognition

31 What About Your Campus? What type of intervention would best serve students who come through your office? Does your office have the resources for a program like this? Does another office on your campus have the resources for a program like this? What theories influence practice in your office?

32 Tips Start small Assessment Theories Dont outgrow your resources Keep student needs as central concern Relationships/Collaboration Word of Mouth

33 Discussion and Questions

34 Visit Us On the Web… Or Contact Us With Questions Greg Meyer – Wendy Young – Tammy Knott – Dana Broadnax –


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