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Acknowledgements Dusan Baljevic These slides have been used in various presentations in Australia over the last four years. This is a work-in-progress.

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Presentation on theme: "Acknowledgements Dusan Baljevic These slides have been used in various presentations in Australia over the last four years. This is a work-in-progress."— Presentation transcript:

1 HP-UX Dynamic Root Disk Boot Disk Cloning Benefits and Use Cases Dusan Baljevic 2013

2 Acknowledgements Dusan Baljevic These slides have been used in various presentations in Australia over the last four years. This is a work-in-progress. I bear full responsibility for any error, even though it is purely unintentional. I cannot claim credits solely, nor can I claim that I know everything about Unix. I consider myself to be a Unix Apprentice. For that reason I need to give special credits to our colleagues Nobuyuki Hirota (TCE&Q BCS ERT), Daniel Bambou (TC&Q BCS ERT), and Leon Strauss (GSE) for their continuous support, advice, comments, and guidance. Wisdom of many helped in creation of the presentation (seminars at HP, HPWorld, ITRC/HPSC forums, HP Ambassadors and Unix Profession forums, HP Education courses, individual contributions on the Net). Last Updated in March 2013

3 What Kind of Use Cases? Dusan Baljevic This presentation is not displaying formulated textual, structural and visual modeling techniques for specifying use cases with the HP-UX DRD. In software and systems engineering, a use case is a list of steps, typically defining interactions between a role (known in UML as an "actor") and a system, to achieve a goal. The actor can be a human or an external system. In systems engineering, use cases are used at a higher level than within software engineering, often representing missions or stakeholder goals. The detailed requirements may then be captured in SysML or as contractual statements. Rather, in our context, use cases are practical examples of HP-UX DRD usage.

4 Bootable System Images in Unix/Linux
Dusan Baljevic Many tools available. For the sake of brevity, to mention a few: AIX mksysb, Network Installation Manager (NIM) HP-UX make_tape_recovery/make_net_recovery, Dynamic Root Disk (DRD)*, VM mirroring Linux Mondo Rescue, Clonezilla Solaris ufsdump, fssnap+ufsdump, flash/JumpStart Tru64 btcreate * DRD is similar to Solaris Live Upgrade and AIX Alternate Root

5 Why Boot Disk Cloning is Critical Today?
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 Creates a "point-in-time“ O/S image, On-line patching and configuration changes of the inactive O/S, Easier change management approvals because the active O/S is not affected (risk is eliminated), Some tasks make dynamic changes of the O/S during the cloning, without affecting the active O/S, Boot disk mirroring does not prevent disasters caused by human error, If boot disks are on the same controller, mirroring is not a perfect protection.

6 Dynamic Root Disk Mission *
Dusan Baljevic Significantly reduce the downtime needed to perform HP-UX software maintenance Reduce the downtime required for recovery from administrative errors * Courtesy of Susan Benzel Perform software update work during normal business hours, or whenever convenient Provision systems quickly and efficiently Simplify testing

7 Dynamic Root Disk Cycles
Provision - [Re-]Ignite - Recover - Clone Software Management - Identify - Acquire Organize Deploy Bare Metal - unused HW Maintain - Monitor - Patches - Applications - Recovery Upgrade or Recycle - update-ux - re-ignite

8 HP-UX Dynamic Root Disk Features 1 of 4
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 Dynamic Root Disk (DRD) provides the ability to clone an HP-UX system image to an inactive disk. Supported on HP PA-RISC and Itanium-based systems. Supported on hard partitions (nPars), virtual partitions (vPars), and Integrity Virtual Machines (Integrity VMs), running the following operating systems with roots managed by the following Volume Managers (except as specifically noted for rehosting):  o HP-UX 11i V2 (11.23) September 2004 or later o HP-UX 11i V3 (11.31) o LVM (all O/S releases supported by DRD) o VxVM 4.1 o VxVM 5.x

9 HP-UX Dynamic Root Disk Features 2 of 4
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 Product : DynRootDisk Version: A (DRD_1131_WEB1301.depot) (DRD_1123_WEB1301.depot) The target disk must be a single physical disk, or SAN LUN. The target disk must be large enough to hold all of the root volume file systems. DRD allows the cloning of the root volume group even if the master O/S is spread across multiple disks (it is a one-way, many-to-one operation). On Itanium servers, all partitions are created; EFI and HP-UX partitions are copied. This release of DRD does not copy the HPSP partition. Copy of lvmtab on the cloned image is modified by the clone operation to contain information that will reflect the desired volume groups when the clone is booted.

10 HP-UX Dynamic Root Disk Features 3 of 4
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 Only the contents of vg00 are copied. Due to system calls DRD depends on, DRD expects legacy Device Special Files (DSFs) to be present and the legacy naming model to be enabled on HP-UX 11i v3 servers. HP recommends only partial migration to persistent DSFs be performed. If the disk is currently in use by another volume group that is visible on the system, the disk will not be used. If the disk contains LVM, VxVM, or boot records but is not in use, one must use the “-x overwrite” option to tell DRD to overwrite the disk. Already-created clones will contain boot records; the drd status command will show the disk that is currently in use as an inactive system image.

11 HP-UX Dynamic Root Disk Features 4 of 4
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 All DRD processes, including “drd clone” and “drd runcmd”, can be safely interrupted issuing Control-C (SIGINT) from the controlling terminal or by issuing kill –HUP <pid> (SIGHUP). This action causes DRD to abort processing. Do not interrupt DRD using the kill -9 <pid> command (SIGKILL), which fails to abort safely and does not perform cleanup. Refer to the “Known Issues” list on the DRD web page (http://www.hp.com/go/DRD) for cleanup instructions after drd runcmd is interrupted. The Ignite server will only be aware of the clone if it is mounted during a make_*_recovery operation. DRD Revision A.3.12 DRD supports SoftReboot feature if a machine is installed with SoftReboot on a supported platform.

12 HP-UX Dynamic Root Disk versus Ignite-UX
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 DRD has several advantages over Ignite-UX net and tape images: * No tape drive is needed, * No impact on network performance will occur, * No security issues of transferring data across the network. Mirror Disk/UX keeps an "always up-to-date" image of the booted system. DRD provides a "point-in-time“ image. The booted system and the clone may then diverge due to changes to either one. Keeping the clone unchanged is the Recovery scenario. DRD is not available for HP-UX 11.11, which limits options on those systems.

13 DRD and update-ux Practices
HP Unix Professions Webcast October 2007 DRD and update-ux Practices

14 HP-UX Patching Versus Update-UX 1 of 2
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 The update-ux method is not only used to update from a lower to a higher version (for example, 11i v2 to v3), but also to update from an older to a newer release within the same version. For many reasons, we encourage usage of update-ux with Dynamic Root Disk (DRD). If O/S is upgraded through update-ux process, the best practice recommends cold installs; incremental upgrades might create possibility that some obsolete software and libraries exist afterwards.

15 HP-UX Patching Versus Update-UX 2 of 2
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 We recommend customers develop a release “cycle” through DRD implementation: Run update-ux every year (18 months or maximum two years is acceptable in some circumstances). Only break this cycle if they must have some new functionality in a bi-annual release. Unless specifically requested differently, the patch/update level should be at latest release, if practicable, or LATEST-1.

16 DRD is Minimizing Downtime
HP Unix Professions Webcast October 2007 DRD is Minimizing Downtime

17 HP-UX DRD: Minimizing Planned Downtime
Dusan Baljevic DRD enables the administrator to create a point-in-time clone of the vg00 volume group: Original vg00 image remains active; Cloned vg00 image remains inactive until needed; Unlike boot disk mirrors, DRD clones are unaffected by vg00 changes. DRD is an optional, free product on the 11i v2 and v3 application media. Install patches on the clone; applications remain running lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 boot disk boot mirror clone disk clone mirror vg00 (active) cloned vg00 (inactive/patched) Activate the clone to make changes take effect lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 boot disk boot mirror clone disk clone mirror vg00 (inactive) cloned vg00 (active/patched) 17

18 DRD Clones Minimize Unplanned Downtime
Dusan Baljevic Without DRD: In case of O/S mis-configuration, it may be necessary to restore from tape. With DRD: In case of O/S mis-configuration, simply activate and boot the clone. Original boot VG is corrupted lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 boot disk boot mirror clone disk clone mirror original vg00 (unusable) cloned vg00 (inactive) lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 Activate the clone! boot disk boot mirror clone disk clone mirror original vg00 (unusable) cloned vg00 (active) 18

19 DRD Clones Minimize Planned Downtime
Dusan Baljevic Without DRD: Software and kernel management may require extended downtime. With DRD: Install/remove software on the clone while applications continue running. Install patches & tune the kernel on the clone; applications remain running lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 boot disk boot mirror clone disk clone mirror vg00 (active) cloned vg00 (inactive/patched) Activate the clone to make changes take effect lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 lvol1 lvol2 lvol3 boot disk boot mirror clone disk clone mirror vg00 (inactive) cloned vg00 (active/patched) 19

20 HP Unix Professions Webcast October 2007
DRD – Pros and Cons

21 HP-UX DRD Pros 1 of 2 Fully supported by HP. Full clone.
Dusan Baljevic Fully supported by HP. Full clone. Complements other HP solutions by reducing system downtime required to install and update patches and software. Copy operation is currently done by fbackup and frecover. kctune command can be used to modify kernel parameters in the clone. The ioconfig file and the entire /dev directory are copied by the DRD clone operation, so instance numbers will not change when the clone is booted.* Supports nPars, vPars, and Integrity VMs.

22 HP-UX DRD Pros 2 of 2 No tape drive is needed.
Dusan Baljevic No tape drive is needed. No impact on network performance. No security issues of transferring data across the network. All DRD processes, including drd clone and drd runcmd, can be safely interrupted issuing Control-C (SIGINT) from the controlling terminal or by issuing kill -HUP<pid> (SIGHUP). This action causes DRD to abort processing and perform any necessary clean up. Do not interrupt DRD using the kill -9 <pid> command (SIGKILL), which fails to abort safely and does not perform cleanup.

23 HP-UX DRD Cons 1 of 4 Dusan Baljevic Target disk must be a single disk or mirror group only. Not easy to list all differences between Active and Inactive image (drd sync * is the simplistic option). Cloning should be done when the server’s activity is at a minimum. DRD can clone root volume group that is spread across multiple disks. The target must be a single disk or mirrored pair. * To verify differences: # diff /etc/passwd /var/opt/drd/mnts/sysimage_001/etc/passwd For example, in Solaris, the whole comparison is automated: # lustatus Boot Environment Is Active Active Can Copy Name Complete Now On Reboot Delete Status d yes yes yes no - BE no no no no ACTIVE # lufslist BE1 # lufslist BE2 # lucompare BE2

24 HP-UX DRD Cons 2 of 4 Dusan Baljevic Contents of root volume group are copied. A system that has /opt (or any file system that is patched) not in root volume group is not suitable for use with DRD. Does not provide a mechanism for resizing file systems during a DRD clone operation. However, after the clone is created, you can manually change file system sizes on the inactive system without needing an immediate reboot. The whitepaper, Using the Dynamic Root Disk Toolset describes resizing file systems other than /stand. The whitepaper Using the DRD toolset to extend the /stand file system in an LVM environment describes resizing the boot (/stand) file system on an inactive system image. Current release of DRD does not copy the Itanium Service Partition (s3 or _p3).

25 HP-UX DRD Cons 3 of 4 Dusan Baljevic Command /opt/drd/lbin/drd_scan_hw_host hangs occasionally. This is a hardware issue as it is trying to scan all connected hardware. Check it before using DRD and maybe even remove stale devices with rmsf –x if necessary: # ioscan -s # lssf -s Too many tiny files on root disks can cause significant performance problem when DRD is used. When there are large number of files in the root VG (for example, two millions), drd clone / drd sync might fail with error "Out of memory". It is suggested to increase maxdsiz kernel parameter, or use "-x exclude_list" option, or remove unnecessary user files.

26 HP-UX DRD Cons 4 of 4 Dusan Baljevic We might see the following error message during the execution of drd runcmd if the nsswitch.conf file contains the "hosts: nis" entry: Error: Could not contact host "myserver". Make sure the hostname is correct and an absolute pathname is specified (beginning with "/"). We might see the following error message during the execution of drd runcmd if the nsswitch.conf file contains the "passwd: compat" or "group: compat" entries: Error: Permission is denied for the current operation. There is no entry for user id 0 in the user database. Check /etc/passwd and/or the NIS user database.

27 Supported Versions of DRD
Dusan Baljevic Versions of DRD are supported for at least two years. Versions not listed in the "Supported DRD Releases" section of the latest Release Notes are no longer supported. We always recommend to have the latest DRD installed.

28 DRD – Installation and Commands
HP Unix Professions Webcast October 2007 DRD – Installation and Commands

29 Installing DRD Dusan Baljevic DRD is included in current 11i v2 and v3 operating environments or ... Download and install DRD from Install DRD with swinstall (no reboot required) # swinstall –s /tmp/DynRootDisk*.depot DynRootDisk 29

30 DRD Commands Dusan Baljevic Most DRD tasks require a single command, drd, which supports multiple “modes”. Example # drd clone –t /dev/disk/diskY –x overwrite=true Other available modes # drd view available modes and options # drd clone ... create a DRD clone # drd mount ... mount the DRD clone’s file systems # drd umount ... unmount the DRD clone’s file systems # drd runcmd ... execute a command on the clone’s file systems # drd activate ... make the DRD clone the default boot disk after next reboot # drd deactivate retain the current active image as the default boot disk # drd status display information about active/inactive DRD images DRD offers several common options that are supported in all modes # drd mode -? view available options # drd mode –x ? view available extended options # drd mode [-x verbosity=3] ... specify stdout/stderr verbosity, 0-5 # drd mode [-x log_verbosity=4] ... specify log file verbosity, 0-5 # drd mode [-qqq|qq|q|v|vv|vvv] ... alternative to –x verbosity=n # drd mode [–p] preview but don’t execute the operation 30

31 DRD – Some Restrictions
HP Unix Professions Webcast October 2007 DRD – Some Restrictions

32 HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008
HP-UX DRD Restrictions on update-ux and sw* Commands Invoked by drd runcmd Options on the Software Distributor commands that can be used with drd runcmd need to ensure that operations are DRD-safe: The -F and -x fix=true options are not supported for drd runcmd swverify operations. Use of these options could result in changes to the booted system. The use of double quotation marks and wild card symbols (*, ?) in the command line must be escaped with a backslash character (\), as in the following example: # drd runcmd swinstall –s depot_server:/var/opt/patches \*  Files referenced in the command line must both: o Reside in the inactive system image o Be referenced in the DRD-safe command by the path relative to the mount point of the inactive system image  This applies to files referenced as arguments for the -C, -f, -S, -X, and -x logfile options for an sw command run by drd runcmd and update-ux command -f option.

33 HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008
HP-UX Issue when DRD versions different in booted and cloned environment 1 of 2 # drd runcmd swinstall -s /tmp/ignite/Ignite-UX-11-ALL_C depot ======= 11/28/12 00:42:22 IST BEGIN Executing Command On /opt/drd/wrappers/start_fsdaemon[22]: start_fsdaemon: not found. * Stopping swagentd for drd runcmd /opt/drd/wrappers/stop_fsdaemon[22]: stop_fsdaemon: not found. ERROR: Command executed on inactive system image returned an error - One or more postcommands for /usr/sbin/swinstall failed. - One or more precommands for /usr/sbin/swinstall failed. /usr/sbin/swinstall will not be executed. - The precommand "/opt/drd/wrappers/start_fsdaemon" fails with the return code "1". - The postcommand "/opt/drd/wrappers/stop_fsdaemon" fails with the return code "1". Executing Command On Inactive System Image failed with 1 error.* Cleaning Up After Command Execution On Inactive System Image

34 HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008
HP-UX Issue when DRD versions different in booted and cloned environment 2 of 2 This problem is triggered by having one version of DRD installed on the booted system, and a previous release on the inactive image.  If the clone is not very new, just re-run drd clone.  If you do not want to re-create the clone, the following workaround will help: # drd mount # cp /var/opt/drd/mnts/sysimage_001/opt/drd/wrappers/common_utils /var/opt/drd/mnts/sysimage_001/opt/drd/wrappers/common_utils.orig  # cp /opt/drd/wrappers/common_utils /var/opt/drd/mnts/sysimage_001/opt/drd/wrappers/common_utils (If you are booted on the clone, replace "sysimage_001" with "sysimage_000".) The steps above will enable drd runcmd to succeed. However, the file change would cause a swverify error on the version of DRD in the clone. To repair this, install the new version of DRD to the inactive image:  # drd runcmd swinstall -s <depot> DynRootDisk

35 HP-UX DRD Updates from multiple-DVD media
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 HP-UX DRD Updates from multiple-DVD media DRD updates directly from media require the September 2010 OE (or later) versions of DRD, SWM and SW-DIST products. In order to use a media depot to do a DRD update, first install September 2010 or later versions of DRD, SWM, and SW-DIST products from the media. This must be done before the clone is created, so the new DRD, SWM, and SW-DIST are on the active system and on the clone.

36 HP Unix Professions Webcast October 2007
DRD – Usage Scenarios

37 Creating and Updating DRD Clone
[Course Title] [Module Title] Creating and Updating DRD Clone Use the drd clone command to create a DRD clone of the active boot disk: DRD identifies the current active boot disk DRD builds a similarly structured clone disk DRD copies the current disk’s file system contents to the clone DRD builds a mirror of the clone, too, if requested DRD records log messages in /var/opt/drd/drd.log Identify available disk(s) # ioscan –funC disk list all disks on the system # lvmadm –l or strings /etc/lvmtab* which disks are LVM disks? # vxdisk list which disks are VxVM disks? # diskinfo /dev/rdisk/disk verify the disk size Clone the current active boot disk # drd clone –t /dev/disk/disk3 \ specify a target disk (required!) [–x overwrite=true] \ overwrite data on target [-x mirror_disk=/dev/disk/disk4] create a mirror of the DRD Update an existing clone (overwrite=true required!) # drd clone –t /dev/disk/disk3 \ specify a target disk (required!) –x overwrite=true \ overwrite data on target [-x mirror_disk=/dev/disk/disk4] create a mirror of the DRD 37 [Rev. # or date] – HP Restricted

38 Verifying DRD Clone Status
[Course Title] [Module Title] Verifying DRD Clone Status # drd status ======= 07/23/08 12:13:57 EDT BEGIN Displaying DRD Clone Image Information (user=root) (jobid=myhost) * Clone Disk: /dev/disk/disk3 * Clone EFI Partition: Boot loader and AUTO file present * Clone Creation Date: /18/08 21:07:29 EDT * Clone Mirror Disk: None * Mirror EFI Partition: None * Original Disk: /dev/disk/disk1 * Original EFI Partition: Boot loader and AUTO file present * Booted Disk: Original Disk (/dev/disk/disk1) * Activated Disk: Original Disk (/dev/disk/disk1) ======= 07/23/08 12:14:04 EDT END Displaying DRD Clone Image Information succeeded. (user=root) (jobid=myhost) If you run drd activate and then decide not to activate the inactive system image, you have the following options for undoing activation of the inactive system image: Look through /var/opt/drd/drd.log to find messages indicating the previous primary boot path, the run setboot –p to set the primary boot path to that disk. Run vgdisplay –v to determine the disk containing vg00, then run ioscan –fnkC disk to determine the hardware path corresponding to the disk, then run setboot –p to set the primary boot path to that disk. Run cat /stand/bootconf to get the device file of the boot disk, run ioscn –fnkC disk to identify the corresponding hardware path, and then run setboot –p to set the primary boot path. 38 [Rev. # or date] – HP Restricted

39 [Course Title] [Module Title] DRD-Safe Commands Files in the inactive system image are not accessible, by default, to HP-UX commands. “DRD-Safe” commands can be executed on the inactive image via drd runcmd Temporarily imports and mounts the inactive image’s volume group and file systems, Executes the specified command using executables & files on the inactive image, Ensures that the active image remains untouched, Unmounts and exports the inactive image’s file systems and volume group. DRD-safe commands currently include: swinstall swremove swlist swmodify swverify swjob kctune update-ux view [Rev. # or date] – HP Restricted

40 Managing Patches with DRD-Safe Commands
[Course Title] [Module Title] Managing Patches with DRD-Safe Commands Installing patches and software sometimes requires a reboot and downtime. Minimize downtime by installing software/patches/updates on an inactive image. Changes take effect when you activate and boot the inactive image. Only DRD-Safe patches/products can be installed via DRD. List software installed on the inactive image using the DRD-Safe swlist command # drd runcmd swlist Check if product or patch is DRD-Safe # swlist –l fileset –a is_drd_safe product_name|patch Install software on the inactive image using the DRD-Safe swinstall command # drd runcmd swinstall –s server:/mydepot PHSS_NNNNN Remove software from the inactive image using the DRD-Safe swremove command # drd runcmd swremove PHSS_NNNNN View the inactive image SDUX log file using the DRD-Safe view command # drd runcmd view /var/adm/sw/swagent.log Update to a more recent 11i v3 media kit # drd runcmd swinstall –s server:/mydepot Update-UX # drd runcmd update-ux –s server:/mydepot # drd runcmd view /var/adm/sw/update-ux.log # drd runcmd view /var/opt/swm/sw.log 40 [Rev. # or date] – HP Restricted

41 Accessing DRD Inactive Images
[Course Title] [Module Title] Accessing DRD Inactive Images The drd runcmd utility only executes DRD-safe executables on an inactive image. To access other files on the inactive image, mount the image via drd mount Imports the inactive image volume group, typically as drd00, Mounts the image file systems under /var/opt/drd/mnts/sysimage_001 Warnings: Be careful not to unintentionally modify the active system image! Only use read-only commands like view and diff to access inactive images. Mount the inactive image file systems # drd mount # mount -v Access the inactive image file systems, being careful not to modify the active image! # diff /etc/passwd /var/opt/drd/mnts/sysimage_001/etc/passwd Unmount the inactive image file systems # drd umount 41 [Rev. # or date] – HP Restricted

42 Activating and Deactivating Inactive DRD Image
[Course Title] [Module Title] Activating and Deactivating Inactive DRD Image Use drd activate to make the inactive image the primary boot disk DRD updates the boot menu DRD can optionally reboot the system immediately Promote the inactive system image to become primary boot disk (with preview) # drd activate [-x reboot=false] -p Check the bootpath # setboot -v If –x reboot=true wasn’t specified, manually reboot # shutdown –ry 0 If you change your mind before rebooting, use drd deactivate to undo the activation # drd deactivate Use drd status to determine which disk is the currently active boot disk # drd status 42 [Rev. # or date] – HP Restricted

43 DRD Inactive Image Synchronization
[Course Title] [Module Title] DRD Inactive Image Synchronization The drd sync command was introduced in release B.11.xx.A.3.5 of Dynamic Root Disk (DRD) to propagate root volume group file system changes from the booted original system to the inactive clone image. Running drd sync command updates/creates the files on Inactive Image (Clone Disk) which were modified on Active Image (Boot Disk) after last successful execution of drd clone command. pax archive is used for drd sync while fbackup/frestore is used for clone. To preview differences between the Active Image and the DRD Inactive Image # drd sync –p It creates file /var/opt/drd/sync/files_to_be_copied_by_drd_sync Once the preview is checked, a resync of the cloned image can be initiated # drd sync 43 [Rev. # or date] – HP Restricted

44 drd sync Without DRD Sync With DRD Sync
A system administrator creates a DRD clone on a Thursday. The administrator applies a collection of software changes to the clone on Friday using the drd runcmd command. On Friday, several log files are updated on the booted system. On Saturday, the clone is booted, however the log files are not up to date, so the administrator must copy over the log files and any other files from the original system that changed after the clone was created – for example, /etc/passwd With DRD Sync A system administrator creates a DRD clone on a Thursday. The administrator applies a collection of software changes to the clone on Friday using the drd runcmd command. On Friday, several log files are updated on the booted system. On Saturday, the clone is synced then booted – log files and other files that have changed on the original system have automatically been copied to the clone.

45 Files that have changed on the clone are not synchronized
drd sync The list of files on the active system whose modification date is newer than or equal to the clone creation time provides the initial list of files to be synchronized 1. Locations that are not synchronized /var/adm/sw: Because the appropriate mechanism for managing software changes on the clone is drd runcmd, the directory tree rooted at /var/adm/sw (which contains the Software Distributor Installed Products Database and associated log files) is not copied by drd sync. Instead, files in this location are created and modified by execution of Software Distributor commands (such as swinstall and swremove) during execution of the drd runcmd command. /tmp, /var/tmp, /var/opt/drd/tmp: These locations contain transient files, so changes to files in these locations are not propagated to the clone. /stand: Changes to the HP-UX kernel should be applied by using drd runcmd with either a Software Distributor command or the /usr/sbin/kctune command, so changes in this location are not propagated by drd sync. /dev/<clone_group>: To prevent errors in the drd mount command, the /dev/<clone_group> directory is not copied to the clone. The collection of files that are not synchronized—because they reside in locations that are not synchronized—is written to the /var/opt/drd/sync/filtered_out_by_non_synced_location_filter file, which is refreshed each time drd sync is run, even if the command is run with the -p preview option. 2. Files that have changed on the clone A file residing on the clone might have been changed by a drd runcmd operation, and it may have been updated on the booted system as well. This can occur even if the file is not listed in the Software Distributor Installed Products Database (that is, in the output of swlist –l file). For example, the installation of a product can add a new user to /etc/passwd. In the case that a file has been updated on both the booted system and the clone, drd sync does not copy the file. This avoids overwriting any changes made by installation (or removal) of software on the clone. Because administrators might be interested in identifying changed files on the clone that will not be synchronized, the list of such files is written to the /var/opt/drd/filtered_out_by_target_changed_filter file, even if the drd sync command is run with the -p preview option. For any file listed in /var/opt/drd/filtered_out_by_target_changed_filter, the administrator can use a command such as diff to compare the versions of the file on the booted disk and the clone. If the administrator determines that the file should be copied to the clone, the copy on the clone can be erased and the drd sync command executed again. 3. Nonvolatile files in the Software Distributor Installed Products Database (IPD) Most files delivered in software packages should not be changed by a system administrator. To emphasize this fact, the files have the attribute is_volatile set to false. Any change to such a file results in an error if the swverify command is run (on the booted system if the file is changed there, or through drd runcmd if the file is changed on the clone.) To keep files delivered by Software Distributor in accordance with the information recorded about them in the Software Distributor Installed Products Database (IPD), changes to nonvolatile files in the IPD are not propagated by drd sync. (Note that nonvolatile files are those displayed as output from the command /usr/sbin/swlist -l file –a is_volatile | grep false). The list of “new” files on the booted system that are nonvolatile files in the Installed Products Database is written to /var/opt/drd/filtered_out_by_nonvolatile_filter, even if the drd sync command is run with the -p preview option. 4. Volatile files in the Software Distributor Installed Products Database. (IPD) Files delivered by Software Distributor with the file attribute is_volatile set to true may be changed by the system administrator. In fact, in many cases, they must be changed by the system administrator. For example, the /etc/rc.config.d/netconf file must be customized for each system to include its network configuration. Typically, such a customization applies to both the booted system and the clone image. Thus, such changes are ordinarily propagated to the clone by the drd sync command. However, if the clone has been updated to a new release of the operating system (or a release of a particular software package that changes the format of the file), propagation of the changes may be inappropriate. DRD uses the configuration template (delivered to a location containing a directory named newconfig) for the volatile file to determine if the changes should be propagated to the clone. If the templates are the same, the change is propagated, otherwise, they are not. Nonvolatile files that have a modification time newer than or equal to the clone creation time on the booted system, but cannot be copied to the clone due to differing templates, are listed in the /var/opt/drd/filtered_out_by_volatile_filter file, even if the drd sync command is run with the -p preview option. After criteria 1 through 4 (above) are applied, the list of files to be copied to the inactive clone during a drd sync operation is written to /var/opt/drd/files_to_be_copied_by_drd_sync, even if the drd sync command is run with the -p preview option. Trimming the list of files to be synchronized The following locations are not synchronized: /var/adm/sw, /tmp, /var/tmp, /var/opt/drd/tmp, /stand, /dev/<clone_group>, Files that have changed on the clone are not synchronized Nonvolatile files in the Software Distributor Installed Products Database (IPD) are not synchronized Volatile files in the Software Distributor Installed Products Database (IPD) are not synchronized

46 HP-UX DRD Examples for Different O/S Releases
Dusan Baljevic HP-UX 11iv2: # drd clone -t /dev/dsk/c2t1d0 -x \ overwrite=true [-x mirror_disk=/dev/dsk/c3t0d1] HP-UX 11iv3, use agile views: # drd clone -t /dev/disk/disk32 -x \ overwrite=true [-x mirror_disk=/dev/disk/disk4] Note that all partitions on Itanium disk are created, and s1 and s2 (_p1 and _p2) are copied.

47 HP-UX 11i v2 To v3 Upgrade with DRD 1 of 3
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 Original image: /dev/dsk/c0t0d0 (HP-UX 11i v2) Clone disk: /dev/dsk/c1t0d0 What to apply: HP-UX 11i v3 Update 9, Virtual Server OE Depot with patches depsvr:/var/depots/1131_VSE-OE Version of DRD: B A.3.3 or later Objective: Utilize DRD to help adjust file systems sizes when performing an HP-UX 11i v2 to v3 update Create the clone: # drd clone –t /dev/dsk/c1t0d0 Use drd status to view the clone: # drd status

48 HP-UX 11i v2 To v3 Upgrade with DRD 2 of 3
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 Run update-UX in preview mode on the active disk: # update-ux -p -s depsvr:/var/depots/1131 HPUX11i-VSE-OE Adjust file system sizes on the clone as needed Activate and boot the clone, setting the alternate bootpath to the HP-UX 11i v2 disk: # drd activate -x alternate_bootdisk=/dev/dsk/c0t0d0 -x reboot=true Update the active image to HP-UX 11i v3, Virtual Server OE: # update-ux -s depsvr:/var/depots/1131_VSE-OE HPUX11i-VSE-OE There will be a reboot executed at this time.

49 HP-UX 11i v2 To v3 Upgrade with DRD 3 of 3
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 Ensure that the software is installed properly: # swverify \* Verify all software has been updated to the HP-UX 11i v3: # swlist Ensure the integrity of your updated system by checking the following log files /var/adm/sw/update-ux.log and /var/opt/swm/swm.log

50 HP-UX How to Interrupt DRD processes
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 All DRD processes, including “drd clone” and “drd runcmd”, can be safely interrupted issuing Control-C (SIGINT) from the controlling terminal or by issuing kill –HUP <pid> (SIGHUP). This action causes DRD to abort processing. Do not interrupt DRD using the kill -9 <pid> command (SIGKILL), which fails to abort safely and does not perform cleanup. Refer to the “Known Issues” list on the DRD web page (http://www.hp.com/go/DRD) for cleanup instructions after drd runcmd is interrupted.

51 HP-UX DRD Examples How to Select Software
Dusan Baljevic To exclude single product T1458AA # drd runcmd update-ux -p –s \ svr:/var/opt/HPUX_1131_0903_DCOE HPUX11i-DC-OE \ !T1458AA Use -f software_file * to read the list of sw_selections from software_file instead of (or in addition to) the command line # drd runcmd update-ux -s source_location \ -f software_file * For deselecting software/products, sw_selection, the file should contain !sw_selection , like for example:    !selection or [bundle]/[%match] or pattern-matching-expression

52 HP-UX DRD Rehost Cookbook 1 of 2
Dusan Baljevic Clone the host1 system to a shared LUN # drd clone -t /dev/disk/diskX Create a system information file for host2 # vi /tmp/sysinfo_host2 SYSINFO_HOSTNAME=host2 SYSINFO_DHCP_ENABLE[0]=0 SYSINFO_MAC_ADDRESS[0]=0x1edb3adea7ab SYSINFO_IP_ADDRESS[0]= SYSINFO_SUBNET_MASK[0]= SYSINFO_ROUTE_GATEWAY[0]= SYSINFO_ROUTE_DESTINATION[0]=default SYSINFO_ROUTE_COUNT[0]=1

53 HP-UX DRD Rehost Cookbook 2 of 2
Dusan Baljevic Execute the drd rehost command, specifying the system information file created in the previous step. # drd rehost -f /tmp/sysinfo_host2 Unpresent the LUN from the host1, and present it to the host2. Choose the new LUN from the boot screens and boot the host2. On both hosts reinitialize the DRD configuration by deleting the registry # rm -f /var/opt/drd/registry/registry.xml Remove the Device Special File of the boot device of the host2 # rmsf -H 64000/0xfa00/0x6

54 HP-UX Expand Root File System with DRD 1 of 3
Dusan Baljevic For this example, we assume vg00 has only one disk (disk0) in LVM L1 and the DRD will hold on disk5. Note, however, that support procedure for extending the root filesystem is using Ignite-UX! Create a clone of the root filesystem  # drd clone -v -x overwrite=true -t /dev/disk/disk5 Mount the DRD filesystem as vgdrd # mkdir /dev/vgdrd # mknod /dev/vgdrd/group c 64 0x0a0000 # vgimport /dev/vgdrd /dev/disk/disk5 # vgchange -a y vgdrd NOTE: The minor number must be unique on the server.

55 HP-UX Expand Root File System with DRD 2 of 3
Dusan Baljevic Create a new lvol to hold lvol4 # lvcreate -l <lvol4_size> -n lvtmp /dev/vgdrd Copy the data from lvol4 to lvtmp # dd if=/dev/vgdrd/lvol4 of=/dev/vgdrd/lvtmp bs=1024 Remove lvol4 # lvremove /dev/vgdrd/lvol4 Assume that there is a need to get to 450 PE on root # lvextend -l 450 /dev/vgdrd/lvol3 Recreate lvol4 and move the data back: # lvcreate -l <lvol4_size> -n lvol4 /dev/vgdrd # dd if=/dev/vgdrd/lvtmp of=/dev/vgdrd/lvol4 bs=1024

56 HP-UX Expand Root File System with DRD 3 of 3
Dusan Baljevic Check the size change # vgdisplay -v vgdrd Remove the DRD volume group # vgexport vgdrd Boot from the DRD volume # /opt/drd/bin/drd activate -x reboot=true

57 HP-UX DRD Update-ux with Single Reboot
Dusan Baljevic Create a clone disk: # drd clone -x overwrite=true -t <block_DSF_target_disk> Install OE update-ux on the clone: # drd runcmd update-ux -v -s /hp/raj.depot/ HPUX11i-VSE-OE \ !Ignite-UX !Ignite-UX !T1335DC !IGNITE \ !Ignite-UX-11-11 Install required patches from a depot. Install Patches, HP Products, non-HP Products from single depot: # drd runcmd swinstall -x patch_match_target=true -x \ -s /hp/non-oe.depot \* Boot the clone when ready # drd activate -x \ alternate_bootdisk=<block_DSF_current_ boot_disk> \ -x reboot=true

58 HP-UX DRD Debug Session *
Dusan Baljevic Clean /var/opt/drd directory # cd /var/opt/drd # rm -rf tmp/* mapfiles/* drd.log inventory \ mnts registry sync Run DRD session with following environment set and duplicate the issue # export INST_DEBUG=5 # export SMDDEBUG_SMDINIT=9 # drd … -x overwrite=true -x verbosity=D \ -x log_verbosity=D Collect the archive of /var/opt/drd # cd /var/opt # tar cvf /var/tmp/drd.tar drd # gzip /var/tmp/drd.tar Make sure to collect the debug log when the problem can be duplicated and obtain the archive of /var/opt/drd when opening an L3 case * Courtesy of WTEC

59 HP-UX DRD Serial Patch Installation
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 # swlist –l fileset –a is_drd_safe \ <product_name|patch> # swcopy -s /tmp/PHCO_38159.depot /var/opt/mx/depot11/PHCO_38159.dir # drd runcmd swinstall -s \ /var/opt/mx/depot11/PHCO_38159.dir PHCO_38159

60 HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008
HP-UX DRD with SWA 1 of 3 HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 Use drd status to view the clone: # drd status Determine what patches are needed: a. Mount the clone: # drd mount b. Create an SWA report: # swa report -s /var/opt/drd/mnts/sysimage001

61 HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008
HP-UX DRD with SWA 2 of 3 HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 Download the patches identified by SWA into a depot: # swa get -t /var/depots/myswa Patch installation might require special attention. Review any special installation instructions documented in /var/depots/myswa/readBeforeInstall.txt.

62 HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008
HP-UX DRD with SWA 3 of 3 HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 Install everything in the 1131swa depot: # drd runcmd swinstall \ -s /var/depots/1131swa -x patch_match_target=true Ensure the patches are installed: # drd runcmd view /var/adm/sw/swagent.log Unmount the clone: # drd umount Activate and boot the clone: # drd activate -x reboot=true

63 HP-UX 11i V2 to V3 Upgrade via DRD
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 DRD can be used to update from 11iv2 to 11iv3. Whether that is the best option is another question. Note that there is a difference between solutions working and vendors supporting them. There are many examples in IT field when vendors refuse to “certify” solutions although they are known to work reasonably well. There were some issues with clone activations in certain releases of DRD though. I have done this upgrade via DRD many times. You must ensure that the newer version (11i v3) DVDs (or ISO images) are not from a revision date earlier than what the 11i v2 was created with. The best practice recommends cold installs as incremental upgrades might leave possibility that some obsolete software and libraries exist afterwards. I enclose herewith another HP document that confirms it (I am sure there are many other documents around). Or, a customer’s experience:

64 HP-UX Using DRD to Change Volume Manager
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 Create clone via DRD Boot the clone Migrate the LVM disk to VxVM using vxcp_lvmroot command: # /etc/vx/bin/vxcp_lvmroot -v disk1

65 HP-UX DRD Multiple Copies of Targets 1 of 11 *
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 # ioscan -funNC disk Class I H/W Path Driver S/W State H/W Type Description =================================================================== disk /0xfa00/0x0 esdisk CLAIMED DEVICE HP 73.4GMAU3073NC /dev/disk/disk5 /dev/rdisk/disk5 disk /0xfa00/0x1 esdisk CLAIMED DEVICE HP 146 GST LC /dev/disk/disk6 /dev/rdisk/disk6 disk /0xfa00/0x2 esdisk CLAIMED DEVICE HP 73.4GMAU3073NC /dev/disk/disk /dev/rdisk/disk7 /dev/disk/disk7_p1 /dev/rdisk/disk7_p1 /dev/disk/disk7_p2 /dev/rdisk/disk7_p2 /dev/disk/disk7_p3 /dev/rdisk/disk7_p3 disk /0xfa00/0x3 esdisk CLAIMED DEVICE TEAC DV-28E-N /dev/disk/disk8 /dev/rdisk/disk8 disk /0xfa00/0x6 esdisk CLAIMED DEVICE HP MSA VOLUME /dev/disk/disk9 /dev/rdisk/disk9 Scenario with three disks: disk 7 (current boot disk) disk 5 disk6 Initial clone is disk 5. Then, we create another clone on disk6. The question is: can we use disk 5?

66 HP-UX DRD Multiple Copies of Targets 2 of 11
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 # drd clone -t /dev/disk/disk5 ======= 03/04/13 11:04:31 EDT BEGIN Clone System Image (user=root) (jobid=ia643)  * Reading Current System Information * Selecting System Image To Clone * Selecting Target Disk * Selecting Volume Manager For New System Image * Analyzing For System Image Cloning * Creating New File Systems * Copying File Systems To New System Image WARNING: The following files could not be copied to the clone. WARNING: This may be caused by updating files during the copy. WARNING: Uncopied file: /var/opt/hpvm/common/command.log * Copying File Systems To New System Image succeeded with 3 warnings. * Making New System Image Bootable * Unmounting New System Image Clone  ======= 03/04/13 11:44:49 EDT END Clone System Image succeeded with 3 warnings. (user=root) (jobid=ia643)

67 HP-UX DRD Multiple Copies of Targets 3 of 11
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 # drd status  ======= 03/04/13 11:45:09 EDT BEGIN Displaying DRD Clone Image Information (user=root) (jobid=ia643) * Clone Disk: /dev/disk/disk5 * Clone EFI Partition: AUTO file present, Boot loader present * Clone Rehost Status: SYSINFO.TXT not present * Clone Creation Date: /04/13 11:04:52 EDT * Last Sync Date: None * Clone Mirror Disk: None * Mirror EFI Partition: None * Original Disk: /dev/disk/disk7 * Original EFI Partition: AUTO file present, Boot loader present * Original Rehost Status: SYSINFO.TXT not present * Booted Disk: Original Disk (/dev/disk/disk7) * Activated Disk: Original Disk (/dev/disk/disk7)  ======= 03/04/13 11:45:28 EDT END Displaying DRD Clone Image Information succeeded. (user=root) (jobid=ia643)

68 HP-UX DRD Multiple Copies of Targets 4 of 11
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 # drd clone -t /dev/disk/disk6 ======= 03/04/13 11:46:17 EDT BEGIN Clone System Image (user=root) (jobid=ia643) * Reading Current System Information * Selecting System Image To Clone * Selecting Target Disk * Selecting Volume Manager For New System Image * Analyzing For System Image Cloning * Creating New File Systems * Copying File Systems To New System Image WARNING: The following files could not be copied to the clone. WARNING: This may be caused by updating files during the copy. WARNING: Uncopied file: /var/opt/hpvm/common/command.log WARNING: Uncopied file: /var/opt/perf/datafiles/logdev * Copying File Systems To New System Image succeeded with 4 warnings. * Making New System Image Bootable * Unmounting New System Image Clone  ======= 03/04/13 12:34:52 EDT END Clone System Image succeeded with 4 warnings. (user=root) (jobid=ia643)

69 HP-UX DRD Multiple Copies of Targets 5 of 11
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 # drd status ======= 03/04/13 12:35:37 EDT BEGIN Displaying DRD Clone Image Information (user=root) (jobid=ia643)  * Clone Disk: /dev/disk/disk6 * Clone EFI Partition: AUTO file present, Boot loader present * Clone Rehost Status: SYSINFO.TXT not present * Clone Creation Date: /04/13 11:46:37 EDT * Last Sync Date: None * Clone Mirror Disk: None * Mirror EFI Partition: None * Original Disk: /dev/disk/disk7 * Original EFI Partition: AUTO file present, Boot loader present * Original Rehost Status: SYSINFO.TXT not present * Booted Disk: Original Disk (/dev/disk/disk7) * Activated Disk: Original Disk (/dev/disk/disk7) ======= 03/04/13 12:35:56 EDT END Displaying DRD Clone Image Information succeeded. (user=root) (jobid=ia643)

70 HP-UX DRD Multiple Copies of Targets 6 of 11
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 # ioscan -m dsf Persistent DSF Legacy DSF(s) ======================================== /dev/pt/pt /dev/rscsi/c5t0d0 /dev/rscsi/c4t0d0 /dev/pt/pt /dev/rscsi/c6t0d0 /dev/rdisk/disk /dev/rdsk/c2t1d0 /dev/rdisk/disk5_p /dev/rdsk/c2t1d0s1 /dev/rdisk/disk5_p /dev/rdsk/c2t1d0s3 /dev/rdisk/disk5_p /dev/rdsk/c2t1d0s2 /dev/rdisk/disk /dev/rdsk/c2t0d0 /dev/rdisk/disk6_p /dev/rdsk/c2t0d0s1 /dev/rdisk/disk6_p /dev/rdsk/c2t0d0s2 /dev/rdisk/disk6_p /dev/rdsk/c2t0d0s3 /dev/rdisk/disk /dev/rdsk/c3t2d0 /dev/rdisk/disk7_p /dev/rdsk/c3t2d0s1 /dev/rdisk/disk7_p /dev/rdsk/c3t2d0s2 /dev/rdisk/disk7_p /dev/rdsk/c3t2d0s3 /dev/rdisk/disk /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0 /dev/rdisk/disk /dev/rdsk/c7t0d2

71 HP-UX DRD Multiple Copies of Targets 7 of 11
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 # ioscan -funneC disk Class I H/W Path Driver S/W State H/W Type Description ======================================================================= disk /0/2/ sdisk CLAIMED DEVICE TEAC DV-28E-N /dev/dsk/c0t0d0 /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0 Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(2|0)/Ata(Primary,Master) disk /1/1/ sdisk CLAIMED DEVICE HP 146 GST LC /dev/dsk/c2t0d0 /dev/rdsk/c2t0d0 /dev/dsk/c2t0d0s1 /dev/rdsk/c2t0d0s1 /dev/dsk/c2t0d0s2 /dev/rdsk/c2t0d0s2 /dev/dsk/c2t0d0s3 /dev/rdsk/c2t0d0s3 Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)/Scsi(Pun0,Lun0)/HD(Part1,SigFB4D90C E D6217B60E588)/\EFI\HPUX\HPUX.EFI disk /1/1/ sdisk CLAIMED DEVICE HP 73.4GMAU3073NC /dev/dsk/c2t1d0 /dev/rdsk/c2t1d0 /dev/dsk/c2t1d0s1 /dev/rdsk/c2t1d0s1 /dev/dsk/c2t1d0s2 /dev/rdsk/c2t1d0s2 /dev/dsk/c2t1d0s3 /dev/rdsk/c2t1d0s3 Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)/Scsi(Pun1,Lun0)/HD(Part1,Sig25DEF F-11E D6217B60E588)/\EFI\HPUX\HPUX.EFI disk /1/1/ sdisk CLAIMED DEVICE HP 73.4GMAU3073NC /dev/dsk/c3t2d0 /dev/rdsk/c3t2d0 /dev/dsk/c3t2d0s1 /dev/rdsk/c3t2d0s1 /dev/dsk/c3t2d0s2 /dev/rdsk/c3t2d0s2 /dev/dsk/c3t2d0s3 /dev/rdsk/c3t2d0s3 Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|1)/Scsi(Pun2,Lun0)/HD(Part1,SigB9B8E4CC-0CE1-11E D6217B60E588)/\EFI\HPUX\HPUX.EFI disk /4/1/ sdisk CLAIMED DEVICE HP MSA VOLUME /dev/dsk/c7t0d2 /dev/rdsk/c7t0d2 Acpi(HWP0002,400)/Pci(1|1)/Fibre(WWN500805F ,Lun

72 HP-UX DRD Multiple Copies of Targets 8 of 11
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 EFI Shell version 1.10 [14.62] Device mapping table fs0 : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)/Scsi(Pun0,Lun0)/HD(Part1,SigFB4D90C E D6217B60E588) fs1 : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)/Scsi(Pun0,Lun0)/HD(Part3,SigFB4D90EA E D6217B60E588) fs2 : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)/Scsi(Pun1,Lun0)/HD(Part1,Sig25DEF F-11E D6217B60E588) fs3 : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)/Scsi(Pun1,Lun0)/HD(Part3,Sig25DEF F-11E D6217B60E588) fs4 : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|1)/Scsi(Pun2,Lun0)/HD(Part1,SigB9B8E4CC-0CE1-11E D6217B60E588) fs5 : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|1)/Scsi(Pun2,Lun0)/HD(Part3,SigB9B8E526-0CE1-11E D6217B60E588) blk0 : Acpi(HWP0002,0)/Pci(2|0)/Ata(Primary,Master) blk1 : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)/Scsi(Pun0,Lun0) blk2 : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)/Scsi(Pun0,Lun0)/HD(Part1,SigFB4D90C E D6217B60E588) blk3 : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)/Scsi(Pun0,Lun0)/HD(Part2,SigFB4D90D E D6217B60E588) blk4 : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)/Scsi(Pun0,Lun0)/HD(Part3,SigFB4D90EA E D6217B60E588) blk5 : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)/Scsi(Pun1,Lun0) blk6 : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)/Scsi(Pun1,Lun0)/HD(Part1,Sig25DEF F-11E D6217B60E588) blk7 : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)/Scsi(Pun1,Lun0)/HD(Part2,Sig25DEF32C-845F-11E D6217B60E588) blk8 : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|0)/Scsi(Pun1,Lun0)/HD(Part3,Sig25DEF F-11E D6217B60E588) blk9 : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|1)/Scsi(Pun2,Lun0) blkA : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|1)/Scsi(Pun2,Lun0)/HD(Part1,SigB9B8E4CC-0CE1-11E D6217B60E588) blkB : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|1)/Scsi(Pun2,Lun0)/HD(Part2,SigB9B8E512-0CE1-11E D6217B60E588) blkC : Acpi(HWP0002,100)/Pci(1|1)/Scsi(Pun2,Lun0)/HD(Part3,SigB9B8E526-0CE1-11E D6217B60E588) blkD : Acpi(HWP0002,400)/Pci(1|1)/Fibre(WWN500805F ,Lun ) startup.nsh> echo -off

73 HP-UX DRD Multiple Copies of Targets 9 of 11
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 fs2:\EFI\HPUX> hpux.efi After the reboot: # /usr/lbin/bootpath /dev/disk/disk5    # setboot -v Primary bootpath : 0/1/1/1.0x2.0x0 (/dev/rdisk/disk7) HA Alternate bootpath : 0/0/2/0.0.0x0.0x0 (/dev/rdisk/disk8) Alternate bootpath : 0/1/1/0.0x1.0x0 (/dev/rdisk/disk5) Autoboot is ON (enabled) TEST CURRENT DEFAULT all on on SELFTESTS on on early_cpu on on late_cpu on on FASTBOOT on on Platform on on Full_memory on on Memory_init on on IO_HW on on Chipset on on

74 HP-UX DRD Multiple Copies of Targets 10 of 11
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 # lvlnboot -v Boot Definitions for Volume Group /dev/vg00: Physical Volumes belonging in Root Volume Group: /dev/disk/disk5_p2 -- Boot Disk Boot: lvol1 on: /dev/disk/disk5_p2 Root: lvol3 on: /dev/disk/disk5_p2 Swap: lvol2 on: /dev/disk/disk5_p2 Dump: lvol2 on: /dev/disk/disk5_p2, 0 # drd status  ======= 03/04/13 15:03:21 EDT BEGIN Displaying DRD Clone Image Information (user=root) (jobid=ia643) * Clone Disk: /dev/disk/disk5 * Clone EFI Partition: AUTO file present, Boot loader present * Clone Rehost Status: SYSINFO.TXT not present * Clone Creation Date: /04/13 11:04:52 EDT * Last Sync Date: None * Clone Mirror Disk: None * Mirror EFI Partition: None * Original Disk: /dev/disk/disk7 * Original EFI Partition: AUTO file present, Boot loader present * Original Rehost Status: SYSINFO.TXT not present * Booted Disk: Clone Disk (/dev/disk/disk5) * Activated Disk: Original Disk (/dev/disk/disk7)  ======= 03/04/13 15:03:40 EDT END Displaying DRD Clone Image Information succeeded. (user=root) (jobid=ia643)

75 HP-UX DRD Multiple Copies of Targets 11 of 11
HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 Final reboot to go back to the original disk: # /usr/lbin/bootpath /dev/disk/disk7 # drd status ======= 03/11/13 16:41:35 EDT BEGIN Displaying DRD Clone Image Information (user=root) (jobid=ia643) * Clone Disk: /dev/disk/disk6 * Clone EFI Partition: AUTO file present, Boot loader present * Clone Rehost Status: SYSINFO.TXT not present * Clone Creation Date: /04/13 11:46:37 EDT * Last Sync Date: None * Clone Mirror Disk: None * Mirror EFI Partition: None * Original Disk: /dev/disk/disk7 * Original EFI Partition: AUTO file present, Boot loader present * Original Rehost Status: SYSINFO.TXT not present * Booted Disk: Original Disk (/dev/disk/disk7) * Activated Disk: Original Disk (/dev/disk/disk7) ======= 03/11/13 16:41:54 EDT END Displaying DRD Clone Image Information succeeded. (user=root) (jobid=ia643)

76 HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008
HP-UX DRD Wishlist HP Unix Professions Webcast May 2008 Here are some other DRD features I would like to see in the future: Command to cancel DRD cloning process (like Solaris lucancel). More comprehensive comparison of files (like Solaris lucompare). Yes, we have "drd sync –p" but it is not as good. Command to delete DRD clone (like Solaris ludelete). Command to set or display useful description for clones and boot environments (like Solaris ludesc). Terminal user interface (like Solaris lu). Multiple target disks for cloning (currently DRD supports one target and its mirror only).

77 HP Unix Professions Webcast October 2007
Thank You!


Download ppt "Acknowledgements Dusan Baljevic These slides have been used in various presentations in Australia over the last four years. This is a work-in-progress."

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