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Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, IncSlides created by Bob Koziel.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, IncSlides created by Bob Koziel."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, IncSlides created by Bob Koziel

2 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 2 Tips for using the slide show Use MS Power Point XP to view the presentation. Earlier versions will not show the animations correctly. Slides with : Click the slide to view all of its sections and animations. Some slides need to be clicked several times. will appear once the last object on the slide has appeared. Click to go to the next slide. represents an Internet link that will take you to the Web site when you click on it. Internet connection required. Clicking on the or icon will take you to the previous or the next slide. Slides with videos or sounds: Click on the picture to view videos or listen to sounds. NEXT SLIDE I NEXT SLIDE Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc

3 3 Normal View 1. Right-click on the video or sound image. 2. For videos, point to Media Clip Object and select Play. 3. For sounds, select Play Sound. 4. A dialog box will appear that will enable you to locate the file. 5. Follow directions 3-6 in Slide Show View. 6. Save the PPT with the new link. NEXT SLIDE Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc Tips Addendum This set of slides contain video and/or sound files. Preview the slide show on the computer that will be used in class. If the video or sound does not play, follow one of the set of directions below. Slide Show View 1. Click on the video or sound image. 2. A dialog box will appear that will enable you to locate the file. 3. Select the location where the PPTs are stored on the hard drive, server, or CD. 4. Open the appropriate folder and select the appropriate file. 5. Click Open. 6. Click on the video or sound image again. 7. Save the PPT with the new link.

4 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 4 Chapter 4 Storing Data: Electronic Filing Cabinets COMPUTERS IN YOUR FUTURE 2004 COMPUTERS IN YOUR FUTURE 2004 by Bryan Pfaffenberger and Bill Daley Differences between memory and storage How storage media are categorized How a storage devices performance is measured How data is stored on hard and floppy disks Characteristics of hard drives Uses of removable disks Types of optical storage media New types of storage media Chapter 4 Storing Data: Electronic Filing Cabinets What You Will Learn NEXT SLIDE

5 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 5 Hard Drive RAM Memory NEXT SLIDE Memory vs. Storage Storage, also known as mass media or auxiliary storage, refers to the various media on which a computer system can store data. Storage devices hold programs and data in units called files. Files are stored in directories or folders. Memory is a temporary workplace where the computer transfers the contents of a file while it is being used.

6 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 6 NEXT SLIDE Why is storage necessary? Storage: Retains data when the computer is turned off. Is cheaper than memory. Plays an important role during startup. Plays an input role when starting applications. Is needed for output. Devices can hold a large amount of data.

7 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 7 NEXT SLIDE Storage Devices Storage devices are: Hardware that is capable of retaining data when the electricity is turned off. Able to read (retrieve) data from a storage medium (disk/tape). Able to write (record) data to a storage medium.

8 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 8 NEXT SLIDE Types of Storage Technologies Sequential– Hardware that reads and writes data in a serial (one after the other) fashion. Random-Access– Hardware that reads and writes data without going through a sequence of locations. Magnetic– Hardware that uses disks or tapes that are coated with magnetic material. Optical– Hardware that uses laser beams to read data from plastic disks. Solid State– Devices that use nonvolatile memory chips to read and write data.

9 Tape Backup Unit Floppy DriveHard DriveJaz DriveZip Drive NEXT SLIDE Sequential – Magnetic Storage Random-Access – Magnetic Storage

10 CD-ROM / DVD Drive Magneto-Optic (MO) Drive NEXT SLIDE Sequential – Optical Storage Magnetic – Optical Storage

11 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 11 CompactFlash Memory Flash Memory Smart Card Micro Drive Memory Stick PC Card NEXT SLIDE Solid State Storage

12 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 12 The Storage Hierarchy Storage hierarchy consists of three levels. They are: Online storage– Also called primary storage, it is made up of the storage devices that are actively available to the computer system. User action is not required. Near-online storage– Also called secondary storage, it is not readily available to the computer system. The user performs an action, such as inserting a disk, to make it available. Offline storage– Also called tertiary storage or archival storage, it is not readily available to the computer system. Devices such as tape backup units store data for archival purposes. NEXT SLIDE

13 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 13 Floppy DiskHard DriveCD ROM / DVD Capacity– 720 KB to 1.44 MB Access Time– 100ms Capacity– Up to 80 GB Access Time– 6 to 12ms Capacity– CD-ROM 650 MB; DVD 17 GB Access Time– 80 to 800ms NEXT SLIDE Capacity and Speed of Storage Devices A storage devices performance is measured by: Capacity– The number of bytes of data that a device can hold. Access Time– The amount of time, in milliseconds (ms), it takes for the device to begin reading data.

14 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 14 Disks and Disk Drives A disk or diskette is a portable storage medium. Disks are circular plastic disks coated with a magnetically sensitive film. Disks work with a disk drive. High-density floppy disks are commonly used today. Floppy disks store 1.44 MB of data. SuperDisk and High FD disks store up to 250 MB of data and are downwardly compatible with floppy disks. Zip disks store up to 750 MB of data and are not downwardly compatible with floppy disks. NEXT SLIDE

15 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 15 NEXT SLIDE Protecting Your Data on Disks

16 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 16 Click on picture to view video NEXT SLIDE How Disk Drives Work Once inserted, the floppy disk spins on a spindle. The head actuator moves the read/write head over the surface of the disk to the location of the data to be read. Data is read into computers memory.

17 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 17 Track Sector Cluster NEXT SLIDE Disk Organization A disk is formatted–that is, it is divided into tracks and sectors and a file allocation table (FAT) is created. Track– circular band Sector– pie shaped section Cluster– two or more adjacent sectors FAT– keeps track of specific locations of files

18 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 18 Platter Read/Write head I NEXT SLIDE How Hard Disks Work Hard disks are a high-speed, high-capacity storage devices. They contain metal disks called platters. They contain two or more stacked platters with read/write heads for each side. They work similarly to floppy disk drives. Hard disks can be divided into partitions to enable computers to work with more than one operating system.

19 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 19 NEXT SLIDE Factors Affecting a Hard Disks Performance Seek time or positioning performance– How quickly the read/write head positions itself and begins transferring information. It is measured in milliseconds (ms). Spindle speed or transfer performance– How quickly the drive transfers data. It is measured in rotations per minute (RPM). Latency– The time it takes for the spinning platter to bring the desired data to the read/write head. It is measured in milliseconds (ms).

20 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 20 NEXT SLIDE Hard Disk Interfaces A hard disk controller provides an interface which enables the hard disk to communicate with the CPU. Types of interfaces: Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE), also called ATA or IDE/ATA Ultra DMA/66 Ultra DMA/100 Small Computer System Interface (SCSI)

21 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 21 Jaz Drive NEXT SLIDE Removable Hard Disks Removable hard disks contain platters that are enclosed in a cartridge which can be inserted or removed from a drive. They are used for data archiving and data backup.

22 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 22 Tape Backup Unit NEXT SLIDE Magnetic Tape Magnetic tape backup units store large amounts of data that are not used frequently. They use a cassette-type reel-to-reel plastic tape.

23 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 23 NEXT SLIDE CD-ROM Disks and Drives CD-ROM stands for Compact Disk-Read Only Memory. CD-ROM drives can not write data to disks. They are capable of storing 650 MB of data. They are used for storing operating systems, large application programs, and multimedia programs.

24 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 24 NEXT SLIDE CD-R and CD-RW Disks and Recorders CD-R Disks that can be read and written to. Disks can only be written to once. Drives that are capable of reading and writing data are needed. CD-RW Disks that can be read and written to. Disks are erasable. Disks can be written to many times. Drives that are capable of reading, writing and erasing data are needed.

25 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 25 NEXT SLIDE DVD-ROM Disks and Drives DVD stands for Digital Video Disk. They use technology similar to CD-ROM. They are capable of storing up to 17GB of data. Their data transfer rate is comparable to that of hard disk drives. They are compatible with CD-ROM disks. DVD-RAM– Has the ability to read/write data.

26 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 26 Other Optical Storage Technologies Write Once, Read Many (WORM) systems use 12-inch optical disks that store up to 15 GB. Magneto-Optical (MO) disks are erasable and they combine magnetic principles with optical technology. Magnet-Optical Drive NEXT SLIDE

27 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 27 Storage Horizons Florescent multilayer disc-read-only memory (FMD- ROM) uses optical technology to create disks with up to 100 layers of data. Laser beams strike the discs fluorescent layers. Up to 1 terabyte (TB) of data can be stored on each disc. NEXT SLIDE

28 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 28 NEXT SLIDE Solid State Storage Devices Solid state storage devices use nonvolatile memory chips to retain data. They do not have moving parts. They are small, lightweight, reliable, and portable.

29 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 29 NEXT SLIDE PC Cards PC or PCMCIA card– Credit card-sized device used mainly with notebook computers. Their various functions include: Modems Network adapters Additional memory or storage

30 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 30 CompactFlashMemory StickSmartMedia NEXT SLIDE Flash Memory Cards Flash memory card– A wafer-thin card used with cellular phones, MP3 players, and digital cameras. Types of flash memory cards: SmartMedia card CompactFlash card Sonys Memory Stick

31 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 31 NEXT SLIDE Smart Cards Smart card– Credit card-sized device combining flash memory with a microprocessor. It is used as a credit card. They offer more functionality, greater convenience, and higher safety than credit cards.

32 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 32 Enterprise Storage Systems Enterprise storage systems are developed by corporations to cope with their information storage needs. They use several storage technologies: Tape libraries Hard disks Optical disc libraries Tape backup systems A new technology being developed is the Storage area network– Links high-capacity storage devices to all of the organizations servers. NEXT SLIDE

33 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 33 NEXT SLIDE Chapter 4 Summary 1.Memory makes software and data available for the CPUs use. 2.RAM is volatile. 3.Storage devices are nonvolatile. 4.Storage devices are categorized by: A.Operations (read-only or read/write) B.Data access (sequential or random-access) C.Technology (magnetic, optical, or solid state) D.Hierarchy (online, near-online, or offline) 5.Disk organization includes: A.Tracks B.Sectors C.Clusters D.File allocation tables 1.Memory makes software and data available for the CPUs use. 2.RAM is volatile. 3.Storage devices are nonvolatile. 4.Storage devices are categorized by: A.Operations (read-only or read/write) B.Data access (sequential or random-access) C.Technology (magnetic, optical, or solid state) D.Hierarchy (online, near-online, or offline) 5.Disk organization includes: A.Tracks B.Sectors C.Clusters D.File allocation tables

34 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 34 NEXT SLIDE Chapter 4 Summary cont. 6.Hard disks store more data than other storage devices. 7.A hard disks performance is measured by its positioning performance and transfer rate. 8.IDE and SCSI are two hard drive interfaces. 9.Optical storage devices include: A.CD-ROM– Read-only B.CD-R– Record once C.CD-RW– Erasable, write repeatedly D.DVD-ROM– Read-only E.DVD-RAM– Read/write 6.Hard disks store more data than other storage devices. 7.A hard disks performance is measured by its positioning performance and transfer rate. 8.IDE and SCSI are two hard drive interfaces. 9.Optical storage devices include: A.CD-ROM– Read-only B.CD-R– Record once C.CD-RW– Erasable, write repeatedly D.DVD-ROM– Read-only E.DVD-RAM– Read/write

35 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc Solid state storage devices include: A.PC cards B.Flash memory cards C.Smart cards 11.Corporations develop enterprise storage systems for their information storage needs. 10.Solid state storage devices include: A.PC cards B.Flash memory cards C.Smart cards 11.Corporations develop enterprise storage systems for their information storage needs. Chapter 4 Summary cont. NEXT SLIDE

36 Copyright © 2003 Prentice Hall, Inc 36 THE END


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