Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Social Values Research : Tackling the Hidden Dimension Presentation to the MRIA Ottawa Chapter November 24, 2005 Keith.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Social Values Research : Tackling the Hidden Dimension Presentation to the MRIA Ottawa Chapter November 24, 2005 Keith."— Presentation transcript:

1 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Social Values Research : Tackling the Hidden Dimension Presentation to the MRIA Ottawa Chapter November 24, 2005 Keith Neuman, Ph.D. Social Values Research : Tackling the Hidden Dimension Presentation to the MRIA Ottawa Chapter November 24, 2005 Keith Neuman, Ph.D. ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P

2 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P The MARKETING RESEARCH AND INTELLIGENCE ASSOCIATION Ottawa Chapter would like to acknowledge the support of the following organizations. Without their kind support we could not continue to offer quality programs such as this one. 2

3 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Social values – what they are and why they matter International social values model Examples of potential applications Questions and discussion What I will cover 3

4 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Formed early in life, usually fixed by ones mid-teens Shaped by ones upbringing, family life, schooling, community and cultural influences For individuals, can evolve slowly over time through education and life experiences For societies, can evolve as older generations die off and are replaced by younger generations with different values What are social values? 4

5 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Values Demographics Other Individual Characteristics Behavior Beliefs Attitudes Why social values matter 5

6 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Traditional model - Social Norms Enduring beliefs that a specific mode of conduct or end-state of existence is personally or socially preferable to an opposite or converse mode of conduct or end-state of existence (Rokeach) Contemporary models – Mental postures A persons mental posture or fundamental world view, that sets the context in which to they react situations, events, opportunities and challenges (de Vulpian ) Two models of social values 6

7 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Traditional models of values research Thorstein Veblen: Theory of the Leisure Class (1899) Abraham Maslow: Hierarchy of Needs (1954) Milton Rokeach: Terminal and Instrumental Values (1969) Limitations: Values defined in terms of social norms or ideals Respondents self-identify their values or rank order a value set – social desirability bias & lack of differentiation 7

8 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Rokeach – 18 Terminal values A comfortable life An exciting life A sense of accomplishment A world at peace A world of beauty Equality Family security Freedom Happiness Inner harmony Mature love National security Pleasure Salvation Self respect Social recognition True friendship Wisdom 8

9 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Contemporary models of social values Yankelovich: Yankelovich Monitor (1971) Arnold Mitchell: VALS/SRI (1978) Ron Inglehardt: World Values (1981) Alain de Vulpian: Le Système Cofremca de Suivi des Courants Socio-Culturel (3SC) Cofremca (France,1974) CROP/Environics (Canada,1983) Environics (USA,1992) 9

10 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Contemporary models of social values Defines a universal set of values (positive and negative), but individuals hold particular values to varying degrees Research presents real or hypothetical situations to which respondents react, rather than being expected to self-analyze Focus on the study of socio-cultural change -- identifying and tracking values that differentiate individuals and speak to the future 10

11 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P 3SC social values research in 20+ countries 11

12 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Nationally representative surveys of 2,600 Canadians, aged 15+ Fielded every year since 1983 In-home, self-completion methodology Selected client themes/topics: Automotive Financial Services Food/drink Technology Usage Media Leisure Health/Personal care Tourism Politics A battery of 300+ sociocultural statements measuring and tracking 102 social values and mental postures 3SC Canada – Basic methodology 12

13 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P These four questions, from different sections of the survey, join together after factor analysis to create a trend How social value are measured 13

14 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Confidence and adaptability Goals, motivations Social relations, family/friends Tradition Social liberalism Personal growth Ethics Consumer motivations Themes captured through social values 14

15 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Acceptance of Violence Active Government Adaptability to Complexity Adaptive Navigation Advertising as Stimulus American Dream Anomie/Aimlessness Attraction for Crowds Aversion to Complexity Brand Apathy Buying on Impulse Celebrating Passages Civic Apathy Civic Engagement Community Involvement Concern for Appearance Confidence in Advertising Confidence in Big Business Confidence in Small Business Cultural Assimilation Culture Sampling Discerning Hedonism Discriminating Consumerism Duty Ecological Concern Ecological Fatalism Effort Toward Health Emotional Control Enthusiasm for Technology Entrepreneurialism Equal Relationship with Youth Ethical Consumerism Everyday Ethics Everyday Rage Faith in Science Fatalism Fear of Violence Financial Security Flexible Families Flexible Gender Identity Gender Parity Global Consciousness Heterarchy Holistic Health Importance of Aesthetics Importance of Brand Importance of Spontaneity Intuition & Impulse Interest in the Unexplained Introspection & Empathy Joy of Consumption Just Deserts Largesse Oblige Living Virtually Look Good Feel Good Meaningful Moments More Power for Business More Power for Media More Power for Politics Multiculturalism Mysterious Forces National Pride Need for Status Recognition Networking Obedience to Authority Ostentatious Consumption Parochialism Patriarchy Penchant for Risk Personal Challenge Personal Control Personal Escape Personal Expression Primacy of the Family Propriety Protection of Privacy Pursuit of Intensity Racial Fusion Rejection of Authority Rejection of Order Religion a la Carte Religiosity Saving on Principle Search for Roots Selective Use of Personal Services Sensualism Sexism Sexual Permissiveness Skepticism of Advertising Social Responsibility Social Intimacy Spiritual Quest Technological Anxiety Time Stress Traditional Family Traditional Gender Identity Vitality Voluntary Simplicity Work Ethic Xenophobia Gadget zeal 102 social values 15

16 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P The tendency to save and accumulate money that is motivated by a moral rather than an economic impulse. Saving on Principle If I put money aside it would be mainly: To safeguard my future To buy something I want Which of these two opinions about money do you hold: Money is for saving Money is for spending Examples of social values 16

17 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Joy of Consumption To spend, to buy myself something new, is for me one of the greatest pleasures in life. I often get great pleasure from looking at advertising. I love to buy consumer goods (excluding those basic ones essential to run a household). To buy myself something new is always very gratifying to me. Intense gratification through the consumption of consumer goods, other than basic necessities. Deriving great pleasure from having the latest products or services. People strong on this trend are often more excited by the act of buying, than by the use of the products. Examples of social values 17

18 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Violence is a part of life. Its no big deal. Its acceptable to use physical force to get something you really want. The important thing is to get what you want. When a person cant take it anymore and feels like he/she is going to explode, to be a little violent can relieve the tension. Its no big deal. Believing that violence is an inevitable part of life. People strongest on this trend even accept violence as an outlet for letting off steam or as a way of getting what they want. For some, violence is becoming the only way they can make themselves heard in todays world. Acceptance of Violence Examples of social values 18

19 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P AIMLESSNESS ACCEPTANCE OF VIOLENCE ADAPTABILITY TO COMPLEXITY IN LIFE ECOLOGICAL ALARMISM ANOMIE APOCALYPTIC ANXIETY TECHNOLOGICAL ANXIETY BELONGING TO THE "GLOBAL VILLAGE" ATTRACTION TO NATURE ADVERTISING AS STIMULUS ATTRACTION FOR CROWDS ATTRACTION TO THE SIMPLE PLEASURES OF LIFE RISK AVERSION NEED FOR AUTONOMY NEED FOR STATUS RECOGNITION NEED FOR PERSONAL ACHIEVEMENT SEARCH FOR ROOTS NEED FOR ESCAPE CONFIDENCE IN ADVERTISING CONFIDENCE IN GOVERNMENT CONFIDENCE IN BIG BUSINESS CONFIDENCE IN SMALL BUSINESS EMOTIONAL CONNECTIVITY AWARENESS OF MORTALITY GLOBAL ECOLOGICAL AWARENESS ECOLOGICAL CONSUMPTION ETHICAL CONSUMERISM OSTENTATIOUS CONSUMPTION EARLY ADOPTION STRATEGIC CONSUMPTION CONSUMPTIVITY CONTROL OF DESTINY RACING AGAINST THE CLOCK PERSONAL CREATIVITY SKEPTICISM TOWARD BIG BUSINESS SKEPTICISM TOWARD SMALL BUSINESS SOCIAL DARWINISM DECONSUMPTION CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE AVERSION TO COMPLEXITY IN LIFE EFFORT FOR HEALTH EQUAL RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUTH EQUALITY OF THE SEXES COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT ENTHUSIASM FOR CONSUMPTION ENTHUSIASM FOR TECHNOLOGY FULFILLMENT THROUGH WORK SAVING ON PRINCIPLE EVERYDAY ETHICS FATALISM PENCHANT FOR RISK-TAKING HETERARCHY HYPER-RATIONALITY IMPORTANCE OF PHYSICAL BEAUTY IMPORTANCE OF BRAND IMPORTANCE OF SPONTANEITY IN DAILY LIFE IMPORTANCE OF NATIONAL SUPERIORITY IMPORTANCE OF AESTHETICS IMPORTANCE OF PRICE PURSUIT OF INTENSITY AND EMOTIONAL EXPERIENCES INTEREST IN THE MYSTERIOUS INTROSPECTION AND EMPATHY REPRIORITIZING OF MONEY REPRIORITIZING OF WORK ETHNIC INTOLERANCE NEO-ROMANTICISM FLEXIBLE DEFINITION OF FAMILY NEW SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY OPENNESS TOWARD OTHERS SEXUAL PERMISSIVENESS FEAR OF VIOLENCE ADAPTIVE NAVIGATION JOY OF CONSUMPTION INTUITIVE POTENTIAL FINANCIAL CONCERN REGARDING THE FUTURE PRIMACY OF THE FAMILY PRIMACY OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION UTILITARIAN CONSUMERISM SPIRITUAL QUEST PURSUIT OF NOVELTY PURSUIT OF ORIGINALITY PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS TO THE DETRIMENT OF DUTY REGIONALISM REJECTION OF AUTHORITY REJECTION OF ORDER RELIGIOSITY NETWORKING DISCRIMINATING CONSUMERISM POLYSENSORIALITY CONCERN FOR APPEARANCE FLEXIBILITY OF PERSONALITY FLEXIBILITY OF GENDER IDENTITY TIME MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY VITALITY LEGACY MEANING OF LIFE MEANING OF LIFE=FAMILY MEANING OF LIFE=MATERIAL POSSESSIONS RITUAL INTUITION ATTRACTION TO VIOLENCE SOCIAL LEARNING CONTROL OF PRIVACY CULTURAL FUSION INDIVIDUALISM AND IDEALISM CONFORMITY AND EXCLUSION OUTER - DIRECTED INNER - DIRECTED Canadian Sociocultural Map 19

20 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Social Values Orientation Individualism and Idealism Conformity and Exclusion Social Success, Materialism and Pride Security, Stability and Exclusion Personal independence and control Adherence to social ethics that improve lives Rejection of authority, conformity, materialism Personal fulfilment through experimentation Physical and moral well-being important Openness is enriching Conformist and materialistic values Social success, displaying status Seek clearly defined structures Feel excluded and lack purpose Seek security, stability, leadership Accept civil disobedience, violence Outer-Directed Inner-Directed Experience and Personal Development Autonomy and Well-being 20

21 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Consumer Orientation and Motivations Individualism and Idealism Conformity and Exclusion Outer-Directed Inner-Directed Informed, skeptical, and demanding Utilitarian, fundamental Quality of life Purchasing control, autonomy Ethical Innovative and in Personalization and personal development Singular, unique, distinctive Information, enthusiasm (consumptivity) Strategic consumption Aspirational consumption Prestige and display of brands Novelty and gadgets Pleasure, hedonism Price focus Security (brands with a long history) Mass-market consumption and brands Utilitarian Social Success, Materialism and Pride Autonomy and Well-being Experience and Personal Development Security, Stability and Exclusion 21

22 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Workplace Motivations Individualism and Idealism Conformity and Exclusion Outer-Directed Inner-Directed Job is an opportunity to learn/grow Highly skilled, work independently Work must be personally/socially meaningful Titles mean nothing – its what you do that matters Job is an opportunity to create and experience Highly skilled, moderate control over work Prefer high paced, action-oriented team environments Wait till the client sees this! Job represents status/titles Moderate skills, moderate control over work Prefer hierarchical environments To get ahead you have to work hard and pay your dues Job is just a source of (low) income Fewer FT/PT, more at home/students Few skills, little control over work Im just a cog in the wheel, working for the weekend Social Success, Materialism and Pride Autonomy and Well-being Experience and Personal Development Security, Stability and Exclusion 22

23 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P INDIVIDUALISM AND IDEALISM CONFORMITY AND EXCLUSION OUTER-DIRECTED INNER-DIRECTED 3SC Canada Social Values WELL-BEING PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT SUCCESS EXCLUSION Gender Men Women Age : Age : Age : Age : 60 + Age :15-24 Age 23

24 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P _X_X Top Quintile Bottom Quintile Rather than looking at Top-2 Box scores or mean scores, we look at top tails of the distribution (quintiles) to detect social change Those who fall into the top tail of a trend are seen to be leading agents of change on that trend Method of detecting social change 24

25 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Social values: Three Applications

26 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Application 1: Measuring social change

27 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P INDIVIDUALITY AUTHORITY Idealism & Autonomy Status & Security FULFILMENT SURVIVAL Authenticity & Responsibility Exclusion & Intensity Social Change: Canada - US

28 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Canada U.S. Father of family must be master in his own house Canada and the United States: Agree

29 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Father of family must be master in his own house Canada and the United States: Women agree Women 10 Women with Post- secondary 17 Singles Canada U.S. 29

30 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P INDIVIDUALITY AUTHORITY Idealism & Autonomy Status & Security FULFILMENT SURVIVAL Authenticity & Responsibility Exclusion & Intensity Deep South Plains Mid West South Atlantic Texarkana Mid Atlantic Mountain New England Pacific B.C. Ontario Atlantic Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta Quebec Regions of North America ( combined) 30

31 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Application 2: Issue communications

32 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P EXAMPLE: Rejection of Everyday Ethics If the government sent me a cheque by mistake, Id keep the money unless they asked for it back. Gender Age Household Income 32

33 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P INDIVIDUALISM AND IDEALISM CONFORMITY AND EXCLUSION OUTER-DIRECTED INNER-DIRECTED Id keep the money Value Profile 33

34 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Feel at some liberty to disregard rules they think are wrong or unfair. Promote idea that there is a national duty for everyone to do their share in looking after public money: It is part of the Canadian identity. Communicate the technological sophistication now used in tracking payment errors High incidence among youth makes it important to how youth being treated as adults. Civil disobedience 221 National superiority 150 Gadget zeal 131 Pursuit of originality 127 Equal relationship with youth 117 Implications for communication with this group Penchant for risk taking 181 Adaptability to complexity 140 Acceptance of violence 152 Risk of punishment is not a deterrent They take chances and are confident they can roll with the punches. 34

35 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Application 3: On the ground marketing

36 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Taking social values to the street level Link social values to precisely-defined populations and market segments through geodemographics (PRIZM CE ) Connects every neighbourhood and postal code in Canada Link to lifestyle, media use and purchase patterns through other comprehensive data bases (e.g. PMB) Classification of all 54,000 Canadian neighbourhoods into 66 distinct lifestyle types 36

37 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P PRIZM CE geodemographic system High-Rise Apartment Building Single Detached, Semis, Rowhouses, Low-Rise Apartments Neighbourhood Boundary: Census Dissemination Area ( households) 37

38 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Ottawa – Gatineau Everyday Ethics 38

39 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Ottawa – Gatineau Penchant for Risk-taking 39

40 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P PRIZM CE Lifestyle Clusters Created from demographics, behaviours, and social values 40

41 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Case study: Health club marketing campaign Profile of consumers obtained from link between PRIZM CE and PMB data Profile analysed with social values to identify two key markets: Health-conscious Appearance-conscious 41

42 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Who Belongs to Health Clubs? 13 key segments have a high propensity 42

43 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Importance of Physical Beauty Tendency to place a high priority on a youthful and attractive body and being willing to make a considerable effort to attain and keep such a bodily appearance. Values reflecting Health vs. Appearance Effort toward Health The commitment to focus on diet and exercise in order to feel better and have a healthy, wholesome lifestyle. A willingness to transform ones lifestyle through exercise and radical changes in diet. 43

44 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Autonomy & Well-Being Social Success, Materialism & Pride Security, Stability & Exclusion INDIVIDUALISM AND IDEALISM CONFORMITY AND EXCLUSION OUTER-DIRECTED INNER-DIRECTED Openness & Experience Social Values Map Health Conscious PRIZM CE Targets Appearance Conscious PRIZM CE Targets 44

45 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Skews to (some 25-34) Very well educated; white collar Families & empty nests with some younger singles/couples High incomes: ~$ Health-Conscious Target Appearance-Conscious Target Skews to Well educated; mixed occupations Couples and young families Quite ethnic (~40%) Incomes: ~$ Targets for two different messages 45

46 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Use behavioural data to identify the most relevant club features and activities to highlight on the pieces Preferences to highlight in marketing material 46

47 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Clubs design is important Environmentally conscious features/practices Joining the club to take charge of their fitness Will do research and demand information; will not just accept advice Clubs design is important Avoid ethnic marketing Go to the club as a little escape from the daily grind Want to meet people with similar interests May respond well to high-tech exercise machines Selected social values to help shape messaging 47

48 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Rank postal walks based on concentration of each target groups Mail different pieces to two different sets of routes Precision targeting of unaddressed mail 48

49 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Conclusion Social values are a key piece of the puzzle in understanding the society we live in, and how it is changing Social values can be measured, at the macro and micro levels Social values research has an important role: Identifying emerging trends at the macro level Profiling key target groups within the population Gaining deeper insight than is possible through demographic and attitudinal measures alone 49

50 ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Toronto Ottawa Calgary ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P


Download ppt "ENVIRONICS R E S E A R C H G R O U P Social Values Research : Tackling the Hidden Dimension Presentation to the MRIA Ottawa Chapter November 24, 2005 Keith."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google