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University of Reading Carbon management programme Opps and Quantification workshop Project Leads: Nigel Hodgson & Denise Shearman Project Sponsors: Prof.

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Presentation on theme: "University of Reading Carbon management programme Opps and Quantification workshop Project Leads: Nigel Hodgson & Denise Shearman Project Sponsors: Prof."— Presentation transcript:

1 University of Reading Carbon management programme Opps and Quantification workshop Project Leads: Nigel Hodgson & Denise Shearman Project Sponsors: Prof Tony Downes & Colin Robbins

2 Objectives of today Identify and prioritise carbon saving opportunities for your HEI Understand and practise the quantification process Engage and mobilise the wider team on carbon management

3 Workshop agenda Introductions/background Where are we now –Baseline –Target What we can do about it –RAP tool and DECs –Brainstorming & prioritisation –The project process Quantification Next steps

4 What is Carbon Management? Technical – Information – Discipline – Projects – Continuous improvement Organisational – Policy & decision making – Cultural – Communications – Permission to question The What and the How Comprehensive action plan Good practice Walking the talk Taking responsibility Makes financial sense Involves everyone

5 Alignment with hefce

6 Where are we now?

7 HECM6 – the timeline We are here

8 Carbon management status

9 Emissions baseline scope Electricity Fossil fuels Buildings Water Fleet Business miles BASELINE SCOPE Waste Commuting Transport Other Refrigerant gases ?

10 Current carbon projects

11 Ideas generation - Sources Project List (Kept in the CMPR) Existing Projects Site Surveys Suggestion Schemes Brainstorming Baseline Analysis Carbon Reduction Suggestions We Need Your Ideas Now DECs & RAP Tool

12 Current projects Make a list of current projects CHP energy centre Wind farm Pipework and valve insulation Heating controls Lighting control - solar Projects identified from previous Carbon Trust surveys Heating zoning Energy awareness High frequency lighting LED lighting Passive infra red lighting control Automatic computer shutdown

13 Exercise – Other projects What other projects are happening at the University that may reduce or increase carbon emissions In groups discuss for 5-10 minutes and then feedback

14 RAP tool and DECs

15 Ideas generation - Sources Project List (Kept in the CMPR) Existing Projects Site Surveys Suggestion Schemes Brainstorming Baseline Analysis Carbon Reduction Suggestions We Need Your Ideas Now DECs & RAP Tool

16 Getting the best out of DECs DECs are not EPCs Measure of how effectively the building is used Create multiple league tables by building type that focus surveys and investment Use within awareness campaigns Baseline tool helps to rank and prioritise

17 Where is the University? 49 buildings currently fall within EPBD Average DEC score – 116 Schedule No. Ref.Building NameGross internal Area GIA m2 Year 1 DEC Rating Year 2 DEC Rating 1W059Agriculture7, D170 'G' 2W030AMS7, F119 'E' 3W135Carrington 2,22372 C55 'C' 4W006Chemistry7, E146 'F' 5W025Engineering3, F63 'C' 6W050Facilities Management1, F92 'D' 7W047Food Biosciences8, E121 'E' 8W084Foxhill House1,83675 C150 'F' 9W049Geography1, F72 'C' 10W005Geoscience1, F141 'F' 12W001HumSS13, F85 'D' 13W071ICMA Centre1, F128 'F'

18 Generating ideas

19 Ideas generation - Sources Project List (Kept in the CMPR) Existing Projects Site Surveys Suggestion Schemes Brainstorming Baseline Analysis Carbon Reduction Suggestions We Need Your Ideas Now DECs & RAP Tool

20 ??% Needs high commitment and commercial /risk management skills Renewable Technologies Biomass boilers, Wind Solar thermal, GSHP Organisational realignment Policy change, process review Design & Asset Management Low CO2 new build Property rationalisation Procurement changes 10% Longer term, larger scale Invest to Save Insulation and heat recovery Lighting and controls Combined heat and power (CHP) Plant / fleet replacement 20% Mature technologies, medium investment Good Housekeeping Metering and Targeting Behaviour change and training Regular inspection & Audit 10% Low cost but requires human resources How can the targets be met? 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60%

21 Inspirational organisations & projects Lighting controls – University of Edinburgh Fuel cell CHP - Woking Fenestration (reducing air leaks) – Derby University Low Carbon vehicle for VC - Southampton University Server virtualisation – Sheffield Hallam University

22 Inspirational organisations & projects (Continued) 1.5MW wind turbine - Swaffham Energy awareness campaign – University of Glasgow Dial4Light scheme - Germany University of Hertfordshire Full time travel plan co-ordinator Limited parking permits Free park and ride facility University owned bus service Car sharing database Subsidised local travel for students Cycling facilities Walking promotion Information

23 Inspirational organisations & projects Stockton-on-Tees In-house driver training programme for fuel efficiency Revenue gained from training of external organisations 10-15% reduction in fuel use for every person trained Central Bedfordshire LED replacement for traditional lanterns at end-of-life Pilot saw ~ 75% reduction in circuit wattage ¼ year payback for uplift in capital cost

24 Individual Vision What would your place of work be like if you had the power to make it any way you wanted? Where would you work? How would people get to their workplaces? What would the buildings be like? How would you meet with people? What are other people doing? How would teaching/research fit in? What kind of energy would be used for heating? For transportation? For travel? Where would it come from? How would the air, water, and environment be kept clean?

25 Our Vision Our target for 2015/16 is 35% reduction on 2008/09 baseline What items on the individual visions can we all get behind? Are there any conflicts? What are the larger hurdles likely to be? Our current stated vision … What does this mean? A vision without a plan is just a dream. A plan without a vision is just drudgery. But a vision with a plan can change the world

26 Brainstorming and prioritisation

27 Brainstorming rules How to get the most out of the session Participation – feel free to speak up Ideas - build on others ideas Sharing experiences Reserve judgement NO qualifications Forbidden phrases that wont work because….. we cant do that because….. that would never be approved…..

28 Brainstorming streams IT and Systems Water and Energy Transport Waste Other

29 Ideas Generation - Brainstorming In your groups, brainstorm any ideas that occur to you across the areas of the scope: Bear in mind the Organisations other relevant strategies Focus on large baseline factors Buildings, transport, water, procurement, HR, organisational practices, day-day management, etc Opportunities Raise ideas that you have brought with you What you can do What would you like to see happen? Looking for quantity at this stage not quality

30 Have generated a long list of ideas Short term Longer term Easy wins Inspirational Integration Etc Need to produce a quantified shortlist and begin to prioritise Starting right now… Prioritisation

31 Ease & Effect rules Ease factors to consider: Cost (capital and revenue) Cost (staff time) Staff support Technical practicality Effect factors: Carbon savings Galvanising/engaging staff support Public awareness

32 Prioritisation – Ease & Effect Matrix V. Effective Moderate Ineffective DifficultModerateEasy EFFECT ON EMISSIONS EASE OF IMPLEMENTATION

33 Quantification

34 Key Carbon Saving Opportunities

35 Focusing Effort Important to focus effort to gain best effect Do you know how your organisations consumption pattern compares to the sector average? Are there large special loads? 2006 HE Sector Carbon Emissions (Hefce Jan 2010)

36 Space Heating Opportunities Improve Building Fabric –Install/ Upgrade Insulation –Double / Secondary Glazing –Draft-Proofing Install / Optimise Control Systems –Optimum Start –Sequencing –Zoning Pipe Insulation Boiler Upgrades Boiler Fuel Switching Breakdown of Energy Use (kWh) in HE buildings (CTV020)

37 Lighting Opportunities Retrofit / Replace Fittings Control Systems –Presence detection (microwave or infrared) –Lux level switching –Localised well labelled controls where automation infeasible –Zoning Remember to look inside and outside! Breakdown of Energy Use (kWh) in HE buildings (CTV020)

38 ICT Opportunities Management Software –Auto shutdown software for non-critical machines Flat Panel Monitors –60% savings! Printer Rationalisation –Centralise Server Room / Data Centres –Virtualisation –Heat Recovery & Cooling A large area where energy use is expanding What will your IT infrastructure look like in 10 years? Breakdown of Energy Use (kWh) in HE buildings (CTV020)

39 Travel Opportunities What are you including in scope? Travel Planning Fleet Driver Training (Safed) Travel Surveys Incentive Schemes –Bike to Work –Car Sharing 2006 HE Sector Carbon Emissions (Hefce Jan 2010)

40 Other Opportunities Awareness Raising –Potential Savings of 5-10% (CTG001) Monitoring & Targeting –Potential Savings of 5-12% (CTV027) Good Practice Maintenance 2006 HE Sector Carbon Emissions (Hefce Jan 2010) What activities have you already undertaken?

41 RAP tool

42 What is the RAP Tool Rapid Assessment of Potential Considers key opportunities around buildings and transportation Packed with data on how to quantify different types of opportunity Key team members have their own assessment sheet Individual copies returned to PL for collation into tool

43 RAP Tool Process Project Leader will distribute the tool containing baseline data For buildings and transport tabs team members complete: –Score each opportunity against applicability and likelihood – Document any assumptions you make –Identify how easy this project will be (1=Easy / 3 = Hard) –Identify who will take responsibility for the project –Should take approximately of 1-2hours to complete Return to the Project Leader to collate into the master

44 Following The RAP Tool Project Leader will use master RAP Tool to identify which projects will be further quantified based on ease and effect Project Team members will refine areas identified in the RAP Tool into distinct quantified projects Quantified Projects will be recorded in the CMPR Tool by PL (to be released in September)

45 The project process

46 Pushing projects down the funnel First ideas Brainstorm SWAG CMP content Detailed Planning Implementation £ Cost of tonnes of CO 2 saved confidence range Off the head estimate Using rules of thumb & guidance Contracted price

47 The project process CMT input Output Existing projects RAP Target (xx%) RAP GAP Existing projects Brainstorm Project ideas Long list Prioritisation Short list Ease-Effect 1 min Research 1 hr DECs Quantification CMPR 1 day

48 The project process CMT input Output Existing projects RAP Target (xx%) RAP GAP Existing projects Brainstorm Project ideas Long list Prioritisation Short list Ease-Effect 1 min Research DECs Quantification CMPR Improve RAP estimates 1 hr

49 The project process Initial Prioritisation –Typically should take 1 min per opportunity –RAP combined with Ease and Effect Project Register Content –1-2 hour per opportunity –RAP tool refinement –Grouping into larger projects –What questions do you need answering –What assumptions can be made –Using rules of thumb-guides Approval: including cost –At least 1 day per opportunity

50 Minimum for CMP Initial Prioritisation –Typically should take 1 min per opportunity –RAP combined with Ease and Effect Project Register Content –1-2 hour per opportunity –RAP tool refinement –Grouping into larger projects –What questions do you need answering –What assumptions can be made –Using rules of thumb-guides Approval: including cost –At least 1 day per opportunity

51 Ideally for CMP Initial Prioritisation –Typically should take 1 min per opportunity –RAP combined with Ease and Effect Project Register Content –1-2 hour per opportunity –RAP tool refinement –Grouping into larger projects –What questions do you need answering –What assumptions can be made –Using rules of thumb-guides Approval: including cost –At least 1 day per opportunity

52 Basic Quantification Techniques

53 Quantification – the basics Wattage (kW) Running time (Hours) X = Consumption (kWh) Unit price £/kWh X X Carbon factor Elec: Gas: kgCO 2 /kWh = = Carbon savings kgCO 2 Financial Savings £

54 Quantification – the basics 30 x (60- 11) = kW 10 hrs x 5 x 52 = 2,600 hrs X = 3,822 kWh Unit price £0.01/kWh X X Carbon factor Elec: kgCO 2 /kWh = = 2,152 kgCO 2 £38.22

55 Moving Beyond RAP

56 Beyond RAP How the RAP tool works –Energy –Carbon –Cost What now –What assumptions did we make? –Are they reasonable? –Get specific!!

57 RAP Tool Estimate Total carbon emissions of all buildings = 940 tonnes Estimated in the RAP Tool that 30% of buildings have BMS systems and 60% have not been optimised (i.e. 30% applicability and 60% likelihood) The RAP Tool also adds a factor of 50% since the BMS will not cover all of the buildings energy consumption. The RAP Tool then calculates amount of baseline covered by the opportunity: 940 tonnes x 30% x 60% x 50% = 84.6 tonnes Carbon Trust research shows that a 5% saving in all building fuels so the RAP Tool calculates the potential carbon saving as: 84.6 tonnes x 5% = 4.23 tonnes (saved)

58 Detail Quantification To complete a detailed quantification you need actual baseline buildings fitted with a BMS. The 30% of buildings was actually 2 similar buildings. They had a total carbon footprint of 307 tonnes and their BMS hadnt been optimised. It was also established the BMS controlled 80% of each buildings energy. The recalculated (detailed) saving was: 307 tonnes x 80% x 5% = tonnes (saved)

59 Quantifying Projects

60 Carbon Trust Publications CTV020 – HE Sector CTG001 – Awareness CTV003 – HVAC CTV027 – Metering EGC078 – Sport & Leisure ECG019 – Offices CTV021 – Lighting Plus many more.....

61 Quantifying Brainstormed Opportunities Quantify a selection of brainstormed opportunities Either in groups or all together Discuss how you might go about moving it forward

62 Next Steps

63 Project Definition Template All projects need to be in the template (Appendix B) Team need to document: –Project Reference –Owner –Department –Description –Benefits –Funding –Resources –Ensuring Success –Measuring Success –Timing –Notes

64 CM team actions Baseline data –Assist data collection as required Finalise identity of existing projects –Let PL know about other projects and owner –PL compiles list of existing projects RAP tool –PL meetings with individual team members to complete tool sections, CM team Provide general support to the programme by: –Talking to colleagues –Direct & indirect support –Being positive

65 Questions...

66 Thank you

67 Raising the Bar

68 Performing initial quantification on renewables and CHP to reach higher levels of savings Includes Wind Solar PV Biomass Heating Combined Heat & Power

69 Solar PV - Overview Assess your options –Building integrated (South facing at ~35 degrees) –Ground mount? How sunny is it in your area? Making the business case stack up: –Feed in Tariff –Low Carbon Buildings Programme Phase 2 Get the best panels –17.4% is available; 20% imminent with 40% mooted in the next few years

70 Solar Photovoltaics Calculating Annual Energy Generated kWh= 750kWh x kilowatt peak –750kW = Factor based on typical performance from BIS research –kWp = Maximum theoretical output kWp = Area / Area = space available = Space factor based on a high efficiency panel TIP: You should always try and go for the highest efficiency panels (17.4% is about the best at the moment) Typical cost for solar PV is £5,000/kWp

71 Solar PV Exercise For a large building with 120 sqm of available south facing roof space calculate: Energy generated each year Total revenue based on 15p/kWh Total carbon saved Estimated cost of installation with 50% LCBP Phase 2 grant

72 Solar PV Exercise Answers For a large building with 120 sqm of available south facing roof space calculate: : Energy generated each year –13,393 kWh Total revenue based on 15p/kWh –£2,009 Total carbon saved –7 tonnes Estimated cost of installation –£44,643 Update CMPR

73 Biomass - Overview What sort of and how much biomass do you have available? What type of scheme do you want to do? Normally installed with gas backup / effective thermal storage Do you have the space – You need to stock pile around 4-6 months fuel Normally installed with gas backup but effective thermal storage should be sufficient Do you have the space – You need to stock pile around 4-6 months fuel For biomass power schemes get independent due-diligences before signing contract

74 Biomass Heating Calculating Annual Carbon Saving Need to estimate running costs and carbon emissions of existing and proposed system The new system will be more efficient, so youll need to calculate consumption of the new system. Fuel costs will be different TIP: Fuel Consumption = Heat Generated / Efficiency Typical cost for biomass heating is £600 - £1,000 kW installed

75 Biomass Exercise For a large building with two old (circa 1950s) 400 kW oil fired boilers (estimated efficiency 50%) and an annual fuel consumption of 2,900,000kWh calculate: Annual energy consumption of the new system if the two oil boilers are replaced with two biomass condensing boilers (efficiency 86%) Total annual cost saving (oil=5p/kWh / pellet=4.2p/kWh) Total carbon saved Estimated cost of installation with 50% LCBP Phase 2 grant

76 Biomass Exercise Answers For a large building with two old (circa 1950s) 400 kW oil fired boilers (estimated efficiency 50%) and an annual consumption of 2,900,000kWh calculate : Energy saved by replacing with two biomass condensing boilers (efficiency 86%) –1,686,047 kWh Total annual cost saving (oil=5p/kWh / pellet=4.2p/kWh) –£74,186 Total carbon saved –770 tonnes Estimated cost of installation with 50% LCBP Phase 2 grant –£240,000 - £400,000

77 Combined heat and power - Overview Centralised power generation very inefficient Assessing your CHP opportunities –Large heat load essential –Estimating profiles is possible, but actual half hourly data is best –5,000 running hours minimum

78 Combined Heat & Power Calculating Carbon Saving Need to calculate the consumption and energy generated (heat and electricity/ power) of the CHP system. Then use these figures to calculate equivalent outputs from a tradition system (grid electricity, heat from a gas boiler) Image Courtesy of the Institute of Engineering & Technology

79 Combined Heat & Power CHP Electricity Generated = Peak kWe rating X Hours X Availability Heat Generated =Electricity Generated X Power : Heat Ratio Gas Consumed = Electricity generated /CHP efficiency Traditional Gas Consumed = Heat generated/Boiler Efficiency TIP: Typical cost for CHP is £800/kWe Typical power to heat ratio =1.2

80 CHP Exercise For a 100kWe CHP with an efficiency of 35% calculate: Heat Generated by the CHP in a year Annual Carbon Savings Annual Cost Savings Capital Cost Assume the CHP has been sized so it can run at maximum load for 16 hours a day all year but is only available 95% of the year.

81 CHP Exercise Answers Heat Generated by the CHP in a Year 663,936 kWh Annual Carbon Savings 164 tCO2 Annual Cost Savings £30,478 Capital Cost £80,000 Update CMPR


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