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Tips & Techniques for Writing Effective Procedures To move forward, backward or to a specific slide, move your cursor over the hidden arrows/menu in the.

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Presentation on theme: "Tips & Techniques for Writing Effective Procedures To move forward, backward or to a specific slide, move your cursor over the hidden arrows/menu in the."— Presentation transcript:

1 Tips & Techniques for Writing Effective Procedures To move forward, backward or to a specific slide, move your cursor over the hidden arrows/menu in the bottom left corner of each slide and make a selection. You can also use your space bar (forward); or your Page Up/Page Dn keys (backward/forward). The quality of the procedures you write has a direct impact on the quality of your companys products or services.

2 Orientation High Impact Writing Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing: Steps 4-5 Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing: Steps 1-3 Table of Contents Click on any colored bullet found on the Content pages to jump to a specific section.

3 Orientation This material was developed to help you write effective procedures that clearly define the standards, processes and desired results in your workplace. You will gain tips and techniques to help you write more effectively, clarify your thinking and communicate information clearly. The Benefits of Writing an Effective Procedure Help Your Reader Return to main Table of Contents Avoid 8 Common Mistakes

4 The Benefits of Writing an Effective Procedure When you adopt effective procedure writing practices, you reap a host of benefits: Accuracy: tasks completed correctly. Efficiency: errors minimized; tasks completed first time. Consistency: desired level of quality maintained. Higher Standards: work completed quickly and safely; regulatory compliance maintained. Effective Training: training is faster, easier, smoother. Personal Credibility: you gain a sense of accomplishment; recognition for your ability to communicate effectively. In short, by improving your procedure writing skills, you can give yourself and your company a competitive edge. Orientation

5 Avoid 8 Common Mistakes To improve your writing skills, avoid the eight most common mistakes procedure writers make: 1. The message is writer focused (not reader focused). 2. The purpose is not clearly stated. 3. Information is poorly organized. 4. Headings are vague or missing altogether. 5. There is too much or not enough detail. 6. Technical terms/jargon are not explained. 7. The message is written in a complicated style. 8. The message is poorly laid out/presented. Orientation

6 Help Your Reader Use these eight tips to help your reader grasp your message: 1. Focus on what your reader needs to know – not what you want to say. 2. State the purpose of the procedure explicitly and early. 3. Identify the intended reader/user. 4. Include only the necessary/accurate information the reader needs to successfully complete the procedure. 5. Organize information so the procedure is easy to skim. 6. Reduce detours in your procedure. 7. Sequence steps logically/separately. 8. Write in a clear, concise, easy-to-read style. Orientation

7 Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing In this section, you will explore the first three steps to an easy-to- use system for planning, writing and editing your procedures. Step 3: Plan & Organize Content Step 2: Clarify Your Objective Return to main Table of Contents Step 1: Analyze Your Topic & Your Reader

8 Step 1: Analyze Your Topic & Your Reader When a procedure is poorly organized and information is scattered and disjointed, the reader wastes time taking too many detours or is unable to complete the task. Before writing a procedure, analyze your topic and your reader to ensure your procedure is user-focused. Ask yourself: 1. What do I need to know about the topic? 2. What do I need to know about the reader/user? Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing

9 Procedures are generally written for two groups or people: initiated and uninitiated readers. Lets compare the two groups. Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing Initiated ReadersUninitiated Readers Comfortable performing the job Merely use the set of written procedures as a memory aid that explains "how" to do the job or task Require few explanations and visuals to support the steps in the task Performing the job for first time Require written explanations around the equipment they need, the steps they must take, the reasons for the steps and the expected results Want helpful visuals supporting key ideas or tasks Since they have little to no training, they need you to write so that they are able to pick up the procedure and follow the instructions without help

10 Step 2: Clarify Your Objective Have a clear understanding of what you want to achieve in writing your procedure. First, identify your General Objective. Your General Objective as a procedure writer is to: INSTRUCT or TEACH a process Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing

11 Second, you must clarify your Specific Objective and write the Objective Sentence. Here is an example: Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing Example Specific Objective: I want my reader to be able to successfully recover lost data after his/her PDA crashes. Objective Sentence: This procedure explains how to recover lost data after a PDA crashes.

12 Step 3: Plan & Organize Content In this step, you will learn techniques to help you decide what to include in your procedure. You will gain tips for developing your ideas and structure your procedure. And, you will explore how to write the Opening (or Introduction), the Overview, and the Body of your procedure. Why writing a procedure is different... In grade school, you learned that every document has an Opening, a Body and a Close. Procedures are an exception to the rule...they only have two parts: an Opening and a Body. IWCC's Four Cs Procedure Writing Template on the next slide will give you additional guidance for writing procedures. Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing

13 IWCCs Four Cs Procedure Writing Template Opening: Body: Capture (Title) Clarify (Objective) - State purpose Connect (Overview) - Explain who the procedure is for - Explain why the user needs to follow it - Explain the tools and equipment needed - Explain what they will and will not find Convey (Instructions) - Describe how and when to do steps Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing

14 Use the Reader Questions Technique As an effective procedure writer, you need to focus on your readers needs. Rather than asking yourself, What do I want to tell the reader/user? give the reader the specific information he or she needs. Use the Reader Questions (RQs) Technique to determine what information to include in your procedure. Ask yourself: What does my reader need to know to be able to do / feel / know what I want them to do / feel / know? Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing

15 Brainstorm your RQs. Then, sort, group and sequence them in the order your reader wants the information. On the next slide, you will find an example of RQs that have been brainstormed and sorted into Instruction (I) and Overview (O) questions. Note: As you work through this process, keep your reader in mind. Initiated and uninitiated readers ask different questions for each step in a procedure. Initiated readers ask...Uninitiated readers ask... How do I do the task? Why am I doing this step? What will happen when I do this step? Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing

16 Example: Brainstormed & Sorted RQs OHow much will prep cost? IHow do I protect floors & fabric? OWhy should I tape anything? IHow do I repair wall dents? IHow much furniture must I remove? OWhat safety precautions should I take? IHow do I clean walls? IHow do I remove wallpaper? OHow much time will it take? OWhat tools & supplies do I need? Preparing to Paint a Room Instruction (I) | Overview (O) Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing

17 After brainstorming and sorting your RQs, you need to group your Overview questions into major and minor questions. Then sequence them in the order the reader wants the information. Next, you need to group your Instruction questions into major and minor questions; then sequence them. On the next two slides, you will find an example of the Overview and Instruction questions for Preparing to Paint a Room. You will see that the RQs are grouped into major and minor questions then sequenced for the reader. You will also notice that we have identified the overriding objective question for this procedure. Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing

18 Objective: This procedure explains how to prepare a room for painting. Overview: 1.Who is this procedure written for? Can I do this task alone? How can I find help? 2.Why do all this prep work? Why do I need to tape anything? 3.What safety precautions should I take? 4.How much time and cost is involved? 5.What tools and supplies do I need? Example: Grouped & Sequenced Major & Minor RQs Preparing to Paint a Room Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing Major RQs (Bold) | Minor RQs (Italics)

19 Instructions: 1.How do I get the room ready? How much furniture do I need to move? How do I protect remaining furniture? How do I protect the floors and fabrics? 2.How do I clean the room and remove the wallpaper? What do I need to clean? How do I clean walls? How do I remove wallpaper? 3.How do I tape and repair the room? What do I tape? How do I apply the tape? How do I repair the wall dents? Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing

20 High Impact Writing Return to main Table of Contents In this section, you will learn to write sentences that are clear and easy to understand. You will also learn techniques to help your reader find information easily. High Impact Style Packaging & Labeling Techniques (label sentences, bridging words/phrases, bullet points, headings, visuals, special formats) High Impact Sentence Techniques (picture nouns, active/linking verbs, sentence cores, voice)

21 Two Styles of Writing Only one of these two styles meets the needs of the business reader – High Impact. The characteristics of both low and high impact styles are compared below. Which style do you prefer? vague muddy bureaucratic difficult concise to-the-point clear easy Low Impact High Impact High Impact Writing

22 High Impact Style 1.High Impact Sentence Techniques 2.Packaging & Labeling Techniques Effective procedure writers write in a High Impact Style. To make your written messages understandable, use the High Impact Writing Strategies below: High Impact Writing

23 High Impact Sentence Techniques The first step to writing in a High Impact Style is to use High Impact Sentence Techniques. When you craft High Impact sentences, you write procedures that are clear and easy to understand. Lets look at four High Impact Sentence Techniques that will help you to write procedures using High Impact sentences. #1. Picture Nouns #2. Active/Linking Verbs #3. Sentence Cores #4. Appropriate Voice High Impact Writing

24 #1: Picture Nouns By using picture nouns in your writing, you will write sentences that are clear and easy for the reader to read. The next few slides will provide you with examples of helpful and less helpful nouns and pronouns. High Impact Writing

25 Picture Nouns Helpful Nouns management department procedure I, we, you equipment policy money computer he, she, they software High Impact picture nouns and pronouns create pictures in the mind of your reader. High Impact Writing

26 Vague Nouns Less Helpful Nouns involvement viability optimization development modification this, it aspect probability renewal illustration Low Impact nouns and pronouns force your reader to analyze an abstract concept or idea. High Impact Writing

27 Vague Pronouns Rather than:It has been noted... Try:We have noticed… I have seen… We reported… Rather than: There is only one reason why the policy will not be accepted. Try: Management will not accept the policy because… Rather than: The side effects are minimal. This means patients will not suffer. Try: Patients will not suffer because the side effects are minimal. Or: The side effects are minimal; therefore patients will not suffer. When you use a vague pronoun as the subject of your sentence, you completely confuse your reader. As well, vague pronouns can make you sound old-fashioned or pompous. High Impact Writing

28 Verb Nouns Rather than:The introduction of the speaker will be made by the Chairman. Try:The Chairman will introduce the speaker. Rather than: The utilization of the new financial reporting process is mandatory for everyone. Try: Everyone must use the new financial reporting process. Some nouns are really verbs masquerading as nouns. High Impact writers take care to replace the verb noun with a picture noun and use the verb noun as – guess what – a verb! The following examples show you how you can transform verb nouns back to the verbs they were derived from. High Impact Writing

29 Describer Nouns Rather than:The effectiveness of the testing was an area of doubt for the manager. Try:The manager doubted that the testing was effective. Rather than: The viability of the procedures timely completion is questionable. Try: We are not sure if the procedures completion date is viable. Some nouns are really adjectives masquerading as nouns. High Impact writers take care to replace a describer noun with a picture noun and use the describer noun as an adjective. The following examples show you how you can transform describer nouns back to the adjectives they were derived from. High Impact Writing

30 #2: Active/Linking Verbs Some verbs work harder than others; that is, they give the reader information in the natural order of: Actor » Action » Acted-Upon. By using active/linking verbs and the Actor » Action » Acted-Upon format in your writing, you will write sentences that will help your reader grasp the message easily and quickly. The next few slides provide you with examples of active/passive/linking verbs while introducing you to the Actor » Action » Acted-Upon format. High Impact Writing

31 Active Verbs Use active verbs when the subject or actor in the sentence is taking/going to take/or took action. Sentences with active verbs have High Impact because the actor comes before the verb. Actor Action Acted-Upon (Subject) (Active Verb)(Object) The manager is writing the procedure. (present tense) The controller will prepare the statements. (future tense) The doctor prescribed the drug. (past tense) High Impact Writing

32 Passive Verbs When you use passive verbs to show an action is being/will be/has been done to the subject of a sentence, you make the sentence more difficult to read. Sentences with passive verbs have less impact because they stray from the natural order of Actor » Action » Acted- Upon…and sometimes the Actor is completely absent. Acted-UponAction Actor (Subject)(Verb) The project is being carried out by the consultant. (present tense) The procedure will be completed by the manager. (future tense) The drug has been approved. (past tense) (Studies show that people read sentences with passive verbs 14-17% more slowly than they read sentences with active verbs.) High Impact Writing

33 Linking Verbs Use linking verbs in a sentence where no action is taking place. They are called linking verbs because they simply link the Actor (Subject) and the Acted-Upon (Completer). ActorAction Acted-Upon (Subject) (Linking Verb)(Completer) The procedureis long. Management seems to be satisfied. High Impact Writing

34 #3: Sentence Cores High Impact writers put the primary information or main idea in the sentence core. Then they use adjectives, adverbs and prepositional phrases to add the secondary-level information the reader needs to clearly understand the message. Once you have put the most important information in the core of your sentence, you can build on it. You will find an example on the next page. High Impact Writing

35 Adjectives, adverbs and prepositional phrases tell the reader more about the whole sentence. After three days, the auxiliary pump in the boiler is still running at full capacity. Adjectives, adverbs and prepositional phrases add secondary-level information that tells the reader more about the actor and the action. The auxiliary pump in the boiler is still running. Sentence core contains primary information only. The pump is running. Example: Building on the Core High Impact Writing

36 #4. Appropriate Voice The voice you choose to write in determines how you relate to your reader. The word you choose for the subject of your sentence controls the voice you create. VoiceSubjectProsCons PersonalI Creates connection between one human and another. Focuses on the writer rather than the reader. Organizationalwe Same as above.Focuses on the organization rather than the customer. Impersonalit Very specific and focused, good for discussing objects (ex. equipment, systems, hardware, etc.). Loses personal connection with reader, writers can fall into low impact writing with vague nouns. Youyou Used for persuasive writing/sales and to involve the reader (ex. Statement of Work, user guides, recommendations). Can seem informal. Imperative(implied you) Great for giving directions/ commands and sometimes Recommendations. Can sound dictatorial. High Impact Writing

37 Use Positive Tone Your writing can affect your credibility either positively or negatively. What you say…but more importantly…how you say it can affect the outcome of your procedure, customer relationships, and sometimes, your career. Positive tone is more than just being nice. It can: Help you get things done. Encourage people to buy your ideas. Establish a good relationship for the future. Enhance your personal credibility. Make you sound professional. High Impact Writing

38 You can choose to sound like this… We hope you will choose to renew your contract with our company. In order to process the renewal, we will need to hear from you by November 30. Our team has identified some serious problems. Nevertheless, we believe you will be able to quickly resolve them. Positive High Impact Writing

39 Or like this… If a response is not received by November 30, the assumption will be made that no contract renewal is desired. There are some obstacles standing in the way of a resolution to the problems identified. Negative tone leaves a bad taste. It can: Detract from your professional image. Make your reader angry or defensive. Lead to compliance…but rarely cooperation. Negative High Impact Writing

40 Or like this… We need to know by November 30, if you are renewing your contract. Our team has identified some serious problems and we need to remove some barriers to solve the problems. Neutral tone has no feeling, just facts. It can: Make you sound like a cold fish. Send a chilling message. Be interpreted as negative. Neutral High Impact Writing

41 Apply IWCCs P-Touch Technique You can project a positive, professional image in your writing by using IWCCs Personal Touch (P-Touch) Technique. P P lease be polite. T T alk person-to-person. O O ffer specifics. U U se reader-friendly language. C C ut out clichés and legal language. H H andle things constructively. High Impact Writing

42 Packaging & Labeling Techniques The second step to writing in a High Impact Style is to use these Packaging & Labeling Techniques. When you apply these techniques, you present information in a way that helps the reader grasp the key points quickly and easily, and you lower the possibility of miscommunication. #1. Label sentences #2. Bridging words & phrases #3. Bullet points (Point Form) #4. Active/descriptive headings #5. Visuals to support text #6. Typical formats High Impact Writing

43 #1. Label Sentences The human brain likes to receive information in chunks. By using Label Sentences, you will easily organize information into coherent paragraphs or packages of related information. Label sentences also help you guide a busy reader to key information as they skim through a long message or document. High Impact Writing

44 Packaging Information Think of your document as a series of packages of information; for example, these moving boxes: Each package begins with a label that tells the reader what is inside the package. Then, when you look inside the package you find out more (ex. cutlery or platters; kitchen or bar glasses; blender or microwave oven). You will find an example on the next two slides showing how one writer planned then wrote a paragraph using this technique. High Impact Writing

45 RQ: How will this type of system benefit my company? Label: By introducing our innovative software system, you will see immediate benefits in three areas. Supporting Detail: improved employee morale lower wage costs less absenteeism High Impact Writing Example: Label Sentence in Action

46 By introducing our innovative system, you will see immediate benefits in three areas. First, because the job will be easier, job stress will be reduced and employees will have improved morale. Second, your employees will be more productive and will take fewer sick days, so absenteeism will be reduced. Finally, with less absenteeism, you will see the cost of wages decrease as you will need fewer temporary employees. High Impact Writing Example: Finished Paragraph

47 Using Label Sentences for Instructions When writing instructions, use a label sentence and supporting information to introduce a new package or group of steps. High Impact Writing Your initiated reader needs little elaboration – a descriptive heading with or without a label sentence could be enough explanation at the beginning of a group of steps.

48 Your uninitiated reader, however, needs more detail. You may find that an active/descriptive heading, label and supporting paragraph are necessary at the beginning of each group to explain the why and what. For quick reimbursement following a business trip, employees need to complete the following three steps to submit their expenses: 1.Organize original receipts into related groups, scan and save as PDF or jpg files. 2.Complete an electronic expense form (remember to total all sections). 3. your completed form and scanned receipts to Example: Label sentence followed by steps High Impact Writing

49 THE GLASS BEING SHATTERED OR DESTROYED SHOULD BE RESERVED FOR SUCH OCCASIONS THAT THE DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF FIRE OR FIRE-LIKE EVENTS INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO SMOKE AND HEAT AND FOR YOUR SAFETY SHOULD BE ACCOMPLISHED BY USE OF ATTACHED HAMMER OR MALLET Example: Low Impact Instructions High Impact Writing

50 IN CASE OF FIRE, BREAK GLASS! Example: High Impact Instructions High Impact Writing

51 #2. Bridging Words & Phrases High Impact Writing When your writing sounds choppy, or when ideas are simply set down one after another with no apparent connection, your reader has to work harder to get the message. You can help your reader connect ideas and information by using bridging words and phrases. Bridging words and phrases help your writing flow cohesively for your reader. They add variety and build meaning; and, they connect one thought or idea to the next.

52 Connect IdeasGet SpecificPresent Results AlsoFor instanceTherefore In additionTo explainSo AndFor exampleConsequently Compare IdeasEmphasize IdeasShow Timing In comparisonIn additionFirst, Second, Third In contrastMoreoverBefore In the same wayFurthermoreThen Example: Bridging Words & Phrases High Impact Writing

53 #3. Bullet Points You can help your reader by using bullet points to: List things. Describe a series of ideas. Write instructions. Highlight important points. Describe short sequences/processes. Create variety on a page. Keep in mind that bullet points are not helpful to your reader when you list more than seven items, or when you are trying to persuade or build an argument. High Impact Writing

54 Tips for Effective Bullet Points When you decide to use bullet points, please use these five simple guidelines: 1. Begin each group of points with a descriptive label sentence or heading. 2. Cluster points into groups of seven or fewer. 3. Begin each point with the same kind of word (e.g. a verb or noun). 4. Use a number (1, 2, 3) or letter (a, b, c) if you want to show sequence or refer to a specific point later. 5. Use a symbol to differentiate each point in a list that does not have a specific sequence. High Impact Writing

55 #4. Active/Descriptive Headings Todays procedure reader is busy and often overloaded with information. Well-written headings are therefore essential. When you use active/descriptive headings, you: Help the reader find key information easily. Signal to the reader what information they can expect to find under each heading. Help the reader follow the structure of the document (major sections, sub-sections, sub- subsections). Express information clearly. You will find some tips to help you write active/descriptive headings on the next three slides. High Impact Writing

56 Heading Tip #1 Do your headings lack impact? Include an action verb to make your heading more descriptive. For example: Generic/StaticActive/Descriptive ObjectiveWhat We Will Achieve InstructionsFinding Help High Impact Writing

57 Heading Tip #2 Are you forced to use a template with generic/static heading? Add a subheading to make your heading more descriptive. For example: Generic/StaticSubheading OverviewThe procedure objective AssumptionsKey information you need to know High Impact Writing

58 Heading Tip #3 Do you find writing headings to be difficult? Try pulling key words from your readers questions. For example: Readers QuestionHeading How can I be sure that Why this Solution will Work your solution will work? How should I proceed?How You Should Proceed High Impact Writing

59 #5. Visuals to Support Text You may choose from a wide range of visuals – including charts, tables, graphs, drawings, photos, screen capture, PDF snapshots, and video – to support your procedure. However, be sure to plan your procedure content from your Reader Questions; then plan to add visual material, if appropriate, to support your content. Do not be tempted to design your visuals then build your content around them. Include visuals only if they will help your reader understand important information. High Impact Writing

60 Some tips for using visuals effectively: Keep visuals simple and clear. If complicated, add words to interpret for reader. Place visuals close to descriptive text. Describe relationship between visual and text. Use callouts, highlights or colour to draw readers attention to important information. Fill in forms; use lifelike size. Only use visuals if they will help the reader. High Impact Writing

61 Start/stop Decision point (yes/no) Activity Document Connect to another page or part of diagram High Impact Writing Some common flowchart symbols you may find helpful:

62 #6. Typical Formats Procedure writers have designed some specialized formats that help their readers grasp the important facts easily. Examine your procedure closely before deciding on a format. Ask yourself the following questions: Are your procedure steps long & detailed or short & simple? Are they full of complicated data or more general in nature? Are there different formats that would suit different steps? Matching your material to reader needs will help you determine the best format, or combination of formats to use. You will find a summary of different formats on the next slide. High Impact Writing

63 The table below gives you a quick summary of the different types of formats you can use. Type of FormatPurpose Narrative Outline List Playscript Flowchart Matrix Table FAQs Troubleshooting Paragraph style used primarily in procedure overviews to explain concepts. Point form style used to show steps at a glance. A group of related points that support a thought or action. Two-column style showing who is responsible for what. Diagram style using different symbols to illustrate procedure steps. A table that illustrates a process and its conditions. A narrative or table format used to address reader concerns and questions. Quick reference table that explains exceptions or breakdowns that may occur. High Impact Writing

64 Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing In this section, you will explore the last two steps to an easy-to- use system for planning, writing and editing your procedures. Step 5: Refine Your Procedure Return to main Table of Contents Step 4: Write Your Procedure

65 Step 4: Write Your Procedure You are now ready to answer your Reader Questions and write your procedure. Use your grouped and sequenced RQs as your guide (see Slides 18-19). Be sure to apply the Four Cs (below) and the High Impact Writing strategies (summarized on next slide).see Slides Opening: Body: Capture (Title) - Title your procedure Clarify (Objective) - State the purpose Connect (Overview) - Explain who the procedure is for - Explain why the user needs to follow it - Explain the tools and equipment needed - Explain what they will and will not find Convey (Instructions) - Describe how and when to do steps Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing

66 High Impact Sentence Techniques 1. Use the ACTOR » ACTION » ACTED UPON format. 2. Use picture nouns. 3. Use active or linking verbs. 4. Put the primary information in the core. 5. Use an appropriate voice. Packaging & Labeling Techniques 1. Make your point in each paragraph with a label sentence; then support it. 2. Use bridging words and phrases. 3. Use bullet points purposefully. 4. Use active/descriptive headings. 5. Use visuals to support text. 6. Use formats to clearly present information. Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing

67 Step 5: Refine Your Procedure The final step is to ensure your procedure is complete, accurate and error free. You will need to complete four levels of review. Level 1. VETTING Vet the procedure to ensure the steps are correct and following them results in success. Ask someone who is unfamiliar with the procedure to work through the document to test its readability, completeness and comprehension. If you find steps are missing, incomplete or difficult to understand, revisit the procedure and make appropriate changes. Level 2. EDITING Edit the procedure to ensure that the content is accurate and you have answered all of your Reader Questions in a High Impact writing style. Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing

68 Level 3. FORMATTING Format the procedure to ensure the reader can read and follow the information/instructions easily and perform the tasks safely and accurately. Review to ensure your procedure format is appropriate; it is easy-to-read and follow; and you have used appropriate visuals. Level 4. PROOFREADING Proofread the procedure. Look for: a. Errors and typos. b. Consistency of text standards. Good proofreading practices – as well as knowing what to look for – will increase your hit rate at spotting errors in your documents. Five Steps to Effective Procedure Writing

69 By applying the tips and techniques you have learned in this slideshow, you will be well on your way to writing procedures that: are useful, professional and inviting; and clearly define the standards, processes and desired results in your workplace. The quality of the procedures you write has a direct impact on the quality of your companys products or services.


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