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Chapter Six Improving Readability with Style and Design McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2014 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter Six Improving Readability with Style and Design McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2014 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter Six Improving Readability with Style and Design McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2014 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

2 6-2 Learning Objectives LO6.1 Describe and apply the following principles of writing style that improve ease of reading: completeness, conciseness, and natural processing LO6.2 Explain and use navigational design to improve ease of reading. LO6.3 Describe and apply the components of the reviewing stage, including a FAIR test, proofreading, and feedback.

3 6-3 Improving Ease of Reading with Completeness You can achieve completeness with three basic strategies: 1. providing all relevant information; 2. being accurate 3. being specific

4 6-4 Provide All Relevant Information  The key to providing all but only relevant information is to plan, write, and review your message strategically  Repeatedly asking yourself what information is necessary for the purpose of your message will help you accomplish this.

5 6-5 Most Important Elements of Writing Style and Design According to Employers Table 6.1

6 6-6 Be Accurate  Accuracy, like specificity, strongly impacts your readers’ perceptions of your credibility  Just one inaccurate statement can lead readers to dismiss your entire message and lower their trust in your future communications as well.

7 6-7 Being Accurate Table 6.2

8 6-8 Be Specific  The more specific you are, the more likely your readers are to have their questions answered  If you are not specific, your readers may become impatient and begin scanning and skimming for the information they want

9 6-9 Being Specific Table 6.3

10 6-10 Improving Ease of Reading with Conciseness  Conciseness implies omitting needless words so that readers can rapidly process your main ideas

11 6-11 Improving Ease of Reading with Conciseness Control paragraph length Use short sentences Avoid redundancy Avoid empty phrases Avoid wordy prepositional phrases

12 6-12 Control Paragraph Length  Long paragraphs can signal disorganization and even disrespect for the reader’s time  Typically, paragraphs should contain 40 to 80 words.  For routine messages, paragraphs as short as 20 to 30 words are common and appropriate.

13 6-13 Controlling Paragraph Length Table 6.4

14 6-14 Use Short Sentences in Most Cases  Short sentences allow your readers to comprehend your ideas more easily  For routine messages, aim for average sentence length of 15 or fewer words

15 6-15 Using Short Sentences Table 6.5

16 6-16 Comprehension Rate and Sentence Length Figure 6.2

17 6-17 Avoiding Redundancy Table 6.6

18 6-18 Avoiding Empty Phrases Table 6.7

19 6-19 Avoid Wordy Prepositional Phrases  Eliminating extra words allows you to get your ideas across as efficiently as possible.  You will often find that you can reduce word count by 30 to 40 percent simply by converting many of your prepositional phrases into single-word verbs.

20 6-20 Avoiding Wordy Prepositional Phrases Table 6.8

21 6-21 Improving Ease of Reading with Natural Style Use Action Verbs When Possible Use Active Voice Use Short and Familiar Words and Phrases Use Parallel Language Avoid Buzzwords and Figures of Speech Avoid It Is/There Are

22 6-22 Use Action Verbs When Possible  First, find nouns that you can convert to action verbs  Second, find forms of the verb to be (e.g., be verbs such as is, are, am) and convert them into action verbs

23 6-23 Using Action Verbs Table 6.9

24 6-24 Use Active Voice

25 6-25 Use Active Voice  The doer-action-object allows for faster processing because most people’s natural thinking occurs in this way  It also emphasizes the business orientation of action  Most important, it specifies the doer

26 6-26 Using Active Voice Appropriately Table 6.10

27 6-27 Using Passive Voice Appropriately Table 6.11

28 6-28 Use Short and Familiar Words and Phrases  Whenever possible, choose short, conversational, and familiar words  Using longer, less common ones slows processing and can distract from your message.

29 6-29 Use Parallel Language  Using parallel language means that you apply a consistent grammatical pattern across a sentence or paragraph.  Parallelism is most important when you use series or lists.

30 6-30 Using Parallel Language Table 6.13

31 6-31 Avoid Buzzwords and Figures of Speech  Don’t distract your readers with overused or out-of-place words or phrases.  Buzzwords  Workplace terms that become trite because of overuse  Can stir negative feelings among some readers

32 6-32 The Most Annoying Buzzwords Table 6.14

33 6-33 Avoid It Is/There Are  Most sentences that begin with it is or there are fail to provide a specific subject and generally contain more words than necessary  Readers naturally want to know precisely who or what the subject of a sentence is, particularly in business writing, where specificity is so important.

34 6-34 Avoiding It Is and There Is Table 6.16

35 6-35 Improving Ease of Reading with Navigational Design  Your primary goal for document design is making your message easy to navigate

36 6-36 Use Headings  In information-rich and complex messages, headings can help your readers identify key ideas and navigate the document to areas of interest.  As you create headings and subheadings, be consistent in font style and formatting throughout your document.

37 6-37 Using Highlight Key Words and Phrases  When you want to highlight ideas or phrases, consider using bold, italics, or underlining to draw and keep your readers’ attention  If you use too much special formatting, your main ideas will not stand out

38 6-38 Applying Formatting to Key Words and Phrases Table 6.18

39 6-39 Using Bulleted and Numbered Lists Table 6.19

40 6-40 Reviewing Your Message Conduct a FAIR Test Proofread Get Feedback


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