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Literary Periods, 1800-Present English 2301 20 February 2014 Jeff Lilburn English Literature Librarian Mount Allison University Libraries & Archives.

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Presentation on theme: "Literary Periods, 1800-Present English 2301 20 February 2014 Jeff Lilburn English Literature Librarian Mount Allison University Libraries & Archives."— Presentation transcript:

1 Literary Periods, 1800-Present English February 2014 Jeff Lilburn English Literature Librarian Mount Allison University Libraries & Archives

2 Todays Class Where to find appropriate secondary resources What is peer-review How to search library catalogues and article databases (to find books & articles) Search Strategy and Keyword Selection

3 Primary Sources A primary source provides first-hand information on the topic. The author or artist personally participated in the event under discussion, such as a science experiment, a humanitarian mission, or the creation of a work of art.

4 Secondary Sources Secondary sources present an argument, interpretation, conclusion, or summary based on information found in primary sources.

5 In Literary Studies Examples of primary sources?

6 In Literary Studies Examples of primary sources? …A novel, short story, poem or play

7 In Literary Studies Examples of primary sources? …A novel, short story, poem or play Examples of secondary sources?

8 In Literary Studies Examples of primary sources? …A novel, short story, poem, play Examples of secondary sources? Criticism and analysis of literary works, such as: …A book about the plays of David Mamet …A scholarly journal article about Hamlet …A book chapter about Virginia Woolfs novels _____ Source for previous slides (and where to find more information and examples): – Primary and Secondary Resources: A Research Guide,

9 What is a Scholarly Source? Keep in mind that your assignment asks you to annotate the sources you use Your annotations will need to include evidence of the scholarly authority of each source Read your assignment instructions carefully

10 What is a Scholarly Source? Usually written by experts in the field (look for: credentials, author affiliations) Usually peer-reviewed (critically assessed by other scholars and experts in the field prior to publication) Engages and builds on previous research on the same subject (see next bullet) Always cites all sources quoted or referenced in the book or paper (articles and books aimed at a non-academic audience dont normally do this)

11 What is a Scholarly Source? Generally published in a peer-reviewed journal (articles) or by a university press or publisher specializing in scholarly works (e.g.: Oxford University Press) Makes a contribution to the field (presents an original argument or interpretation)

12 What is Peer Review?

13 Scrutinizing Science: Peer Review. Understanding Science. University of California Museum of Paleontology. 4 October 2011.

14 Most Common Scholarly Secondary sources in Literary Studies? Books, such as a single-author book about the works of Margaret Atwood. Book chapters, such as essays published as chapters in edited collections (e.g. The Cambridge Companion to Margaret Atwood) Journal articles (articles published in scholarly, peer-reviewed journals)

15 Where to find Secondary Sources Mount A Library Catalogue – Use to find books, ebooks, and book chapters (also movies, music, government publications, and more) Library Databases (such as the MLA Database, JSTOR, Project Muse, ProQuest) – Use to find articles in scholarly journals (and, in some cases, in magazines and newspapers; in some cases books & book chapters)

16 The MtA Library Catalogue A catalogue of whats available at our library. Use to find books, ebooks, movies, journals, magazines, newspapers and more… But not articles. More on this later.

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18 Known-item Searching When you already know the title or author name of a book, you can search by TITLE or by AUTHOR. This type of search is called a Starts With, or Browse search (it permits you to browse an alphabetical list of titles, authors, etc.) Examples: – Title: Mill on the Floss(omit initial articles) – Author: Eliot, George (last name first)

19 Keyword Searching: Finding Books About a Topic or Author Search for books on a topic or for books *about* an author or his/her works Search for a word, words or a phrase anywhere in the library catalogue record (eg: words from the author, title, subject, and publisher fields, etc.). Combine words and phrases using AND, OR, NOT Examples: eliot and waste land and modernism atwood and (gender or women or men)

20 Example (keyword): richler and biography Example (Title): Jane Eyre

21 Example (keyword): richler and biography Example (Title): Jane Eyre

22 Example (keyword): richler and biography Example (Title): Northanger Abbey

23 Example (keyword): richler and biography Example (Title): Northanger Abbey Call Number Click for More Detail Title, Author, Publisher, Year of publication

24 Example (keyword): richler and biography Example (Title): Northanger Abbey Call Number More Detail Title, Author, Publisher, Year of publication Subject Headings Some records (but not this one) include a Contents note that provides the Table of Contents (chapter titles). This is more common for collections of essays (edited anthologies) than it is for single-author books such as this one.

25 Example (keyword): richler and biography Example (Title): Northanger Abbey Known-item search: Author

26 Example (keyword): richler and biography Example (Title): Northanger Abbey

27 Example (keyword): richler and biography Example (Title): Northanger Abbey

28 Searching by Subject Subject searches use Library of Congress SUBJECT HEADINGS. These are standardized headings assigned to a book when it is published to describe what the book is about. A single book may have just one or, more likely, several different Subject Headings. Author names can be used as subjects You can search by Subject using an authors name to find books about that author.

29 Subject Headings: CLICK!

30 Subject Headings: CLICK!

31 Subject Headings: CLICK!

32 Subject Headings: CLICK!

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34 Finding Articles

35 Where to search for Journal Articles Articles are NOT indexed in the Library Catalogue. So: you cannot use the catalogue to find articles. Articles are indexed in various library databases, such as: The MLA Database Project Muse, JSTOR, ProQuest… And other databases listed here: Indexes and Databases: English Literature

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38 MLA Database Index to scholarly research in several languages covering topics in language, literature, linguistics, folklore and film. Also indexes (selectively) books and essays published in edited collections (chapters). Not a full-text database, but will help you identify articles (and books, chapters…) that we may have in print or in another database (such as JSTOR, Project Muse).

39 MLA Database In case you were wondering… Yes, the MLA in the name of this database is the same as that in the MLA Handbook, and MLA citation style (Modern Language Association). No, the MLA Database does not use MLA Style. You will have to supply the Style.

40 atwood and oryx and crake MLA Database Main Search page

41 atwood and oryx and crake MLA Main Search page

42 atwood and oryx and crake MLA Main Search page Take time to review and assess your search results to find the items that are most relevant to you.

43 atwood and oryx and crake MLA Main Search page These Subject Terms help describe what the article is about and they are clickable, like tags.

44 atwood and oryx and crake MLA Main Search page How to find out if this article is available at the Library?

45 atwood and oryx and crake MLA Main Search page

46 atwood and oryx and crake MLA Main Search page

47 atwood and oryx and crake MLA Main Search page Where to look to find out if the journal is available in digital format Description of the volumes we have in print format. The Library does not have print issues from Journal Title

48 atwood and oryx and crake MLA Main Search page Click!

49 atwood and oryx and crake MLA Main Search page

50 atwood and oryx and crake MLA Main Search page

51 atwood and oryx and crake MLA Main Search page

52 RECAP: Finding Articles Once You Have a Citation (but dont yet have the full text) Use the Library Catalogue and/or Journal Finder to search for the title of the journal (not title of the article). Sample citation: Stewart, Alan. "Shakespeare And The Carriers." Shakespeare Quarterly 58.4 (2007):

53 RECAP: Finding Articles Once You Have a Citation (but dont yet have the full text) Use the Library Catalogue and/or Journal Finder to search for the title of the journal (not title of the article). Sample citation: Stewart, Alan. "Shakespeare And The Carriers." Shakespeare Quarterly 58.4 (2007):

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55 This journal is available in four library databases. Note that the years available vary from one database to another. Mount A. Libraries Journal Finder

56 This journal is available in four library databases. Note that the years available vary from one database to another. Issues for 2007 (vol 58)

57 This journal is available in four library databases. Note that the years available vary from one database to another.

58 Interlibrary Loan When the book or article you need isnt available… You can request them using the librarys interlibrary loan service.

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60 Other Databases JSTOR, Project Muse, Wiley Online, Oxford Journals Online, ProQuest, Taylor & Francis and more – All of these are searchable and include full-text access to scholarly articles

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62 JSTOR Advanced Search Page

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64 Can limit to one or several of the 328 individual journals in Language & Literature

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68 Keyword Selection & Search Strategy When starting a search: – Identify the key words that best describe your topic. – Then, try to think of related words (synonyms, broader or more specific terms, etc.) – Try to account for variations in spelling and language (e.g. theatre/theater, catalog/catalogue)

69 Keyword Selection Sample essay topic: Discuss the depiction of the poor in the works of American playwrights. What are the relevant keywords?

70 Keyword Selection Sample essay topic: Discuss the depiction of the poor in the works of American playwrights. What are the relevant keywords?

71 Keyword Selection Sample essay topic: Discuss the depiction of the poor in the works of American playwrights. However… Keyword search: poor and american and playwrights = 0 items !

72 Keyword Selection What to do… Try using synonyms, related words (broader or more specific), variant spellings (theatre, theater), etc. In other words: try to account for the various ways different authors may express the same or similar ideas or topics.

73 Keyword Selection Our keywords: Poor: American: Playwrights: Suggest synonyms, related words, etc.

74 Keyword Selection Our original keyword search: poor and american and playwrights = 0 items Using a few synonyms and related words: (poor or poverty or class) and (america$ or united states) and (play$ or drama or theatre or theater) = 55 items!

75 Keyword selection matters. Search strategy matters. A few tips: Dont rely on just one or two searches The first words used to describe a topic are probably not the only words you could use to search for information on that topic Take time to think about other ways to search for information on your topic (to find items that were not retrieved the first time) The sources you find first or most easily may or may not be the best sources for your topic

76 Keyword Search Tip! Truncation Symbol $ in the Library Catalogue * in most other library databases Example: Canad $ will find: Canada, Canadian, Canadians, Canadiana…

77 Annotated Bibliographies Place your annotation immediately after the citation – do not begin on a new line or new paragraph. Formatting Guidelines: see MLA Handbook section and For more examples, see the Concordia Libraries How to Prepare an Annotated Bibliography guideHow to Prepare an Annotated Bibliography

78 Annotated Bibliographies: MLA Handbook An annotated bibliography, also called Annotated List of Works Cited, contains descriptive or evaluative comments on the sources. Example: Harbord, Janet. The Evolution of Film: Rethinking Film Studies. Cambridge: Polity, Print. A synthesis of classic film theory and an examination of the contemporary situation of film studies that draws on recent scholarship in philosophy, anthropology, and media studies.

79 How to Get Help Ask me: Research Help Desk – In Person: Mon.-Thurs. 9-5, 6:30-10; Fri. 10:30- 4:30; Sun. 1:00-4:30 – – Live Chat: Chat link on the Libraries home page – Phone: Look for the Ask a Librarian link on the Librarys home pageAsk a Librarian

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82 Examples of Primary Sources: Original research (results of an experiment, an archeological dig) Government Records (Parliamentary Proceedings, Bills, Acts) Personal works (diaries, letters) Works of Art (paintings, sculptures, photographs)

83 Examples of Secondary Sources: A biography A book review Commentary, criticism or analysis (of a work of music or a work of art) Histories

84 Academic Integrity: Using Information Ethically Know how to cite your sources – MLA Citation Style MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 7 th edition (multiple copies available at LB 2369.G in the librarys reference collection) MLA Quick Guides available on the Library websites (click on How-to and Help Guides) – Other commonly used styles include APA and Chicago

85 Academic Integrity: Using Information Ethically Why cite?

86 Academic Integrity: Using Information Ethically Why cite? – To give credit where credit is due (i.e. acknowledge the contributions of others) – To permit your reader to find the sources you used – To provide evidence that you have consulted and engaged with relevant scholarship – To ensure that your reader can distinguish your ideas from those of others

87 Plagiarism Plagiarism is the act of taking credit for someone elses work. Do you like my painting? I painted it, really I did! da Vinci, Leonardo. Mona Lisa Musée du Louvre, Paris.

88 Avoiding Plagiarism The basic idea is to give credit where credit is due. This is done by providing a citation whenever you are using someone elses words, or paraphrasing a portion of their ideas. When examining life, one could say that all the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players. Plagiarism As Shakespeare said, all the worlds a stage, and all the men and women merely players. (AYL ) Not Plagiarism

89 Using Web Sources Open Access Journals – Google Scholar, Directory of Open Access Journals, Open Access Collections page How to determine if the information you found from a website is reputable – Consider things like: Who is the author? A scholar, expert, dont know? Who is responsible for the site? A university? Are any sources cited? Are they scholarly? Is the information current? Is there enough information available for you to write a proper citation? If no, why not?

90 How to Evaluate Search Results Do the resources you have found fit your requirements? Why do you want to use this information? Is there enough bibliographical information on the page to form a proper citation? Are factual claims backed up with evidence and supporting references? Do other sites and sources seem to say the same thing or is there dissention? Are the arguments sound? Obvious bias? Is it out of date? For more info: See the Evaluating Web Sources Guide

91 milton and paradise lost gender or women or men or masculinity

92 milton and paradise lost gender or women or men or masculinity Chapter Title Book Title

93 milton and paradise lost gender or women or men or masculinity Chapter Title Book Title

94 milton and paradise lost gender or women or men or masculinity Chapter Title Book Title Title would appear here… if we had it. We dont have this book in our Collection, but you can still get it by submitting an interlibrary loan Request.

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