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Washington State Dairy Council The Nutrition Education People.

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1 Washington State Dairy Council The Nutrition Education People

2 Start with the Facts Concerns about childhood obesity continue to grow It is critical that we not overlook the fact that most Americans are also undernourished Most children and adolescents are not getting the recommended amounts of key vitamins, minerals and nutrients needed for growth and development

3 Nutrients Milk provides 9 essential nutrients Nearly 90 % of adolescents do not meet USDA recommendations from the milk group 1 cup = 35% of calcium recommended for 4-8 year olds 1 cup = 23% of calcium recommended for those 8-18 United States Dept. of Health and Human Services, United States Dept. of Agriculture, and United States. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, 2005

4 The Calcium Gap On average, Americans are getting only half the recommended three daily servings of dairy. Who’s not meeting current calcium recommendations? 30% of 4-8 year olds 90% of teenage girls 70% of teenage boys 90 % of women United States Dept. of Health and Human Services, United States Dept. of Agriculture, and United States. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, 2010

5 Consumption

6 What are the effects? Boys are 32% and girls 56% more likely to experience bone fractures than children were 30 years ago. Childhood overweight has increased steadily and research shows fractures are reported more often by overweight than non- overweight children. These factors increase the risk of repeat injury, which can impede growth and bone mass accrual. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2003

7 Risk of Chronic Disease Calcium and other nutrients available in dairy products are critical for more than just bone health Dairy foods, when part of a balanced diet, may help reduce chronic disease risk of: Hypertension Osteoporosis and Osteopenia Obesity Colon cancer Kidney stones

8 Spotlight on Flavored Milk Flavored milk contains the same nine essential nutrients as white milk The American Dietetic Association states that “by increasing the palatability of nutrient-dense foods/beverages, sweeteners can promote diet healthfulness.” American Dietetic Association. J Am Diet Assoc. 104: 255, 2004

9 Flavored Milk in Schools 66 % of the milk chosen at school is flavored; most of which is low fat or fat free 90% of milk offered at school is low fat or fat free Kids prefer low-fat chocolate milk ENVIRON International Corporation. School Milk: Fat Content Has Declined Dramatically since the Early 1990s United States Dept. of Health and Human Services, United States Dept. of Agriculture, and United States. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, 2010

10 Flavored Milk A serving of low-fat white or flavored milk is 8 oz. Flavored milk contains both natural and added sugars Most of the sugar in milk is lactose, which is naturally present in milk The main difference between flavored and unflavored milk is the added sugar which adds approximately 30 kcal/8 oz.

11 What does 30 extra calories mean? 1 lb is equal to 3,500 calories If a child chooses flavored milk instead of white milk 117 days out of the school year there is a one pound difference Flavored milk has relatively few calories for the number of nutrients it provides Flavored milk should not be recommended for all meals

12 30 calorie equivalents ¼ Tbsp olive oil 1 kiwifruit 3 strawberries 1 chocolate kiss 2 crackers Do these foods provide 9 essential nutrients?

13 New Study – Milk PEP Reveals negative nutritional impact of removing chocolate milk from schools Purpose: quantify the impact on milk consumption and nutrient intake from changing the availability of flavored milk in schools. Milk Processors Education Program Study of Flavored Milk Elimination, 2010

14 New Study – Procedure Measure actual consumption, the quantity of milk used needed to be adjusted by the amount of milk discarded at the end of the meal This study included milk waste measurement under varying test and control conditions

15 Waste Management Protocol Sample Schools 58 Schools From 7 districts completed the waste measurement protocol Averaging 12 days per school Yielding nearly 700 measurement days Control Schools 18 Schools no change in flavor availability occurred, also followed the waste measurement protocol 211 measurement days

16 Executive Summary Elementary student milk consumption dropped an average of 35% when flavors were not offered On average, students’ actual consumption fell to less than 4 ounces per day (per milk drinker) when only white milk was offered

17 Replacing the Nutrients

18 Executive Summary: Nutrient Replacement The team concluded that if a school eliminates flavored milk, they should re-plan the entire menu pattern to assure it delivers the essential nutrients that are lost due to reduced milk consumption Minor changes or single food supplementation of the core menu offering does not deliver the required nutrition Costs an incremental $2,200-$4,600 annually per 100 students.

19 For More Information This study and other resources to support it can be found at

20 The Dairy Industry Recognizes the need to reduce the sugar in flavored milks Dollars are going towards research for reformulation of flavored milk to reduce the amount of sugar Dairy Processors in the Northwest are ahead of the curve with lower grams of added sugar in school milk than other parts of the country

21 Medical Professionals Weigh In The American Dietetic Association states that “by increasing the palatability of nutrient dense foods/beverages, sweeteners can promote diet healthfulness.” The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans “A few examples of nutrient-dense foods containing some solid fats or added sugars include whole-grain breakfast cereals that contain small amounts of added sugars, cuts of meat that are marbled with fat, poultry baked with skin on, vegetables topped with butter or stick margarine, fruit sprinkled with sugar, and fat-free chocolate milk.” American Dietetic Association. J Am Diet Assoc. 104: 255, 2004 U.S. Department of Health Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. Dietary guidelines for Americans, 2010Washington, DC: US Gov. Printing Office, 2010

22 Other Resources For more information go to and click on Dairy and Milk Free Handouts Activities Current Studies Links to other websites with scientifically reviewed information

23 Washington State Dairy Council


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