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Unit 1 exam: Exploring modern texts Section B: Exploring cultures PRACTICE QUESTIONS You are advised to spend 45 minutes on questions in this section.

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Presentation on theme: "Unit 1 exam: Exploring modern texts Section B: Exploring cultures PRACTICE QUESTIONS You are advised to spend 45 minutes on questions in this section."— Presentation transcript:

1 Unit 1 exam: Exploring modern texts Section B: Exploring cultures PRACTICE QUESTIONS You are advised to spend 45 minutes on questions in this section.

2 Up here is the name of the text from Section B – check that it is the one that you have studied! Foundation Higher To Kill a Mockingbird Of Mice and Men Possible question Past question Up in the top right corner is whether the question is from a Higher or Foundation paper – make sure you practice with questions from the paper you are entered for. Down here tells you whether the question comes from a past paper or whether it is a speculative question that COULD come up in your exam.

3 Read the passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). The old man was reassured. He had drawn a derogatory statement from George. He felt safe now, and he spoke more confidently. ‘Wait’ll you see Curley’s wife.’ George cut the cards again and put out a solitaire lay, slowly and deliberately. ‘Purty?’ he asked casually. ‘Yeah. Purty... but ––’ George studied his cards. ‘But what?’ ‘Well – she got the eye.’ ‘Yeah? Married two weeks and got the eye? Maybe that’s why Curley’s pants is full of ants.’ ‘I seen her give Slim the eye. Slim’s a jerkline skinner. Hell of a nice fella. Slim don’t need to wear no high-heeled boots on a grain team. I seen her give Slim the eye. Curley never seen it. An’ I seen her give Carlson the eye.’ George pretended a lack of interest. ‘Looks like we was gonna have fun.’ The swamper stood up from his box. ‘Know what I think?’ George did not answer. ‘Well, I think Curley’s married... a tart.’ ‘He ain’t the first,’ said George. ‘There’s plenty done that.’ The old man moved toward the door, and his ancient dog lifted his head and peered about, and then got painfully to his feet to follow. ‘I gotta be settin’ out the wash basins for the guys. The teams’ll be in before long. You guys gonna buck barley?’ ‘Yeah.’ ‘You won’t tell Curley nothing I said?’ ‘Hell no.’ ‘Well, you look her over, mister. You see if she ain’t a tart.’ He stepped out the door into the brilliant sunshine. Part (a) (a) How does the writer use details in this passage to present Candy? and then Part (b) (b) How do other characters treat Candy in the novel and what does this show you about the society in which he lives? In Part (b) write about: what the other characters say and do to Candy what society was like at this time. Foundation Past question Of Mice and Men

4 Read the passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). ‘I don’t want no fights,’ said Lennie. He got up from his bunk and sat down at the table, across from George. Almost automatically George shuffl ed the cards and laid out his solitaire hand. He used a deliberate, thoughtful, slowness. Lennie reached for a face card and studied it, then turned it upside down and studied it. ‘Both ends the same,’ he said, ‘George, why is it both end’s the same?’ ‘I don’t know,’ said George. ‘That’s jus’ the way they make ’em. What was Slim doin’ in the barn when you seen him?’ ‘Slim?’ ‘Sure. You seen him in the barn, an’ he tol’ you not to pet the pups so much.’ ‘Oh yeah. He had a can a’tar an’ a paint brush. I don’t know what for.’ ‘You sure that girl didn’t come in like she come in here today?’ ‘No. She never come.’ George sighed. ‘You give me a good whore house every time,’ he said. ‘A guy can go in an’ get drunk and get ever’thing outta his system all at once, an’ no messes. And he knows how much it’s gonna set him back. These here jail baits is just set on the trigger of the hoosegow.’ Lennie followed his words admiringly, and moved his lips a little to keep up. George continued, ‘You remember Andy Cushman, Lennie? Went to grammar school?’ ‘The one that his old lady used to make hot cakes for the kids?’ Lennie asked. ‘Yeah. That’s the one. You can remember anything if there’s anything to eat in it.’ George looked carefully at the solitaire hand. He put an ace up on his scoring rack and piled a two, three and four of diamonds on it. ‘Andy’s in San Quentin right now on account of a tart,’ said George. Lennie drummed on the table with his fi ngers. ‘George?’ ‘Huh?’ ‘George, how long’s it gonna be till we get that little place an’ live on the fatta the lan’ – an’ rabbits?’ Part (a) How does the writer use details in this passage to show the relationship between George and Lennie? and then Part (b) What do you learn from the novel about the lives of the ranch workers at this time and how are George and Lennie different? In part (b) write about: what the lives of the ranch workers were like at this time the ways the lives of George and Lennie are different to the other ranch workers. Foundation Past question Of Mice and Men

5 Read the following passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). Both men glanced up, for the rectangle of sunshine in the doorway was cut off. A girl was standing there looking in. She had full, rouged lips and wide-spaced eyes, heavily made up. Her fingernails were red. Her hair hung in little rolled clusters, like sausages. She wore a cotton house dress and red mules, on the insteps of which were little bouquets of red ostrich feathers. ‘I’m lookin’ for Curley,’ she said. Her voice had a nasal, brittle quality. George looked away from her and then back. ‘He was in here a minute ago, but he went.’ ‘Oh!’ She put her hands behind her back and leaned against the door frame so that her body was thrown forward. ‘You’re the new fellas that just come, ain’t ya?’ ‘Yeah.’ Lennie’s eyes moved down over her body, and though she did not seem to be looking at Lennie she bridled a little. She looked at her fingernails. ‘Sometimes Curley’s in here’, she explained. George said brusquely, ‘Well he ain’t now.’ ‘If he ain’t, I guess I better look some place else,’ she said playfully. Lennie watched her, fascinated. George said, ‘If I see him, I’ll pass the word you was looking for him.’ She smiled archly and twitched her body. ‘Nobody can’t blame a person for lookin’,’ she said. There were footsteps behind her, going by. She turned her head. ‘Hi, Slim,’ she said. Part (a) What do you learn about Curley’s wife from the details in this passage? and then Part (b) How do other characters treat Curley’s wife in the novel? What does this tell you about attitudes towards women in the society in which she lives? In part (b) write about: what the other characters say and do to Curley’s wife the methods Steinbeck uses to show attitudes towards women. Foundation Past question Of Mice and Men

6 Read the following passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). A tall man stood in the doorway. He held a crushed Stetson hat under his arm while he combed his long, black, damp hair straight back. Like the others he wore blue jeans and a short denim jacket. When he had fi nished combing his hair he moved into the room, and he moved with a majesty only achieved by royalty and master craftsmen. He was a jerkline skinner, the prince of the ranch, capable of driving ten, sixteen, even twenty mules with a single line to the leaders. He was capable of killing a fl y on the wheeler’s butt with a bull whip without touching the mule. There was a gravity in his manner and a quiet so profound that all talk stopped when he spoke. His authority was so great that his word was taken on any subject, be it politics or love. This was Slim, the jerkline skinner. His hatchet face was ageless. He might have been thirty-fi ve or fi fty. His ear heard more than was said to him, and his slow speech had overtones not of thought, but of understanding beyond thought. His hands, large and lean, were as delicate in their action as those of a temple dancer. He smoothed out his crushed hat, creased it in the middle and put it on. He looked kindly at the two in the bunk house. Part (a) In this passage, what methods does Steinbeck use to present Slim? Refer closely to the passage in your answer. and then Part (b) In the novel how does Steinbeck show what life was like for men in the society in which the novel is set? In Part (b) you should write about: what the men say and do details of what the male characaters’ lives are like the methods Steinbeck uses to present what life was like for men. Foundation Past question Of Mice and Men

7 Read the following passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). Crooks, the negro stable buck, had his bunk in the harness room; a little shed that leaned off the wall of the barn. On one side of the little room there was a square four- paned window, and on the other, a narrow plank door leading into the barn. Crooks' bunk was a long box filled with straw, on which his blankets were flung. On the wall by the window there were pegs on which hung broken harness in process of being mended; strips of new leather; and under the window itself a little bench for leather- working tools, curved knives and needles and balls of linen thread, and a small hand riveter. On pegs were also pieces of harness, a split collar with the horsehair stuffing sticking out, a broken hame, and a trace chain with its leather' covering split. Crooks had his apple box over his bunk, and in it a range of medicine bottles, both for himself and for the horses. There were cans of saddle soap and a drippy can of tar with its paint brush sticking over the edge. And scattered about the floor were a number of personal possessions; for, being alone, Crooks could leave his things about, and being a stable buck. and a cripple, he was more permanent than the other men, and he had accumulated more possessions than he could carry on his back. Crooks possessed several pairs of shoes, a pair of rubber boots, a big alarm clock and a single-barreled shotgun. And he had books, too; a tattered dictionary and a mauled copy of the California civil code for 1905. There were battered magazines and a few dirty books on a special shelf over his bunk. A pair of large gold- rimmed spectacles hung from a nail on the wall above his bed. This room was swept and fairly neat, for Crooks was a proud, aloof man. He kept his distance and demanded that other people keep theirs. His body was bent over to the left by his crooked spine, and his eyes lay deep in his head, and because of their depth seemed to glitter with intensity. His lean face was lined with deep black wrinkles, and he had thin, pain-tightened lips which were lighter than his face. Part (a) In this passage, what methods does Steinbeck use to present Crooks? Refer closely to the passage in your answer. and then Part (b) How do other characters treat Crooks in the novel? What does this tell you about attitudes towards black people in the society in which he lives? In part (b) write about: what the other characters say and do to Crooks the methods Steinbeck uses to show attitudes towards black people. Foundation Possible question Of Mice and Men

8 Read the following passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). At that moment a young man came into the bunkhouse; a thin young man with a brown face, with brown eyes and a head of tightly curled hair. He wore a work glove on his left hand, and like the boss, he wore high-heeled boots. ‘Seen my old man?’ he asked. The swamper said: ‘He was here jus’ a minute ago, Curley. Went over to the cook- house, I think.’ ‘I’ll try to catch him,’ said Curley. His eyes passed over the new men and he stopped. He glanced coldly at George and then at Lennie. His arms gradually bent at the elbows and his hands closed into fists. He stiffened and went into a slight crouch. His glance was at once calculating and pugnacious. Lennie squirmed under the look and shifted his feet nervously. Curley stepped gingerly close to him. ‘You the new guys the old man was waitin’ for?’ ‘We just come in,’ said George. ‘Let the big guy talk.’ Lennie twisted with embarrassment. George said: ‘S’pose he don’t want to talk?’ Curley lashed his body around. ‘By Christ, he’s gotta talk when he’s spoke to. What the hell are you gettin’ into it for?’ ‘We travel together,’ said George coldly. ‘Oh, so it’s that way.’ George was tense and motionless. ‘Yeah, it’s that way.’ Lennie was looking helplessly to George for instruction. ‘An’ you won’t let the big guy talk, is that it?’ ‘He can talk if he want to tell you anything.’ He nodded slightly to Lennie. ‘We jus’ come in,’ said Lennie softly. Curley stared levelly at him. ‘Well, nex’ time you answer when you’re spoke to.’ He turned towards the door and walked out, and his elbows were still bent out a little. Part (a) In this passage, what methods does Steinbeck use to present Curley? Refer closely to the passage in your answer. and then Part (b) How do other characters react to Curley in the novel? What does this tell you about the society in which the novel is set? In part (b) write about: what the other characters say to and about Curley how the other characters react to Curley the methods Steinbeck uses to present what life was like for men. Foundation Possible question Of Mice and Men

9 Read the following passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). Curley stepped over to Lennie like a terrier. ‘What the hell you laughin’ at?’ Lennie looked blankly at him. ‘Huh?’ Then Curley’s rage exploded. ‘Come on, ya big bastard. Get up on your feet. No big son-of-a-bitch is gonna laugh at me. I’ll show you who’s yella.’ Lennie looked helplessly at George, and then he got up and tried to retreat. Curley was balanced and poised. He slashed at Lennie with his left, and then smashed down his nose with a right. Lennie gave a cry of terror. Blood welled from his nose. ‘George,’ he cried. ‘Make ‘um let me alone, George.’ He backed until he was against the wall, and Curley followed, slugging him in the face. Lennie’s hands remained at his sides; he was too frightened to defend himself. George was on his feet yelling, ‘Get him, Lennie. Don’t let him do it.’ Lennie covered his face with his huge paws and bleated with terror. He cried, ‘Make ‘um stop, George.’ Then Curley attacked his stomach and cut off his wind. Slim jumped up. ‘The dirty little rat,’ he cried, ‘I’ll get ‘um myself.’ George put out his hand and grabbed Slim. ‘Wait a minute,’ he shouted. He cupped his hands around his mouth and yelled, ‘Get ‘im, Lennie!’ Lennie took his hands away from his face and looked about for George, and Curley slashed at his eyes. The big face was covered with blood. George yelled again, ‘I said get him.’ Curley’s fist was swinging when Lennie reached for it. The next minute Curley was flopping like a fish on a line, and his closed fist was lost in Lennie’s big hand. George ran down the room. ‘Leggo of him, Lennie. Let go.’ But Lennie watched in terror the flopping little man whom he held. Blood ran down Lennie’s face, one of his eyes was cut and closed. George slapped him on the face again and again, and still Lennie held on to the closed fist. Curley was white and shrunken by now, and his struggling had become weak. He stood crying, his fist lost in Lennie’s paw. Part (a) How does the writer use details in this passage to present the relationship between Curley and Lennie? and then Part (b) How is the theme of violence presented in the novel? What does this tell you about violence in the society in which the novel is set? In part (b) write about: how violence is shown in other parts of the novel what the other characters’ attitudes to violence are in the novel the methods Steinbeck uses to present violence. Foundation Possible question Of Mice and Men

10 Read the following passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). The boss stepped into the room with the short, quick steps of a fat-legged man. "I wrote Murray and Ready I wanted two men this morning. You got your work slips?" George reached into his pocket and produced the slips and handed them to the boss. "It wasn't Murray and Ready's fault. Says right here on the slip that you was to be here for work this morning." George looked down at his feet. "Bus driver give us a bum steer," he said. "We hadda walk ten miles. Says we was here when we wasn't. We couldn't get no rides in the morning." The boss squinted his eyes. "Well, I had to send out the grain teams short two buckers. Won't do any good to go out now till after dinner." He pulled his time book out of his pocket and opened it where a pencil was stuck between the leaves. George scowled meaningfully at Lennie, and Lennie nodded to show that he understood. The boss licked his pencil. "What's your name?" "George Milton." "And what's yours?" George said, "His name's Lennie Small." The names were entered in the book. "Le's see, this is the twentieth, noon the twentieth." He closed the book. "Where you boys been working?" "Up around Weed," said George. "You, too?" to Lennie. "Yeah, him too," said George. The boss pointed a playful finger at Lennie. "He ain't much of a talker, is he?" "No, he ain't, but he's sure a hell of a good worker. Strong as a bull." Lennie smiled to himself. "Strong as a bull," he repeated. George scowled at him, and Lennie dropped his head in shame at having forgotten. The boss said suddenly, "Listen, Small!" Lennie raised his head. "What can you do?" In a panic, Lennie looked at George for help. "He can do anything you tell him," said George. "He's a good skinner. He can rassel grain bags, drive a cultivator. He can do anything. Just give him a try." The boss turned on George. "Then why don't you let him answer? What you trying to put over?" George broke in loudly, "Oh! I ain't saying he's bright. He ain't. But I say he's a God damn good worker. He can put up a four hundred pound bale." The boss deliberately put the little book in his pocket. He hooked his thumbs in his belt and squinted one eye nearly closed. "Say- what you sellin'?" "Huh?" "I said what stake you got in this guy? You takin' his pay away from him?" "No, 'course I ain't. Why ya think I'm sellin' him out?" "Well, I never seen one guy take so much trouble for another guy. I just like to know what your interest is." Part (a) In this passage, what methods does Steinbeck use to present the Boss’ attitude to relationships? Refer closely to the passage in your answer. and then Part (b) What are the other characters’ attitudes towards relationships in the novel? What does this tell you relationships in the society in which he lives? In part (b) write about: how relationships are shown in other parts of the novel what the other characters’ attitudes to relationships are in the novel the methods Steinbeck uses to present relationships. Foundation Possible question Of Mice and Men

11 Read the passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). The old man was reassured. He had drawn a derogatory statement from George. He felt safe now, and he spoke more confidently. ‘Wait’ll you see Curley’s wife.’ George cut the cards again and put out a solitaire lay, slowly and deliberately. ‘Purty?’ he asked casually. ‘Yeah. Purty... but ––’ George studied his cards. ‘But what?’ ‘Well – she got the eye.’ ‘Yeah? Married two weeks and got the eye? Maybe that’s why Curley’s pants is full of ants.’ ‘I seen her give Slim the eye. Slim’s a jerkline skinner. Hell of a nice fella. Slim don’t need to wear no high-heeled boots on a grain team. I seen her give Slim the eye. Curley never seen it. An’ I seen her give Carlson the eye.’ George pretended a lack of interest. ‘Looks like we was gonna have fun.’ The swamper stood up from his box. ‘Know what I think?’ George did not answer. ‘Well, I think Curley’s married... a tart.’ ‘He ain’t the first,’ said George. ‘There’s plenty done that.’ The old man moved toward the door, and his ancient dog lifted his head and peered about, and then got painfully to his feet to follow. ‘I gotta be settin’ out the wash basins for the guys. The teams’ll be in before long. You guys gonna buck barley?’ ‘Yeah.’ ‘You won’t tell Curley nothing I said?’ ‘Hell no.’ ‘Well, you look her over, mister. You see if she ain’t a tart.’ He stepped out the door into the brilliant sunshine. Part (a) (a) What methods does Steinbeck use in this passage to present Candy? and then Part (b) (b) How do you think Steinbeck uses the character of Candy in the novel as a whole to convey important ideas about society at that time? Past question Of Mice and Men Higher

12 Read the passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). ‘I don’t want no fi ghts,’ said Lennie. He got up from his bunk and sat down at the table, across from George. Almost automatically George shuffl ed the cards and laid out his solitaire hand. He used a deliberate, thoughtful, slowness. Lennie reached for a face card and studied it, then turned it upside down and studied it. ‘Both ends the same,’ he said, ‘George, why is it both end’s the same?’ ‘I don’t know,’ said George. ‘That’s jus’ the way they make ’em. What was Slim doin’ in the barn when you seen him?’ ‘Slim?’ ‘Sure. You seen him in the barn, an’ he tol’ you not to pet the pups so much.’ ‘Oh yeah. He had a can a’ tar an’ a paint brush. I don’t know what for.’ ‘You sure that girl didn’t come in like she come in here today?’ ‘No. She never come.’ George sighed. ‘You give me a good whore house every time,’ he said. ‘A guy can go in an’ get drunk and get ever’thing outta his system all at once, an’ no messes. And he knows how much it’s gonna set him back. These here jail baits is just set on the trigger of the hoosegow.’ Lennie followed his words admiringly, and moved his lips a little to keep up. George continued, ‘You remember Andy Cushman, Lennie? Went to grammar school?’ ‘The one that his old lady used to make hot cakes for the kids?’ Lennie asked. ‘Yeah. That’s the one. You can remember anything if there’s anything to eat in it.’ George looked carefully at the solitaire hand. He put an ace up on his scoring rack and piled a two, three and four of diamonds on it. ‘Andy’s in San Quentin right now on account of a tart,’ said George. Lennie drummed on the table with his fi ngers. ‘George?’ ‘Huh?’’ ‘George, how long’s it gonna be till we get that little place an’ live on the fatta the lan’ – an’ rabbits?’ Part (a) (a) How do the details in this passage add to your understanding of George and his relationship with Lennie? and then Part (b) (b) How does Steinbeck use their relationship in the novel as a whole to convey ideas about America in the 1930s? Past question Of Mice and Men Higher

13 Read the passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). The bunk house was a long, rectangular building. Inside, the walls were whitewashed and the floor unpainted. In three walls there were small, square windows, and in the fourth, a solid door with a wooden latch. Against the walls were eight bunks, five of them made up with blankets and the other three showing their burlap ticking. Over each bunk there was nailed an apple box with the opening forward so that it made two shelves for the personal belongings of the occupant of the bunk. And these shelves were loaded with little articles, soap and talcum powder, razors and those Western magazines ranch men love to read and scoff at and secretly believe. And there were medicines on the shelves, and little vials, combs; and from nails on the box sides, a few neckties. Near one wall there was a black cast-iron stove, its stove-pipe going straight up through the ceiling. In the middle of the room stood a big square table littered with playing cards, and around it were grouped boxes for the players to sit on. At about ten o’clock in the morning the sun threw a bright dust-laden bar through one of the side windows, and in and out of the beam flies shot like rushing stars. The wooden latch raised. The door opened and a tall, stoop-shouldered old man came in. He was dressed in blue jeans and he carried a big push-broom in his left hand. Behind him came George, and behind George, Lennie. ‘The boss was expectin’ you last night,’ the old man said. ‘He was sore as hell when you wasn’t here to go out this morning.’ He pointed with his right arm, and out of the sleeve came a round stick-like wrist, but no hand. ‘You can have them two beds there,’ he said, indicating two bunks near the stove. George stepped over and threw his blankets down on the burlap sack of straw that was a mattress. He looked into the box shelf and then picked a small yellow can from it. ‘Say. What the hell’s this?’ ‘I don’t know,’ said the old man. ‘Says “positively kills lice, roaches, and other scourges”. What the hell kind of bed you giving us, anyways. We don’t want no pants rabbits.’ Part (a) (a) How does Steinbeck use details in this passage to present the bunkhouse and its inhabitants? and then Part (b) (b) In the rest of the novel, how does Steinbeck present the lives of ranch workers at that time? Past question Of Mice and Men Higher

14 Read the following passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). Both men glanced up, for the rectangle of sunshine in the doorway was cut off. A girl was standing there looking in. She had full, rouged lips and wide-spaced eyes, heavily made up. Her fingernails were red. Her hair hung in little rolled clusters, like sausages. She wore a cotton house dress and red mules, on the insteps of which were little bouquets of red ostrich feathers. ‘I’m lookin’ for Curley,’ she said. Her voice had a nasal, brittle quality. George looked away from her and then back. ‘He was in here a minute ago, but he went.’ ‘Oh!’ She put her hands behind her back and leaned against the door frame so that her body was thrown forward. ‘You’re the new fellas that just come, ain’t ya?’ ‘Yeah.’ Lennie’s eyes moved down over her body, and though she did not seem to be looking at Lennie she bridled a little. She looked at her fingernails. ‘Sometimes Curley’s in here,’ she explained. George said brusquely, ‘Well he ain’t now.’ ‘If he ain’t, I guess I better look some place else,’ she said playfully. Lennie watched her, fascinated. George said, ‘If I see him, I’ll pass the word you was looking for him.’ She smiled archly and twitched her body. ‘Nobody can’t blame a person for lookin’,’ she said. There were footsteps behind her, going by. She turned her head. ‘Hi, Slim,’ she said. Slim’s voice came through the door, ‘Hi, good-lookin’.’ ‘I’m tryin’ to find Curley, Slim.’ ‘Well, you ain’t tryin’ very hard. I seen him goin’ in your house.’ She was suddenly apprehensive. ‘Bye, boys,’ she called into the bunk house, and she hurried away. George looked around at Lennie. ‘Jesus, what a tramp,’ he said. ‘So that’s what Curley picks for a wife.’ Part (a) In this passage, what methods does Steinbeck use to present Curley’s wife and the attitudes of others to her? Refer closely to the passage in your answer. and then Part (b) How does Steinbeck present attitudes to women in the society in which the novel is set? Past question Of Mice and Men Higher

15 Read the passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). Inside the house lived a malevolent phantom. People said he existed, but Jem and I had never seen him. People said he went out at night when the moon was down, and peeped in windows. When people’s azaleas froze in a cold snap, it was because he had breathed on them. Any stealthy small crimes committed in Maycomb were his work. Once the town was terrorized by a series of morbid nocturnal events: people’s chickens and household pets were found mutilated; although the culprit was Crazy Addie, who eventually drowned himself in Barker’s Eddy, people still looked at the Radley Place, unwilling to discard their initial suspicions. A Negro would not pass the Radley Place at night he would cut across to the sidewalk opposite and whistle as he walked. The Maycomb school grounds adjoined the back of the Radley lot; from the Radley chickenyard tall pecan trees shook their fruit into the schoolyard, but the nuts lay untouched by the children: Radley pecans would kill you. A baseball hit into the Radley yard was a lost ball and no questions asked. The misery of that house began many years before Jem and I were born. The Radleys, welcome anywhere in town, kept to themselves, a predilection unforgivable in Maycomb. They did not go to church, Maycomb’s principal recreation, but worshipped at home; Mrs Radley seldom if ever crossed the street for a midmorning coffee break with her neighbours, and certainly never joined a missionary circle. Mr Radley walked to town at eleven-thirty every morning and came back promptly at twelve, sometimes carrying a brown paper bag that the neighbourhood assumed contained the family groceries. I never knew how old Mr Radley made his living – Jem said he ‘bought cotton’, a polite term for doing nothing – but Mr Radley and his wife had lived there with their two sons as long as anybody could remember. Part (a) (a) How does Lee use details in this passage to show the attitudes of Maycomb people to the Radleys? and then Part (b) (b) How is Boo Radley presented in the novel as a whole? In Part (b) write about: what Boo Radley is like the methods Lee uses to present Boo Radley. Past question To Kill a Mockingbird Foundation

16 Read the passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). Tim Johnson reached the side-street that ran in front of the Radley Place, and what remained of his poor mind made him pause and seem to consider which road he would take. He made a few hesitant steps and stopped in front of the Radley gate; then he tried to turn around, but was having difficulty. Atticus said, ‘He’s within range, Heck. You better get him now before he goes down the side street - Lord knows who’s around the corner. Go inside, Cal.’ Calpurnia opened the screen door, latched it behind her, then unlatched it and held on to the hook. She tried to block Jem and me with her body, but we looked out from beneath her arms. ‘Take him, Mr Finch.’ Mr Tate handed the rifle to Atticus; Jem and I nearly fainted. ‘Don’t waste time, Heck,’ said Atticus. ‘Go on.’ ‘Mr Finch, this is a one-shot job.’ Atticus shook his head vehemently: ‘Don’t just stand there, Heck! He won’t wait all day for you—’ ‘For God’s sake, Mr Finch, look where he is! Miss and you’ll go straight into the Radley house! I can’t shoot that well and you know it!’ ‘I haven’t shot a gun in thirty years—’ Mr Tate almost threw the rifle at Atticus. ‘I’d feel mighty comfortable if you did now,’ he said. In a fog, Jem and I watched our father take the gun and walk out into the middle of the street. He walked quickly, but I thought he moved like an underwater swimmer; time had slowed to a nauseating crawl. When Atticus raised his glasses Calpurnia murmured, ‘Sweet Jesus help him,’ and put her hands to her cheeks. Atticus pushed his glasses to his forehead; they slipped down, and he dropped them in the street. In the silence, I heard them crack. Atticus rubbed his eyes and chin; we saw him blink hard. In front of the Radley gate, Tim Johnson had made up what was left of his mind. He had finally turned himself around, to pursue his original course up our street. He made two steps forward, then stopped and raised his head. We saw his body go rigid. With movements so swift they seemed simultaneous, Atticus’s hand yanked a ball-tipped lever as he brought the gun to his shoulder. The rifle cracked. Tim Johnson leaped, flopped over and crumpled on the sidewalk in a brown-and-white heap. He didn’t know what hit him. Part (a) How does the writer use details in this passage to show that Atticus is being brave? and then Part (b) In the novel as a whole the attitudes of Atticus are different to other characters. What does this tell you about Maycomb? In part (b) you should write about: the attitudes of Atticus the attitudes of other characters in Maycomb Past question To Kill a Mockingbird Foundation

17 Read the following passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). Maycomb Ewells lived behind the town garbage dump in what was once a Negro cabin. The cabin’s plank walls were supplemented with sheets of corrugated iron, its roof shingled with tin cans hammered fl at, so only its general shape suggested its original design: square, with four tiny rooms opening on to a shotgun hall, the cabin rested uneasily upon four irregular lumps of limestone. Its windows were merely open spaces in the walls, which in the summertime were covered with greasy strips of cheesecloth to keep out the varmints that feasted on Maycomb’s refuse. The varmints had a lean time of it, for the Ewells gave the dump a thorough gleaning every day, and the fruits of their industry (those that were not eaten) made the plot of ground around the cabin look like the playhouse of an insane child: what passed for a fence was bits of tree-limbs, broomsticks and tool shafts, all tipped with rusty hammerheads, snaggle-toothed rake heads, shovels, axes and grubbing hoes, held on with pieces of barbed wire. Enclosed by this barricade was a dirty yard containing the remains of a Model-T Ford (on blocks), a discarded dentist’s chair, an ancient ice-box, plus lesser items: old shoes, worn-out table radios, picture-frames, and fruit jars, under which scrawny orange chickens pecked hopefully. One corner of the yard, though, bewildered Maycomb. Against the fence, in a line, were six chipped-enamel slop jars holding brilliant red geraniums, cared for as tenderly as if they belonged to Miss Maudie Atkinson, had Miss Maudie deigned to permit a geranium on her premises. People said they were Mayella Ewell’s. Nobody was quite sure how many children were on the place. Some people said six, others said nine; there were always several dirty-faced ones at the windows when anyone passed by. Nobody had occasion to pass by except at Christmas, when the churches delivered baskets, and when the mayor of Maycomb asked us to please help the garbage collector by dumping our own trees and trash. Part (a) How does Lee use details in this passage to show how the Ewells live? and then Part (b) How does Lee present the Ewells in other parts of the novel and what does this tell you about Maycomb? In part (b) write about: the methods Lee uses to show what the Ewells are like in the rest of the novel what the Ewells show about Maycomb. Past question To Kill a Mockingbird Foundation

18 Read the following passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). In ones and twos, men got out of the cars. Shadows became substance as light revealed solid shapes moving towards the jail door. Atticus remained where he was. The men hid him from view. ‘He in there, Mr Finch?’ a man said. ‘He is,’ we heard Atticus answer, ‘and he’s asleep. Don’t wake him up.’ In obedience to my father, there followed what I later realized was a sickeningly comic aspect of an unfunny situation: the men talked in near-whispers. ‘You know what we want,’ another man said. ‘Get aside from the door, Mr Finch.’ ‘You can turn around and go home again, Walter,’ Atticus said pleasantly. ‘Heck Tate’s around somewhere.’ ‘The hell he is,’ said another man. ‘Heck’s bunch’s so deep in the woods they won’t get out till mornin’.’ ‘Indeed? Why so?’ ‘Called ’em off on a snipe hunt,’ was the succinct answer. ‘Didn’t you think a’that, Mr Finch?’ ‘Thought about it, but didn’t believe it. Well then,’ my father’s voice was still the same, ‘that changes things, doesn’t it?’ ‘It do,’ another deep voice said. Its owner was a shadow. ‘Do you really think so?’ This was the second time I heard Atticus ask that question in two days, and it meant somebody’s man would get jumped. This was too good to miss. I broke away from Jem and ran as fast as I could to Atticus. Jem shrieked and tried to catch me, but I had a lead on him and Dill. I pushed my way through dark smelly bodies and burst into the circle of light. ‘H-ey, Atticus!’ I thought he would have a fi ne surprise, but his face killed my joy. A fl ash of plain fear was going out of his eyes, but returned when Dill and Jem wriggled into the light. There was a smell of stale whisky and pig-pen about, and when I glanced around I discovered that these men were strangers. Part (a) In this passage, what methods does Lee use to present the lynch mob? Refer closely to the passage in your answer. and then Part (b) What does the behaviour of the lynch mob tell you about society in which the novel is set? In Part (b) you should write about: what the lynch mob says and does how the lynch mob’s behaviour shows what this society is like. Past question To Kill a Mockingbird Foundation

19 Read the passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). Every town the size of Maycomb had families like the Ewells. No economic fluctuations changed their status – people like the Ewells lived as guests of the county in prosperity as well as in the depths of a depression. No truant officers could keep their numerous offspring in school; no public health officer could free them from congenital defects, various worms, and the diseases indigenous to filthy surroundings. Maycomb Ewells lived behind the town garbage dump in what was once a Negro cabin. The cabin’s plank walls were supplemented with sheets of corrugated iron, its roof shingled with tin cans hammered flat, so only its general shape suggested its original design: square, with four tiny rooms opening on to a shotgun hall, the cabin rested uneasily upon four irregular lumps of limestone. Its windows were merely open spaces in the walls, which in the summertime were covered with greasy strips of cheesecloth to keep out the varmints that feasted on Maycomb’s refuse. The varmints had a lean time of it, for the Ewells gave the dump a thorough gleaning every day, and the fruits of their industry (those that were not eaten) made the plot of ground around the cabin look like the playhouse of an insane child: what passed for a fence was bits of tree-limbs, broomsticks and tool shafts, all tipped with rusty hammer-heads, snaggle-toothed rake heads, shovels, axes and grubbing hoes, held on with pieces of barbed wire. Enclosed by this barricade was a dirty yard containing the remains of a Model-T Ford (on blocks), a discarded dentist’s chair, an ancient ice-box, plus lesser items: old shoes, worn-out table radios, picture-frames, and fruit jars, under which scrawny orange chickens pecked hopefully. One corner of the yard, though, bewildered Maycomb. Against the fence, in a line, were six chipped-enamel slop jars holding brilliant red geraniums, cared for as tenderly as if they belonged to Miss Maudie Atkinson, had Miss Maudie deigned to permit a geranium on her premises. People said they were Mayella Ewell’ s. Part (a) (a) How does Lee use details in this passage to present the position of the Ewells in Maycomb society? and then Part (b) (b) How does Lee present Mayella Ewell in the novel as a whole? Past question To Kill a Mockingbird Higher

20 Read the passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). Tim Johnson reached the side-street that ran in front of the Radley Place, and what remained of his poor mind made him pause and seem to consider which road he would take. He made a few hesitant steps and stopped in front of the Radley gate; then he tried to turn around, but was having difficulty. Atticus said, ‘He’s within range, Heck. You better get him now before he goes down the side street - Lord knows who’s around the corner. Go inside, Cal.’ Calpurnia opened the screen door, latched it behind her, then unlatched it and held on to the hook. She tried to block Jem and me with her body, but we looked out from beneath her arms. ‘Take him, Mr Finch.’ Mr Tate handed the rifle to Atticus; Jem and I nearly fainted. ‘Don’t waste time, Heck,’ said Atticus. ‘Go on.’ ‘Mr Finch, this is a one-shot job.’ Atticus shook his head vehemently: ‘Don’t just stand there, Heck! He won’t wait all day for you—’ ‘For God’s sake, Mr Finch, look where he is! Miss and you’ll go straight into the Radley house! I can’t shoot that well and you know it!’ ‘I haven’t shot a gun in thirty years—’ Mr Tate almost threw the rifle at Atticus. ‘I’d feel mighty comfortable if you did now,’ he said. In a fog, Jem and I watched our Father take the gun and walk out into the middle of the street. He walked quickly, but I thought he moved like an underwater swimmer; time had slowed to a nauseating crawl. When Atticus raised his glasses Calpurnia murmured, ‘Sweet Jesus help him,’ and put her hands to her cheeks. Atticus pushed his glasses to his forehead; they slipped down, and he dropped them in the street. In the silence, I heard them crack. Atticus rubbed his eyes and chin; we saw him blink hard. In front of the Radley gate, Tim Johnson had made up what was left of his mind. He had finally turned himself around, to pursue his original course up our street. He made two steps forward, then stopped and raised his head. We saw his body go rigid. With movements so swift they seemed simultaneous, Atticus’s hand yanked a ball-tipped lever as he brought the gun to his shoulder. The rifle cracked. Tim Johnson leaped, flopped over and crumpled on the sidewalk in a brown-and-white heap. He didn’t know what hit him. Part (a) (a) What methods does Lee use to build up a sense of danger in this passage? and then Part (b) (b) How does Lee use Atticus in one other event in the novel to show injustice in America in the 1930s? Past question To Kill a Mockingbird Higher

21 Read the passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). ‘I simply want to tell you that there are some men in this world who were born to do our unpleasant jobs for us. Your father’s one of them.’ ‘Oh,’ said Jem. ‘Well.’ ‘Don’t you oh well me, sir,’ Miss Maudie replied, recognizing Jem’s fatalistic noises, ‘you are not old enough to appreciate what I said.’ Jem was staring at his half-eaten cake. ‘It’s like bein’ a caterpillar in a cocoon, that’s what it is,’ he said. ‘Like somethin’ asleep wrapped up in a warm place. I always thought Maycomb folks were the best folks in the world, least that’s what they seemed like.’ ‘We’re the safest folks in the world,’ said Miss Maudie. ‘We’re so rarely called on to be Christians, but when we are, we’ve got men like Atticus to go for us.’ Jem grinned ruefully. ‘Wish the rest of the county thought that.’ ‘You’d be surprised how many of us do.’ ‘Who?’ Jem’s voice rose. ‘Who in this town did one thing to help Tom Robinson, just who?’ ‘His coloured friends for one thing, and people like us. People like Judge Taylor. People like Mr Heck Tate. Stop eating and start thinking, Jem. Did it ever strike you that Judge Taylor naming Atticus to defend that boy was no accident? That Judge Taylor might have had his reasons for naming him?’ This was a thought. Court-appointed defences were usually given to Maxwell Green, Maycomb’s latest addition to the bar, who needed the experience. Maxwell Green should have had Tom Robinson’s case. ‘You think about that,’ Miss Maudie was saying. ‘It was no accident. I was sittin’ there on the porch last night, waiting. I waited and waited to see you all come down the sidewalk, and as I waited I thought, Atticus Finch won’t win, he can’t win, but he’s the only man in these parts who can keep a jury out so long in a case like that. And I thought to myself, well, we’re making a step - it’s just a baby-step, but it’s a step.’ ‘’t’s all right to talk like that - can’t any Christian judges an’ lawyers make up for heathen juries,’ Jem muttered. ‘Soon’s I get grown—’ ‘That’s something you’ll have to take up with your father,’ Miss Maudie said. Part (a) (a) How does Lee use details in this passage to present Miss Maude’s view of Maycomb? and then Part (b) (b) In the novel as a whole, how does Lee show what life was like in a small town such as Maycomb in 1930s southern America? Past question To Kill a Mockingbird Higher

22 Read the passage and then answer part (a) and part (b). ‘What’d you get for Christmas?’ I asked politely. ‘Just what I asked for,’ he said. Francis had requested a pair of knee-pants, a red leather booksack, five shirts and an untied bow-tie. ‘That’s nice,’ I lied. ‘Jem and me got air-rifles, and Jem got a chemistry set—’ ‘A toy one, I reckon.’ ‘No, a real one. He’s gonna make me some invisible ink, and I’m gonna write to Dill in it.’ Francis asked what was the use of that. ‘Well, can’t you just see his face when he gets a letter from me with nothing in it? It’ll drive him nuts.’ Talking to Francis gave me the sensation of settling slowly to the bottom of the ocean. He was the most boring child I ever met. As he lived in Mobile, he could not inform on me to school authorities, but he managed to tell everything he knew to Aunt Alexandra, who in turn unburdened herself to Atticus, who either forgot it or gave me hell, whichever struck his fancy. But the only time I ever heard Atticus speak sharply to anyone was when I once heard him say, ‘Sister I do the best I can with them!’ It had something to do with my going around in overalls. Aunt Alexandra was fanatical on the subject of my attire. I could not possibly hope to be a lady if I wore breeches; when I said I could do nothing in a dress, she said I wasn’t supposed to be doing things that required pants. Aunt Alexandra’s vision of my deportment involved playing with small stoves, tea-sets, and wearing the Add-A-Pearl necklace she gave me when I was born; futhermore, I should be a ray of sunshine in my father’s lonely life. I suggested that one could be a ray of sunshine in pants just as well, but Aunty said that one had to behave like a sunbeam, that I was born good but had grown progressively worse every year. She hurt my feelings and set my teeth permanently on edge, but when I asked Atticus about it, he said there were already enough sunbeams in the family and to go on about my business, he didn’t mind me much the way I was. At Christmas dinner, I sat at the little table in the dining-room; Jem and Francis sat with the adults at the dining table. Aunty had continued to isolate me long after Jem and Francis graduated to the big table. I often wondered what she thought I’d do, get up and throw something? I sometimes thought of asking her if she would let me sit at the big table with the rest of them just once, I would prove to her how civilized I could be; after all, I ate at home every day with no major mishaps. When I begged Atticus to use his influence, he said he had none – we were guests, and we sat where she told us to sit. He also said Aunt Alexandra didn’t understand girls much, she’d never had one. Part (a) In this passage, what methods does Lee use to present Scout’s feelings about Aunt Alexandra and Francis? Refer closely to the passage in your answer. and then Part (b) In the novel, how does Lee show that other people expect Scout to behave in particular ways? What do you think these expectations show about the society in which the novel is set? Past question To Kill a Mockingbird Higher


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