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June 4, 2012 1.  Why are we spending time discussing elements of effective group work ?  Effective and collaborative group work requires an intentional.

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Presentation on theme: "June 4, 2012 1.  Why are we spending time discussing elements of effective group work ?  Effective and collaborative group work requires an intentional."— Presentation transcript:

1 June 4,

2  Why are we spending time discussing elements of effective group work ?  Effective and collaborative group work requires an intentional effort and typically does not happen by accident.  Developing collaborative groups: Key elements that contribute to effective and collaborative group work:  Clarity regarding the following key elements contributes to effective group work:  The group’s tasks  Goals and outcomes  Rationale and assumptions  The existing situation/background  Participation and commitments  Decision-making  Managing conflict effectively  Norms of operation  Parameters  Timelines 2

3  “A district cannot experience the benefits of defined autonomy (loose-tight leadership) when confusion reigns regarding nondiscretionary priorities (the tight).” DuFour and Marzano, Agree Strongly Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree

4 The District PLC Leadership Team’s Tasks:  To make PLC decisions  To clarify numerous aspects of the PLC work  To articulate expectations, accountability, consistency, non- negotiables, and role clarification = “The Tight”  To work collaboratively to address and resolve PLC implementation issues 4

5 Of The District PLC Leadership Team’s Work:  Help to establish the common work of schools within the district that serves as the glue holding the district together  Help to determine the established boundaries, and acknowledge necessary latitude at the school sites because there are multiple pathways for proceeding  Provide clarification regarding the actionable steps that schools are expected to take and the evidence that will demonstrate that the steps have been taken 5

6  “Talking is not doing. Planning is not doing. Goal setting is not doing. Training is not doing. Directing resources to support a plan is not doing. It is not until people are doing differently that any organization can expect different results. A district must take steps to ensure that talking, planning, training, and resources actually result in action.” Learning by Doing (DuFour, DoFour, Eaker, & Many, 2010)  “Effective districts engage all members of the organization in processes to:  Clarify priorities  Clarify the specific conditions that must be created in each school to achieve the priorities  Build the capacity of people to succeed in what they are being called upon to do  Determine the indicators of progress to be monitored carefully  Align leadership behaviors with the articulated priorities.” Learning by Doing (DuFour, DoFour, Eaker, & Many, 2010)  “A district cannot experience the benefits of defined autonomy (loose- tight leadership) when confusion reigns regarding nondiscretionary priorities (the tight).” Leaders of Learning (DuFour & Marzano, 2011) 6

7  Schools and districts need not choose between demanding adherence to certain core principles and practices or empowering the staff. Certain critical issues must be addressed, and certain important tasks must be accomplished in a PLC. The district and the school are tight in those areas, demanding faithfulness to specific principles and practices. At the same time, however, individuals and teams can benefit from considerable autonomy and freedom in terms of how things get done on a day –to-day basis because the school and district is loose about much of the implementation. Members of the organization have the benefit of clear parameters that provide direction and coherence to the improvement process; however, they are also given the freedom and tools to make their own contribution to that process. Learning by Doing (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, and Many, 2010)  Leaders in RCAS have embraced the concept of simultaneous loose-tight leadership (defined autonomy). Data sources have indicated leaders’ and teachers’ request for clarification regarding numerous aspects of the PLC work and for the need for clear expectations, accountability, consistency, non-negotiables, and role clarification. 7

8 The District PLC Leadership Team  Provide leadership at the district level to move the PLC process forward  Provide leadership to make PLC decisions and to resolve PLC implementation issues  Play a district-level leadership role to build a collaborative culture focused on student learning  Communicate with colleagues and other stakeholders regarding PLC decisions  Meet twice a month for 2-3 hours (at least initially) 8

9 Decision Making:  Sufficient Consensus  Shared understanding of what consensus means and does not mean Managing Conflict Effectively: Styles of Conflict: Strategies for managing cooperativeness and assertiveness:  Be aware of one’s own “default” style and make corresponding adjustments.  Take ideas off the table as well as put them on the table.  Support the collaborative efforts and decisions of the team.  Actively participate in group work by submitting ideas, using clear communication, and engaging in respectful interchanges. 9

10  Norms represent protocols and commitments developed by a team to guide members in working together. Norms help team members clarify expectations regarding how they will work together to achieve their shared goals.  Current Norms of Operation  Respect the speaker’s and each other’s ideas and opinions.  Follow the agenda.  Have cell phones on vibrate for emergencies and only leave the room to take a cell phone call if it is an emergency.  Be on time so that we start and finish on time.  Provide time to process information and learning, i.e. a natural opportunity for appropriate side bar discussions to take place.  Participate and listen actively.  Be aware of your audience.  Be here now!  How can this team ensure commitment to the established norms? 10

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12  To make a consensual decision regarding these PLC issues: Issue #1:How will the Wednesday afternoon time be utilized? (Acceptable and unacceptable staff practices) Issue #2:In what ways will the district practice accountability – at both the building and the classroom levels? Issue #3:How will we manage situations in which teachers teach more than one content area? Issue #4: How will we accommodate district-level needs (examples: ELA leadership team work, technology PD), and what will be the expectation for those teachers not involved in district-level work? 12

13  3 Groups  Ways of Talking: Dialogue and Discussion  Dialogue; Research/Professional Literature  Sub-group Recommendation and Rationale  Refinement by Large Group 13

14  Reconnect with Learning Targets and Criteria for Success  “The best leaders recognize that leadership requires more than noble intentions; it demands determined doing and an action orientation. The best leaders do not let visionary thinking, planning, and lofty rhetoric substitute for purposeful action. They engage others in clarifying the very specific steps that must be taken to realize the purpose they serve.” DuFour & Marzano, 2012  Thank you for your role in clarifying some specific PLC steps today! Have a great summer! 14


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