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The Sensual Geographies of Difference Some perspectives on a sense of place.

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Presentation on theme: "The Sensual Geographies of Difference Some perspectives on a sense of place."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Sensual Geographies of Difference Some perspectives on a sense of place

2 Steve Rawlinson Principal Lecturer Northumbria University GA Primary Geography Champion Steve Rawlinson Principal Lecturer Northumbria University GA Primary Geography Champion

3 Aims of this session Different people hold different senses of placeDifferent people hold different senses of place How can we engage the senses to explore an individuals sense of place?How can we engage the senses to explore an individuals sense of place? The role of perception in developing a sense of placeThe role of perception in developing a sense of place

4 Aims… Fresh perspective on the value of using the senses when exploring place with childrenFresh perspective on the value of using the senses when exploring place with children Senses are an input – my response, your response, to that input leads to difference...Senses are an input – my response, your response, to that input leads to difference... Emotional senses and placeEmotional senses and place

5 Engaging the senses Louv – nature deficit disorderLouv – nature deficit disorder Tuan – nature averseTuan – nature averse Need to offer children opportunities to engage with their senses moreNeed to offer children opportunities to engage with their senses more KS2/KS3 curriculum demands development of enquiry, graphicacy, visual literacy and geographical communication – sensory activities.KS2/KS3 curriculum demands development of enquiry, graphicacy, visual literacy and geographical communication – sensory activities.

6 Stimuli Different Stimuli bring out the differences that people have about a place Maps/photographs - sightMaps/photographs - sight Music - hearingMusic - hearing Food – tasteFood – taste Artefacts – touch/smellArtefacts – touch/smell Lets explore some of these…

7 Island map Open up your mapOpen up your map Discuss what you have put and where and why?Discuss what you have put and where and why? How will your senses be engaged on this island?How will your senses be engaged on this island? You have now developed some empathy with this island and how different people view it differentlyYou have now developed some empathy with this island and how different people view it differently

8 Island Map Provides a stimulus to get children talkingProvides a stimulus to get children talking Enables them to develop geographical language soEnables them to develop geographical language so Their sense of place can be sharedTheir sense of place can be shared See Witt & Rawlinson (2012), Primary Geography 78

9 Developing the activity – with acknowledgement to Rex Walford... Shipwrecked – where would you locate your settlement? Differences would emerge...values/attitudesShipwrecked – where would you locate your settlement? Differences would emerge...values/attitudes Build island with Lego – enables experimentation with locationsBuild island with Lego – enables experimentation with locations Sense of touch engaged – kinaesthetic learners/visual literacySense of touch engaged – kinaesthetic learners/visual literacy Map from the modelMap from the model

10 Interrogate the map/ model Q you might ask: What would you see/taste/smell/touch/ hear at different places?What would you see/taste/smell/touch/ hear at different places? Which sounds/tastes/smells etc are natural and which are man made?Which sounds/tastes/smells etc are natural and which are man made? Makes the children look at the place through different senses...Makes the children look at the place through different senses...

11 Further development - Desert Island discs The sense of hearing... Think of the sound track you would take to a desert island – tracks that remind you of particular placesThink of the sound track you would take to a desert island – tracks that remind you of particular places Can you identify one for each sense?Can you identify one for each sense? Again by sharing these you begin to see how children have developed their sense of place – good way of getting to know your children...transition phaseAgain by sharing these you begin to see how children have developed their sense of place – good way of getting to know your children...transition phase

12 Further Developments… What would they pack to their new home...? Make this specific by specifying the weather/climate they will encounter... Is the Island volcanic...? Will this change what they take? Again their senses will bring them images etc...

13 And another development…its a Mystery Children love mysteries Whose choice of soundtrack/suitcase is this?Whose choice of soundtrack/suitcase is this? Could have a 20 questions type of approach to see if they can discover who chose whatCould have a 20 questions type of approach to see if they can discover who chose what This technique can be further developed using the what's in the box? approach discussed laterThis technique can be further developed using the what's in the box? approach discussed later

14 Personal Geographies and a Sense of Place A sense of place describes a particular kind of relationship between individuals and localities. For individuals different places are imbued with different meanings (Matthews, 1992) Massey (1991) also suggests that places have multiple identities...

15 Developing a Sense of Place Relationship between individuals and a place – attachments Your Special Place?Your Special Place? What makes it special?What makes it special? Can you relate it to any of your senses – a special sight/taste/sound etc...Can you relate it to any of your senses – a special sight/taste/sound etc... What would you change? Why?What would you change? Why? Different values/attitudes colour personal geographiesDifferent values/attitudes colour personal geographies

16 Activity – changing perceptions of place using the senses… Discuss with your partner your perception of Madison (New York) What has influenced your view? Have you ever been there for example?What has influenced your view? Have you ever been there for example? How will your senses be assailed if you go there? What will you see, hear, smell etc...?How will your senses be assailed if you go there? What will you see, hear, smell etc...?

17 Activity cont... View the pictures?View the pictures? Do these change your sense of place?Do these change your sense of place? Do they confirm your sense engagement? Do they confirm your sense engagement?

18 Interrogating photographs How do the photographs make you feel – use a word list for promptHow do the photographs make you feel – use a word list for prompt Provide stickers to represent emotions – red for angry, blue for sad etcProvide stickers to represent emotions – red for angry, blue for sad etc Put yourself in the picture – ask them to use their senses to say how they feelPut yourself in the picture – ask them to use their senses to say how they feel Interview someone in the photographInterview someone in the photograph Act out what happened in the moment after the photo takenAct out what happened in the moment after the photo taken These Q encourage diversity of answers – different people have different views about same place

19 Activity… Listen to the musicListen to the music Does this change your perception? How? In particular consider how your senses may now have different imagesDoes this change your perception? How? In particular consider how your senses may now have different images

20 Walking down Madison Senses engagement from the song... Touch – held out hand you pay no attention to – bag lady frozen asleep in the parkTouch – held out hand you pay no attention to – bag lady frozen asleep in the park Taste – sandwich you hadTaste – sandwich you had Smell – squalid areas – rats in the basement - cardboard citySmell – squalid areas – rats in the basement - cardboard city Sight – beaming boy from Harlem with the air force coatSight – beaming boy from Harlem with the air force coat Hearing – never shot no oneHearing – never shot no one

21 Review… Music brings a different dimensionMusic brings a different dimension Emotional senses e.g. Sense of guilt… the differences between the haves and the have not's...feel guilty about the coat on your backEmotional senses e.g. Sense of guilt… the differences between the haves and the have not's...feel guilty about the coat on your back The sensual geography of difference...The sensual geography of difference...

22 Perceptions of places can change... From experience – direct and indirectFrom experience – direct and indirect From imagesFrom images From musicFrom music The role of the media/technology is crucial in changing our perceptions of the world today

23 Review Different senses bring out different perceptions from different people – Tanner (2012) – different inputsDifferent senses bring out different perceptions from different people – Tanner (2012) – different inputs Guide books give us previsit perception/memories and leads to personal post visit perceptionsGuide books give us previsit perception/memories and leads to personal post visit perceptions Memories are powerful evocations of a place and time – enable differences to be highlighted...Memories are powerful evocations of a place and time – enable differences to be highlighted...

24 Developing a sense of place with children Opportunities to get outside the classroom to develop thisOpportunities to get outside the classroom to develop this Start local – from where the children knowStart local – from where the children know Structure their curiosity – asking the right questionsStructure their curiosity – asking the right questions Learning framework – 8 Way ThinkingLearning framework – 8 Way Thinking Likes and dislikes – emotional geographyLikes and dislikes – emotional geography

25 Emotional Geography Tanner (2010) in Primary Geography Handbook by S Scoffham (ed) Catling (2003) - childrens experience of places is a vital part of their lives, contributing to their sense of self, identity and self esteem Scoffham (1998) young children are natural geographers

26 Emotionally literate geography education enables children to Recognise personal attachment to a placeRecognise personal attachment to a place Acknowledge power of place to provoke affective responses – see Tanner (2009)Acknowledge power of place to provoke affective responses – see Tanner (2009) Express emotions about placesExpress emotions about places Understand the feelings of others about placesUnderstand the feelings of others about places Express/communicate responses in different waysExpress/communicate responses in different ways Understand environmental issues may arouse strong feelingsUnderstand environmental issues may arouse strong feelings Express their own feelings appropriatelyExpress their own feelings appropriately

27 Using fieldwork to develop a personal sense of place Martin (2006) suggests such an approach Values diversity rather than perceiving differences negativelyValues diversity rather than perceiving differences negatively Leads to a rich sense of our placeLeads to a rich sense of our place Gives a positive foundation for distant locality studies which views difference as a positive not a negativeGives a positive foundation for distant locality studies which views difference as a positive not a negative

28 The fieldwork approach Provides a multi-sensory approach reflecting research on learning styles and multiple intelligencesProvides a multi-sensory approach reflecting research on learning styles and multiple intelligences Acknowledges place attachment – childrens sense of identity is closely tied to their local area. Tanner (2009) offers activities to explore this.Acknowledges place attachment – childrens sense of identity is closely tied to their local area. Tanner (2009) offers activities to explore this. Also gives opportunities to identify the multiple identities that places exhibit – Massey (1991)Also gives opportunities to identify the multiple identities that places exhibit – Massey (1991)

29 Some activities... Photographs taken by the children for a purposePhotographs taken by the children for a purpose Journey sticksJourney sticks Make a feelings mapMake a feelings map Each child makes a My Place book – scrapbooking – see Witt (2010)Each child makes a My Place book – scrapbooking – see Witt (2010)

30 Linking discovering Need to enable children to use their senses to discover the world about them 8 Way Thinking provides a framework for looking at the world Either the real world via fieldworkthe real world via fieldworkor the virtual world via mediathe virtual world via media

31 8 Way Thinking Devised by Ian GilbertDevised by Ian Gilbert Derived from Around Deeply ProjectDerived from Around Deeply Project Multi-dimensional snapshot of the people, places, history, sights, sounds and nature of locations on a voyage round Britain.Multi-dimensional snapshot of the people, places, history, sights, sounds and nature of locations on a voyage round Britain. Thinking skills project encouraging participant to:Thinking skills project encouraging participant to: ThinkThink ReflectReflect Look more closelyLook more closely

32 Links with: Gardners Multiple Intelligence Theory (MI)Gardners Multiple Intelligence Theory (MI) Philosophy for Children (P4C)Philosophy for Children (P4C) De Bonos six Thinking HatsDe Bonos six Thinking Hats Thinking SkillsThinking Skills

33 8 Way thinking Combining thinking skills scaffolding, P4C practices and MI theory to produce headings/focus for investigation Logical/MathematicalLogical/Mathematical Verbal/LinguisticVerbal/Linguistic InterpersonalInterpersonal IntrapersonalIntrapersonal NaturalisticNaturalistic Body/PhysicalBody/Physical MusicalMusical Visual/SpatialVisual/Spatial

34 Terminology simplified PeoplePeople NumbersNumbers WordsWords NatureNature SoundsSounds FeelingsFeelings SightsSights ActionsActions

35

36 It is a model for Asking questions across subjectsAsking questions across subjects Arousing and harnessing curiosityArousing and harnessing curiosity Seeing with new eyesSeeing with new eyes For geography It offers a new integrated approach for thematic planningIt offers a new integrated approach for thematic planning A different means of developing a sense of place – engages the sensesA different means of developing a sense of place – engages the senses

37 The technique has been used with Secondary PGCE studentsSecondary PGCE students Primary Undergraduate and PG studentsPrimary Undergraduate and PG students Y1 Geography undergraduatesY1 Geography undergraduates Children of various ages/key stagesChildren of various ages/key stages

38 ast Past Ouseburn Present People: Childrens life, jobs people did and housing. Numbers: How many bridges, arches and compare value of money. Words: Geordie words, Accents in area and songs. Nature: Wild life, pollution and food. Sights: Types of boats, bridges and wildlife. Actions: Tourism, air raid and recycling. Feelings: Pictures, Victoria Tunnel and childhood. Sounds: Industrial, transport and wildlife. Geography Art & DesignP.E. History

39 Janes plan

40 Looking and experiencing We can look at a place in a photo but we need to go there to experience it.We can look at a place in a photo but we need to go there to experience it. Awe and wonderAwe and wonder A picture of Cadair Idris has an impact – engages visual sensesA picture of Cadair Idris has an impact – engages visual senses Taking you to Cadair engages all the senses and so you experience the place...the true sensual geography of difference?Taking you to Cadair engages all the senses and so you experience the place...the true sensual geography of difference?

41 Place in a box – with due respect to Howard Lisle Summary activity Can you put your sense of place in a box...and will what is in your box differ from someone elses?

42 Place in a box... Sensory geography can be overwhelmingSensory geography can be overwhelming Useful to summarise sense of place – put it in a boxUseful to summarise sense of place – put it in a box Ideally have a box of sensory materials to engage all the senses e.g. Photos/maps/food/artefacts etcIdeally have a box of sensory materials to engage all the senses e.g. Photos/maps/food/artefacts etc Enables sensory exploration...Catling (2012)Enables sensory exploration...Catling (2012)

43 Activity – Morpeth in a box Look at the box on your tableLook at the box on your table Can you identify the senses I engaged with to build up this picture of Morpeth – which picture represents which sense?Can you identify the senses I engaged with to build up this picture of Morpeth – which picture represents which sense? There may be differences of opinion again!There may be differences of opinion again!

44 Review… Each item chosen for specific personal reason – Tanner (2012)Each item chosen for specific personal reason – Tanner (2012) Explaining why item chosen is as important as the actual item – very personalExplaining why item chosen is as important as the actual item – very personal Reveals the sensual geography of difference...Reveals the sensual geography of difference...

45 Activity What images would you put in your box of your home area? Why those things?What images would you put in your box of your home area? Why those things? What artefacts could you bring to add to the box?What artefacts could you bring to add to the box? Try and involve all the senses – what is the smell of your place, what is the taste etc?Try and involve all the senses – what is the smell of your place, what is the taste etc? What questions would you ask about each item?What questions would you ask about each item?

46 Applying 8 Way Thinking to Whats in the Box? If we take an artefact out of box we could ask… People – who made this, how did they make it, can we make it?People – who made this, how did they make it, can we make it? Numbers – is this common/rare. Why is it rare?Numbers – is this common/rare. Why is it rare? Sights and Words – describe this – one draws/one describesSights and Words – describe this – one draws/one describes Nature – what is it made of?Nature – what is it made of?

47 8 Way Thinking - artefact… Sounds – what sound does it make? What sounds were made when it was made? Songs of workers?Sounds – what sound does it make? What sounds were made when it was made? Songs of workers? Feelings – feelings it gives you? how did people feel when they made it? Imagine they lost it – story opportunityFeelings – feelings it gives you? how did people feel when they made it? Imagine they lost it – story opportunity Actions – what else could this be used for?Actions – what else could this be used for?

48 Review - 8 way artefact The different ways in which children react to the objects are the keyThe different ways in which children react to the objects are the key Again we are into the geographies of differenceAgain we are into the geographies of difference By engaging the senses we can make these all the more meaningful and… Explore childrens perceptions, values, emotions etcExplore childrens perceptions, values, emotions etc You get to know your children very quickly this way.You get to know your children very quickly this way.

49 Conclusions Interaction enables differences to be exploredInteraction enables differences to be explored The senses provide a mechanism for thisThe senses provide a mechanism for this Difference should be seen as a strength not something to be fearedDifference should be seen as a strength not something to be feared

50 Conclusions Engaging the senses enables childrens personal geographies to be exploredEngaging the senses enables childrens personal geographies to be explored Makes the geography realMakes the geography real Gives you an insight into their values and attitudes.Gives you an insight into their values and attitudes.

51 Future differences Need to look to the futureNeed to look to the future Children will see this differently – see Dolan (2012)Children will see this differently – see Dolan (2012) Rich source of engagement with the sensual geographies of differenceRich source of engagement with the sensual geographies of difference See Primary Geography Spring 2011 which has a focus on FuturesSee Primary Geography Spring 2011 which has a focus on Futures

52 A final Practical application - Transition Overcoming the fear of difference as children move up through schoolsOvercoming the fear of difference as children move up through schools Year 6 devise a sensual trail for year 5 to explore their new environmentYear 6 devise a sensual trail for year 5 to explore their new environment Year 5 explore each others schools before move up – avoids parochialism – they see where their new class mates come fromYear 5 explore each others schools before move up – avoids parochialism – they see where their new class mates come from

53 Transition Tanner (2009) – geography of favourite places – get children to share...Tanner (2009) – geography of favourite places – get children to share... Engages the emotions – Tanner (2010) suggests this enables children to:Engages the emotions – Tanner (2010) suggests this enables children to: –Develop empathy for others feelings about places –Understand the representation of different places via different media

54 So please... Use the geography of difference and sensual geographies to help children understand that difference is positive!

55 Questions/discussion points? Will you incorporate any of these ideas in your future teaching?

56 References 8 Way thinking Gilbert, Ian issue 12 summer PowerPoints Living geography: 8 Ways Fieldwork rd2008/ rd2008/ 8 Way Thinking: Evolution & Evaluation ester2009/ ester2009/ Kens war story - 8.shtml 8.shtml 8.shtml

57 Refs Balderstone, D (2006) Secondary Geography Handbook GA Barlow, A & Brook, A (2010) Geography and Art: Local area work Primary Geographer, 72 pp Catling, S. (2003) Geography Contested: primary geography and social justice Geography, 88, 3, pp Catling, S (2012) The place of artefacts in Geography Primary Geography, 78, p30 Dolan, A (2012) Future talk over story time Primary Geography 78, pp Firth, R. & Biddulph,M (2009) Whose life is it anyway? in Mitchell, D (ed) (2009) Living Geography Chris Kington publishing Haynes, S (2010) Challenging perceptions of place Primary Geographer, 72 pp Challenging perceptions of placeChallenging perceptions of place Louv, R (2005) Last Child in the Woods Algonquin Martin, F (2006) Teaching Geography in Primary Schools Chris Kington Massey, D (1991) A global sense of place in Barnes, T & Gregory, D (1997) Reading Human Geography: the poetics and politics of inquiry, Arnold

58 Refs... Owens, P (2008) MyWalks; Walk on the Child Side Primary Geographer 67, pp 25-8 Scoffham, S (1998) Places, attachment & identity in Scoffham, S (ed) Primary Sources: Research findings in Primary Geography GA pp.26-7 Tanner, J (2009) Special Places: Place attachment and childrens happiness Primary Geographer, 68 pp 5-8 Tanner, J (2010) Geography and the emotions in Primary Geography Handbook, ed S Scoffham, GA Tanner, J (2012) How do you see it? Primary Geography, 78, pp Taylor, L (2005) Re-presenting Geography Chris Kington publishing (Chapt 6) Tuan, Y (2001) Space and Place Univ of Minnesota Walford, R (2007) Using Games in School Geography Chris Kington publishing – chapter 11, First Landfall Witt, S (2010) Geography and Art; Happy spaces, happy places Primary Geographer, 72 pp Witt, S & Sudbury, J (2010) Geography and Art: A sense of place at Bishop's Waltham Junior School Primary Geographer, 72 pp Geography and Art: A sense of place at Bishop's Waltham Junior SchoolGeography and Art: A sense of place at Bishop's Waltham Junior School


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