Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles What Is a Vertebrate? Fishes Amphibians Reptiles Vertebrate History in Rocks Table of Contents.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles What Is a Vertebrate? Fishes Amphibians Reptiles Vertebrate History in Rocks Table of Contents."— Presentation transcript:

1 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles What Is a Vertebrate? Fishes Amphibians Reptiles Vertebrate History in Rocks Table of Contents

2 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles - What Is a Vertebrate? Ancient Jawless Fish Look backward in time, into an ocean 530 million years ago. There you see a strange-looking creaturea jawless fishthat is about as long as your index finger.

3 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles - What Is a Vertebrate? Characteristics of Chordates This lancelet shows the characteristics of a chordate: a notochord, a nerve cord down its back, and gill slits.

4 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles Building Vocabulary A definition states the meaning of a word or phrase by telling about its most important feature or function. After you read the section, reread the paragraphs that contain definitions of Key Terms. Use the information you have learned to write a definition of each Key Term in your own words. Key Terms:Examples: - What Is a Vertebrate? chordateAll members of this phylum are called chordates. notochordThe phylum name Chordata comes from the notochord, a flexible rod that supports a chordates back. vertebraYou can see in Figure 2 that the backbone is formed by many similar bones called vertebrae. Key Terms:Examples: ectotherm endotherm An ectotherm is an animal whose body does not produce much internal heat. The beaver is an example of an endotherman animal whose body regulates its own temperature by controlling the internal heat it produces.

5 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles Links on Vertebrates Click the SciLinks button for links on vertebrates. - What Is a Vertebrate?

6 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles End of Section: What Is a Vertebrate?

7 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles - Fishes Characteristics of Fishes Most fishes obtain oxygen through gills.

8 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles - Fishes Bony Fishes A bony fish has jaws, scales, a pocket on each side of the head that holds the gills, and a skeleton made of hard bones.

9 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles Before you read, preview Figure 12. Then write two questions that you have about the diagram in a graphic organizer like the one below. As you read, answer your questions. Previewing Visuals Structure of a Fish Q. What is a swim bladder? A. A swim bladder is an internal, gas-filled sac that helps stabilize the fish at different depths in the water. Q. What is the function of the tail fin? A. It helps provide the power for swimming. - Fishes

10 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles End of Section: Fishes

11 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles - Amphibians What Is an Amphibian? During its metamorphosis from tadpole to adult, a frogs body changes dramatically.

12 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles - Amphibians Living on Land Many adult amphibians have lungs, a heart with three chambers, and a double-loop circulatory system.

13 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles Sequencing Make a cycle diagram like the one below that shows the different stages of a frogs metamorphosis during its life cycle. Write each step of the process in a separate circle. Frog Metamorphosis Adult frog Fertilized egg Tadpole hatches. Hind legs develop. Front legs develop. Tail is absorbed. - Amphibians

14 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles More on The Frog Life Cycle Click the PHSchool.com button for an activity about the frog life cycle. - Amphibians

15 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles End of Section: Amphibians

16 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles - Reptiles Adaptations for Life on Land The membranes and shell of an amniotic egg protect the developing embryo.

17 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles - Reptiles Characteristics of a Lizard This lizard, a Jacksons chameleon, has many adaptations that help it survive in its environment.

18 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles The Sex Ratio of Newly Hatched Alligators The temperature of the developing eggs of the American alligator affects the sex ratio of the young. (Sex ratio is the number of females compared with the number of males.) - Reptiles

19 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles The Sex Ratio of Newly Hatched Alligators 29.4ºC Reading Graphs: At which temperature(s) did only females hatch? - Reptiles

20 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles The Sex Ratio of Newly Hatched Alligators The warmer the incubation temperature, the greater the proportion of males. Drawing Conclusions: What effect does the temperature of developing eggs have on the sex of the baby alligators? - Reptiles

21 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles The Sex Ratio of Newly Hatched Alligators According to the graph, out of the 50 alligators that were incubated at 31.7ºC, about 40 (or 80%) were males. So 80% of 100 eggs (80) could be expected to hatch as males. Calculating: If 100 eggs developed at 31.7ºC, about how many of the young would be male? - Reptiles

22 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles - Reptiles Extinct Reptiles–The Dinosaurs Dinosaurs were the earliest vertebrates that had legs positioned directly beneath their bodies.

23 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles Main Idea Detail Identifying Main Ideas As you read the information under the heading Adaptations for Life on Land, write the main idea in a graphic organizer like the one below. Then write three supporting details that further explain the main idea. Reptiles are adapted to conserve water. Reptiles have a thick, scaly skin that prevents water loss. Reptile eggs have a shell and membranes that keep them from drying out. A reptiles kidneys concentrate wastes before excreting them so that little water is lost. - Reptiles

24 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles More on Reptiles Click the PHSchool.com button for an activity about reptiles. - Reptiles

25 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles End of Section: Reptiles

26 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles - Vertebrate History in Rocks Interpretation of Fossils Fossils most often form in layers of sedimentary rock.

27 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles - Vertebrate History in Rocks Interpretation of Fossils The pattern of vertebrate evolution is branching.

28 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles Asking Questions Before you read, preview the red headings. In a graphic organizer like the one below, ask a what or how question for each heading. As you read, write answers to your questions. How do fossils form? Fossils form from imprints or the remains of organisms. How are fossils interpreted? Scientists examine fossil structure and make comparisons to present- day organisms. QuestionsAnswers - Vertebrate History in Rocks

29 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles Links on Fossils Click the SciLinks button for links on fossils. - Vertebrate History in Rocks

30 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles End of Section: Vertebrate History in Rocks

31 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles Graphic Organizer The larvae of amphibians are adapted for life in water, and adult amphibians are adapted for life on land. Larvae have tails for swimming; adults have legs for walking. Detail Main Idea Larvae have gills; adults have lungs. Larvae have one-loop circulatory systems and two-chambered hearts; adults have two-loop circulatory systems and three-chambered hearts.

32 Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles End of Section: Graphic Organizer


Download ppt "Fishes, Amphibians, and Reptiles What Is a Vertebrate? Fishes Amphibians Reptiles Vertebrate History in Rocks Table of Contents."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google