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REPORTING EDUCATION ENVIRONMENTS FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES AGES 3-5 November 1, 2006 Mary Schertz, Consultant Iowa Department of Education.

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Presentation on theme: "REPORTING EDUCATION ENVIRONMENTS FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES AGES 3-5 November 1, 2006 Mary Schertz, Consultant Iowa Department of Education."— Presentation transcript:

1 REPORTING EDUCATION ENVIRONMENTS FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES AGES 3-5 November 1, 2006 Mary Schertz, Consultant Iowa Department of Education

2 Part B, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Implementation of FAPE Requirements Child Count Data for 2006 Authorization: P.L , Section 618 (a)(1)(A)(ii), Section 618 (a)(1)(A)(iii), and Section 618(a)(3);34CFR§§ , , (b),

3 WHEN? All staffings beginning November 6, 2006 Determine new setting codes for all staffings that have occurred since July 1, 2006

4 WHO? All 3 – 5 year olds receiving ECSE services, including support services only

5 DECISION FACTORS? What are the decision rules in determining which environment to use when reporting each child?

6 Integrated Settings Is the child attending an early childhood program that is designed for children without disabilities and includes at least 50% non-disabled children? Head Start, Kindergarten, Reverse Mainstream Classrooms, Private preschool, LEA preschool, Childcare center Is his/her IEP implemented in that setting?

7 Reverse Mainstream Classrooms Feds now recognize Iowa is not encouraging May be appropriate but only for a VERY LIMITED TIME Research tells us that there is less social interaction in reverse integration programs which could effect childrens social/emotional skills as reflected in ECO (Guralnick & Groom, 1998)

8 Calculating Time in EC Programs % of time the child spends in a regular EC program Numerator: number of minutes per month the child spends in a regular EC program Denominator: total number of minutes per month the child spends in a regular EC program plus minutes per month spent receiving ECSE instructional and related services outside the EC program

9 Calculating Time Number of minutes per month the child spends in a regular EC program _________________________________ Number of minutes per month the child spends in a regular EC program + number of minutes per month child receives ECSE instructional & related services outside the EC program

10 TIME FACTORS 60 Minutes per Hour 5 Days per Week 20 Days per Month 4 Weeks per Month

11 A 1 Example Child is in a regular early childhood program at least 80% of the time Example: Child attends Little Lambs preschool 6 hours/week (360 minutes/wk or 1440 min/month) where his/her IEP is being implemented. Child also receives speech/language services at the local elementary school for 1 hour/week (60 min/week or 240 min/month)

12 A1 Calculation # of minutes/month in regular education: 1440 # of minutes/month receiving ECSE services: 1680 Calculate percentage: 1440÷1680=86%

13 A1 Example #2 Child attends Caring Hands Child Care Center 50 hours per week. The IEP is being implemented during the mornings – 20 hours per week (1200 min/week, 4800 min/month). The child receives speech/language services 3 hours/month (180 min/month) during the afternoon at the center.

14 A1 # 2 Calculation # of minutes per month in regular ed setting: 4980 # of minutes per month receiving ECSE services: ÷4980=1 x 100 = 100%

15 A 2 Example Child is in the regular early childhood program 40% to 70% of the time Example: Child attends ABC Preschool 7 hours/week (420 min/week and 1680 min/month) and receives special education instructional services and speech/language services in that setting. S/he also attends an LEA ECSE classroom 4 hours/week 240 min/ week, 960 min/month).

16 A2 Calculation # of minutes per month in regular education: 960 # of minutes per month receiving ECSE services: ÷1680=57%

17 A2 Example #2 Child attends Apple Tree Preschool 5 hours per week (300 min/week, 1200 min/month) where the IEP is being implemented. S/he receives speech/language services 1 hr/week (60 min/week, 240 min/month) at the local elementary school S/he receives physical therapy services 1 hr/week (60 min/week, 240 min/month) at the AEA office S/he receives occupational therapy services 1 hr/month (60 min/month) at the AEA office

18 A2 #2 Calculation # of minutes per month in regular education: 1200 # of minutes per month receiving ECSE services: ÷ 1740 = 69%

19 A 3 Example Child is in the regular early childhood program less than 40% of the time Child attends Charlie Brown Child Care Center 7 hours per week (420 min/week, 1680 min/month) where the IEP is being implemented. S/he also attends the LEA ECSE program 30 hours/week (1800 min/week, 7200 min/month). Physical therapy is offered in the home 1 hour per month (60 min/month).

20 A3 Calculation # of minutes per month in regular education: 1680 # of minutes per month receiving ECSE services: ÷8940=19%

21 A3 #2 Example The child attends a Shared Visions program 5 hours per week (300 min/week, 1200 min/month). S/he also attends the districts ECSE classroom 25 hours per week (1500 min/week, 6000 min/month). The IEP is being implemented in both settings.

22 A3 #2 Calculation # of minutes per month in regular ed: 1200 # of minutes per month receiving ECSE services: ÷6000 = 2%

23 Non-integrated Settings Does the child attend an early childhood special education program? Is that the only setting where the childs IEP is being implemented?

24 Early Childhood Special Education Programs A program that includes 51% or more children with disabilities A program that is designed for children with disabilities Examples: ECSE classroom in regular school buildings; ECSE classroom in a childcare facility, hospital, or other community based setting; separate school; and residential facilities

25 B 1 Separate class - Child attends a special education program in a class with less than 50% non-disabled children Example: Child attends the school districts ECSE classroom 30 hours/week and receives speech/language and OT services in that setting

26 B 2 Separate school - Child receives education programs in public or private day schools designed specifically for children with disabilities

27 B 3 Residential facility - Child receives education programs in publicly or privately operated residential schools or residential medical facilities on an inpatient basis

28 B 4 Home – child receives special education and related services in the principal residence of the childs family or caregivers Non-example: Child Development home where the child attends childcare

29 B 5 Service provider location – child receives all special education & related services from a service provider in the service providers location. Examples: local school building where the speech/language pathologist is officed, private clinicians offices, hospital facilities on an outpatient basis, and other public locations

30 Practice Examples for Consistency Within AEAs and Among AEAs


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