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Review of Family & Educator Survey Results Summary Presentation SAC Needs Assessment: Survey Results Board of Early Education and Care January 10, 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "Review of Family & Educator Survey Results Summary Presentation SAC Needs Assessment: Survey Results Board of Early Education and Care January 10, 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Review of Family & Educator Survey Results Summary Presentation SAC Needs Assessment: Survey Results Board of Early Education and Care January 10, 2012

2 Overview of Research Framework Survey Data to Inform Needs Assessment Page 1 SAC Needs Assessment o EEC consulted with the Wellesley College Center for Women (WCCW) to develop recommendations for the overall framework for the EEC needs assessment, including the development of logic models, sampling plan recommendations, and the content for surveys of families and educators. Surveys were just one component of a larger framework for the needs assessment o The WCCWs final report recommended two representative sample surveys to inform the needs assessment – one for families and one for educators. Also recommended use of convenience surveys to supplement data from samples o Using questions compiled from surveys implemented across the country, the WCCW research team recommended a set of survey questions for each survey organized around five research questions related to family demand and access to supports and services, family views on program quality, educator preparation and stability and educator views on quality

3 o A large majority of families report needing some type of care for their children, including 73% of families participating in the representative sample and 81% of families that completed the public version of the survey. o Out of families in sample, 36% identified a need for programs that offer care with standard week-day hours, 21% need programs that offer care before/after school, 9% need a summer-only program, 4% need a program that offers evening hours. o Of families in sample, 38% report having a child with a special need or health condition and 13% speak a language other than English at home. o Single-parent families more likely to need care in evening hours than other families (9% compared to 5%), more likely to need summer care (17% compared to 10%) and sick care (6% compared to 2%) Family Survey – Demand for Services Early Education & School-Age Programs Page 2 SAC Needs Assessment

4 o Families were mostly likely to cite the following as being very important to program quality: child safety issues, teaching children to get along with other children, communications with families, an educators positive, warm and nurturing approach, the cleanliness of the program, and the level of attention an educator provides to children. (See Attachment Family Views on Quality for Results) o Families were least likely to cite the following as being very important to program quality: the presence of children of different ages, helping families connect to other services, teaching children things about their community, having opportunities for children to participate in community activities, using a curriculum that follows state learning standards and providing children with structured activities. (See Attachment Family Views on Quality for Results) o Still finalizing variations by race/ethnicity, income and family structure Family Survey – Demand for Services Family Views on Program Quality Page 3 SAC Needs Assessment

5 o Children spend a significant amount of time in their primary care arrangement each week. Out of the families surveyed, 64% report use of more than 20 hours per week, with 38% reporting use of more than 30 hours per week. o Of the families in the sample, 68% report that they have used their current primary care arrangement for one year or longer and 32% report that they have used their arrangement less than one year. Family Survey – Access to Services & Supports Primary Early Education & Care Arrangements Page 4 SAC Needs Assessment

6 o While 70% of families indicated that they did not have any problems when searching for their primary care option, 30% reported at least one problem o Of the families that reported having a problem when searching for primary care options, 19% indicated that they found that the program was too expensive, 7% found that the the hours didnt meet my needs and 6% were unsure of the quality of the program, 5% had problems with location, 4% listed lack of info o Of the families in the survey that have a current primary care arrangement, 86% receive not financial assistance and 14 % report some type of assistance from one or more sources – e.g., public subsidy, relative or friend, tax credit, program o When searching for care, 39% of families heard about their primary care arrangement through neighbors, friends, relatives or community group, 8% CCR&R, 5% used program before, 2% welfare/social worker, 1% health care provider and 28% listed other. 70% of families would like info from EEC by Family Survey – Access to Services & Supports Challenges in Searching for Programs Page 5 SAC Needs Assessment

7 o As illustrated above, families report positively about solving family problems or disagreements but, 16% of agree or strongly agree that they would have no idea where to turn if their family needed food, housing, or had trouble making ends meet. In general, these families are less likely to speak English at home, less likely to have a college degree and likely to have lower household incomes. Family Survey – Access to Services & Supports Family Strengths in Solving Problems Page 6 SAC Needs Assessment

8 o When asked about special needs or health conditions related to their child, 62% report that their child has not been diagnosed with any of the listed conditions. Of the 38% of families that did report a child with special need or health condition, the most common conditions were: 15% Learning Disability or Developmental Delay15% Asthma 9% Food Allergies 8% ADD or ADHD 3% Autism or Pervasive Developmental Disorder 3% Emotional Disturbance 3% Other Chronic Condition 2% Orthopedic Impairment o For families that did report children with diagnosed special needs or health conditions, 81% received the diagnosis from a doctor, clinic or other health care provider, 19% from their local school district and 13% from state or local health or social service agency. Some may have received diagnoses from multiple sources. o Of the families responding, 99% of families agreed or strongly agreed that their child has regular health care checkups, 92% getting checkup within past 12 months Family Survey – Child Development Children With Special Needs or Health Conditions Page 7 SAC Needs Assessment

9 Family Survey – Child Development Reading & Books in the Home Page 8 SAC Needs Assessment

10 Family Survey – Child Development Home and Community Activities Shared with Child Page 9 SAC Needs Assessment

11 o Educators were most likely to view the following characteristics as very important to program quality: attention to child safety, demonstrating warmth toward children, the attention children receive, teaching children to get along with others, the cleanliness of the program and communicating with families about their children. (Please see attached Educator Views on Quality for details.) o Educators were least likely to view the following characteristics as very important to program quality: the presence of children of different ages, the presence of children of different ethnic groups, teaching children things about their community, the extent to which child activities are structured. o Views on quality did not vary significantly by the program setting or level of educational attainment Educator Survey – Views on Quality Responses to Questions on Program Quality Page 10 SAC Needs Assessment

12 Educator Survey – Educator Preparation & Stability Educational Attainment Page 11 SAC Needs Assessment

13 o When asked about their professional skills and abilities, educators were most likely to strongly agree with the following statements: 80% - I understand that children have different learning styles 71% - I establish respectful and productive relationships with families 64% - I understand how child development influences learning styles 62% - I am committed to continually developing practices to address the individual needs of children o When asked about their professional skills and abilities, educators were least likely to strongly agree with the following statements: 27% - I know strategies to support the learning of English language learners 38% - I receive feedback on my instructional practices and professional development from my supervisor 35% - I use community resources to foster learning 41% - I am effective in accommodating children with special needs o Educator opinions on their own skills and abilities varies by educational attainment and type of care. Those without BA less likely to select strongly agree on all items – e.g., only 4% without BA strongly agree they use community resources to foster learning compared to 63% of those with degree Educator Survey – Educator Preparation & Stability Professional Skills and Abilities Page 12 SAC Needs Assessment

14 o When asked about working with children with behavioral challenges, only 31% of educators strongly agree or agree that children with behavioral challenges are well supported in their homes. o When asked about working with children with behavioral challenges, 77% of educators feel that they are supported by their program, family child care system, or peer support group in managing children with behavioral challenges. o Of the educators responding, only 4% report that they have had to terminate or suspend children or families in their program within the past year due to behavioral challenges and 3% report that that they have had to limit the hours of participation Educator Survey – Educator Preparation & Stability Managing Challenging Behaviors Page 13 SAC Needs Assessment

15 o Of the educators in the sample, 52% report working with children who are English language learners or who have other special needs. Of those educators, 39% report working with English language learners, 23% report working with children who have special needs and 37% report working with both groups of children o Of the educators who report working with children who have special needs, 95% report that they agree or strongly agree that they are effective in adapting to accommodate the needs of children who have special needs. o Of those working with English language learners, they report speaking with children in Spanish (47%), Portuguese (9%), French 96%) and Mandarin (5%) o When asked how frequently they spoke with children in another language, 62% report that they rarely or very rarely do, 20% report sometimes and 18% report that they often or always speak with children in another language. Educator Survey – Educator Preparation & Stability Children Who Have Special Needs & English Language Learners Page 14 SAC Needs Assessment

16 o Found that families view certain research-based program features – e.g., curriculum aligned with state standards and connecting children and families to supports and services - as less important in their view of program quality. EEC may want to consider this need when engaging families to help them understand quality considerations and the connections to school achievement. o Found that 38% of families have a child with a special need or health condition and a significant number of educators may be unsure of their ability to accommodate the needs of children with special needs. EEC may want consider this need in developing strategies to support the inclusion of children with special needs. o Found that 13% of families identified speaking a language other than English at home and that a significant number of educators may be unsure of their ability to use strategies to support the learning needs of English language learners. EEC may want to consider strategies to strengthen the supports available to the programs and educators who serve English language learners. Implications for Research Questions Key Findings on Demand for Services Page 15 SAC Needs Assessment

17 o Found that 19% of families cited cost as a problem when searching for an early education program and 6% also cited quality as a problem. EEC may want to consider financial assistance strategies and incentives that help make high-quality programs more accessible to low-income families and encourage families to make selections based on program quality. o Found that 16% of families indicate that they would have no idea where to turn if their family needed food, housing, or had trouble making ends meet. EEC may want to consider this need when developing family engagement strategies for hard-to-reach families in need of services and supports o Found that 13% of families indicate speaking a language other than English at home. EEC may want to continue to translate literacy and other outreach materials and tailor outreach strategies to ensure that all families have access to literacy information and other materials in multiple languages Implications for Research Questions Key Findings on Access to Supports and Services Page 16 SAC Needs Assessment

18 o Found that 37% of families do not read to their child every day and 14% of families report that they do not read to their child at all and 9% report having less than ten books in the home. EEC may want to consider this in forming strategies to strengthen early literacy and language development and further expand efforts to engage hard-to-reach families that may not be connected to formal early education programs or community agencies. o While access to medical care for their children is high, access to other services and supports may be insufficient – e.g., 18% of families indicated that their child had not visited a dentist within the past year. EEC may want to consider this in forming strategies to facilitate access to additional supports and services that families and children may need. Implications for Research Questions Key Findings on Child Development Page 17 SAC Needs Assessment

19 o Found that educators opinions about their own professional skills and abilities, varies significantly by the type of care and even more significantly by an educators level of educational attainment. Given that only 25% of center-based educators and 13% of family child care providers have a bachelors degree in early childhood education/child development, EEC may want to continue to promote degree attainment/increased competencies. o Found that approximately 40% of the educators in the sample work with children who are English language learners and that 62% report that they rarely or very rarely speak with children in a language other than English, EEC may want to expand supports for programs and educators to assist them in developing strategies to support English language learners. Implications for Research Questions Key Findings on Educator Preparation & Stability Page 18 SAC Needs Assessment

20 o Found that more than 30% of educators report working with children who have special needs or special health condition. EEC may want to continue or expand supports to programs and educators that expand inclusive opportunities for children with special needs or disabilities. o During the past year, 7% of educators in the sample indicate that they have had to either suspend, terminate or limit the hours children or families in their program. Further, only 31% of educators strongly agree or agree that children with behavioral challenges are well supported in their homes. Given these challenges, EEC may want to continue or expand existing initiatives designed to help educators manage challenging classroom behaviors. Implications for Research Questions Key Findings on Educator Preparation & Stability Page 19 SAC Needs Assessment

21 o Educators in the sample tend to rate most of the key elements of the states QRIS as being important or very important, but some research-based features of quality – e.g., family involvement in programs, extent to which activities for children are structured, teaching children things about their community – may be viewed as less important in their view of program quality. o EEC may want to continue or expand initiatives to engage educators about the key features in the states QRIS. Implications for Research Questions Key Findings on Educator Views on Quality Page 20 SAC Needs Assessment


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