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1 14th Flying Training Wing Building the Worlds Best Pilots, Leaders, and Warriors Noncommissioned Officer Professional Enhancement I n t e g r i t y.

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Presentation on theme: "1 14th Flying Training Wing Building the Worlds Best Pilots, Leaders, and Warriors Noncommissioned Officer Professional Enhancement I n t e g r i t y."— Presentation transcript:

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2 1 14th Flying Training Wing Building the Worlds Best Pilots, Leaders, and Warriors Noncommissioned Officer Professional Enhancement I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e

3 2 WELCOME NCO Professional Enhancement

4 – 0745Introduction/Admin 0745 – 0800Welcome 0800 – 0900Enlisted Force Structure 0910 – 1010Enlisted Heritage 1020 – 1120Ethics and Core Values 1120 – 1300Lunch 1300 – 1400Senior Leadership Panel (First Sergeants) 1410 – 1510NCO Roadmap to Success 1530 – 1630PT Agenda (Day 1)

5 NCO Professional Development Enlisted Force Structure I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e Building the Worlds Best Pilots, Leaders, and Warriors

6 Enlisted Force Structure I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e NCO Professional Enhancement

7 6 Enlisted Force Structure The Philosophy: - Provide for a stable career structure - Provide opportunity for personal growth - Manage training, education, promotions - Reflect the Core Values Reorganized into 3-tier system in 1977 to facilitate professional growth throughout the enlisted ranks

8 7 Enlisted Force Structure The Purpose: - Best meets mission requirements - Provide common, stable career structure - Provides all Airmen opportunity for professional growth

9 8 Enlisted Force Structure Senior Noncommissioned Officer Tier CMSgt SMSgt MSgt Superintendent/Manager Craftsman/Supervisor/Manager Noncommissioned Officer Tier TSgt SSgt Craftsman/Supervisor Airman Tier Entry-Level SrA A1C Amn AB Journeyman/Supervisor Apprentice/Worker Apprentice

10 9 Leadership Levels Professional development and responsibilities are described in AFI , Enlisted Force Development Doctrine It is grounded in basic leadership doctrine at three levels: Tactical Operational Strategic

11 10 TACTICAL – (E1–E6) learn/perfect primary skills Honing follower-ship abilities, influencing peers and motivating subordinates Learn about themselves as leaders NOTE: To be a good leader, you MUST first learn to be a good FOLLOWER Gaining general understanding of team leadership Being assimilated into Air Force culture and adopting core values Leadership Levels

12 11 OPERATIONAL – (E7–E9) increases focus on how one team/section relates to others (big picture) Continue to develop personal leadership skills and broadening experience Develop familiarity in institutional leadership competencies Increased responsibilities and positions of authority (division/branch chiefs) This is where war fighting is executed and day- to-day command and control of Air Force operations are carried out Leadership Levels

13 12 STRATEGIC – most senior enlisted leaders assigned at these levels (key leadership positions) Leaders need tactical comprehension and competence Ability to lead Airmen and joint forces in an expeditionary environment Should embody Air Force cultural and core values Positions include MAJCOM and Air Staff level jobs Advising top leaders Managing career fields Leading far-reaching programs and processes Leadership Levels

14 13 LEADERSHIP – The art of influencing and directing people to accomplish a mission Two key points; people and the mission Leadership requires decision making (Dwight D. Eisenhower stated Decision making is the essence of leadership) Leaders are involved, hold people accountable, and set the example Leadership Definition

15 14 Be tough Get out from behind your desk Search out problems Find critical path to success Be sensitive Do not take things for granted Dont alibi Dont procrastinate Dont tolerate incompetence Be honest Leadership Advice

16 15 Enlisted Force Structure AFI , 1 December Accept and execute all duties, instructions, responsibilities and lawful orders in a timely manner. Lead subordinates and exercise effective followership in mission accomplishment. Place official duties and responsibilities ahead of personal desires …Be technically, physically, mentally and spiritually ready to accomplish the mission. Actively support AF zero tolerance policy on discrimination and sexual harassment. Be alert for people exhibiting suicidal behavior and immediately report it. Be postured to deploy. NCO Responsibilities

17 16 NCO Rank and Authority AFI para (NOTE): NCOs give orders in the exercise of their duties. A willful failure to obey these orders is a violation of the Uniform Code of Military Justice, Article 91. Also, other failures... may be offenses under UCMJ, Article 92. NCOS have apprehension authority as permitted under UCMJ, Article 7.

18 17 General NCO Responsibilities NCOs MUST: Consider professional development of their subordinates Attain and maintain skill level commensurate with their rank Secure and promote PME for themselves and subordinates Develop and maintain thorough understanding of supervisory techniques

19 18 General NCO Responsibilities Possess a thorough understanding of Air Force standards, customs, and courtesies Observe, counsel, and correct individuals regarding on- and off-duty performance, professional relationships, and personal appearance Appropriately recognize and reward Implement approved policies, directives, and programs

20 19 Specific NCO Responsibilities - - Staff Sergeants: - - Primary highly skilled technicians with supervisory and training responsibilities. - - Continuously strive to further develop as technicians, and further build supervisory competence. - - Should be given every opportunity to demonstrate leadership as they develop as leaders. - - Responsible for their subordinates and the effective accomplishment of all tasks. - - Ensure proper and effective use of all personnel and material under their control. Operates at the tactical level within a unit.

21 20 Specific NCO Responsibilities - - Technical Sergeants: - - Organizations technical experts within their specialty - Provides sound training and supervision - Responsible for development of all enlisted personnel - Obtain maximum performance from each subordinate and ensure the mission is efficiently and effectively accomplished - Must continuously strive to broaden and perfect their technical expertise and supervisory techniques. - Operates at the tactical level within a unit.

22 21 Mission Impact Enlisted Force Structure establishes the foundation from which the mission gets done Enlisted Force Structure establishes structure and responsibilities Bottom Line: If we dont fulfill our roles, the mission suffers… If we dont fulfill our roles, the mission suffers… and that weakens the defense of the United States

23 22 Summary: - Three tier system – its no accident First you learn the job Then you teach others to do the job (Mentoring!!) Finally you lead others in accomplishing the job - Take your responsibilities to heart - The Major Difference between Managers and Leaders: Managers do things right…Leaders do the right thing - The Air Force needs you to be both Enlisted Force Structure

24 23 You are a supervisor for two NCOs. Both do their job equally well. One NCO is involved in Professional Organizations, on-base and off-base activities, intra-mural sports, and the squadron booster club. The other NCO is only involved in off- duty education. Both receive PCS orders and your superintendent expects decoration nominations on both NCOs. You dont feel the latter NCO (off-duty education) meets the intent of the decoration program. How would you handle it? Scenario #1

25 24 Enlisted Force Structure Question Time… THANK YOU FOR YOUR COMMITMENT TO BEING THE BEST NCO YOU CAN BE.

26 25 Air Education and Training Command I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e Building the Worlds Best Pilots, Leaders, and Warriors Air Force Enlisted Heritage

27 26 OVERVIEW Some Enlisted Trivia Campanales Challenge Enlisted Heritage Air Force Cohesion Problem Air Force Enlisted Culture Enlisted Heritage Other Aspects of Enlisted Culture Transmitting AF Enlisted Heritage & Culture (Group Exercise) Conclusions

28 27 ENLISTED TRIVIA - 1 Congress and the President established the E-8 and E- 9 supergrades in … a.1947, as part of the National Security Act creating the USAF b.1958, in response to a steep drop in retention among armed services c.1969, to promote recruitment during the Vietnam War

29 28 ENLISTED TRIVIA - 1 Congress and the President established the E-8 and E- 9 supergrades in … a.1947, as part of the National Security Act creating the USAF b.1958, in response to a steep drop in retention among the armed services c.1969, to promote recruitment during the Vietnam War

30 29 ENLISTED TRIVIA - 1 Low pay and severe promotion stagnation at E-7 led to poor retention rates, at a time when the Soviet Unions launch of Sputnik underscored the need to retain personnel skilled in the operation and maintenance of increasingly sophisticated weapons systems. In response President Eisenhower signed Public Law , establishing the two supergrades plus a new and more generous compensation system. For the Air Force, the supergrades also provided a way to phase out its warrant officer program. The Air Force initially selected 2,000 E-7s for promotion to E-8 without regard to AFSC. Of these, 85 percent later were promoted to chief.

31 30 ENLISTED TRIVIA - 2 The Air Force claims 4 Medal of Honor recipients from World War I, 38 from World War II, 4 from the Korean War, and 13 from the Vietnam War. Of these, four from WW II and two from Vietnam were enlisted Airmen. Decorated posthumously in December 2000, Bill Pitsenbarger was the 59th Air Force recipient of the Medal of Honor.

32 31 ENLISTED TRIVIA - 3 Which CSAF began his military career as an enlisted man? a. Tony McPeak b. Carl Spaatz c. Larry Welch

33 32 ENLISTED TRIVIA - 3 Which CSAF began his military career as an enlisted man? a. Tony McPeak b. Carl Spaatz c. Larry Welch

34 33 ENLISTED TRIVIA - 3 Gen Larry Welch enlisted in the Air Force during the Korean War and later received his pilot wings and commission through the aviation cadet program. Follow-up question – Which CSAF was a Goodfellow graduate?

35 34 ENLISTED TRIVIA - 3 Gen Larry Welch enlisted in the Air Force during the Korean War and later received his pilot wings and commission through the aviation cadet program. Follow-up question – Which CSAF was a Goodfellow graduate? Gen Charles Gabriel

36 35 ENLISTED TRIVIA - 4 Who among the following was not prior enlisted? Billy Mitchell (Father strategic bombing) Jimmy Doolittle (Doolittle Raid) Eddie Rickenbacker (Top ace WWI) Nathan Twining (First Airman to Chair JCS) Stuart Symington (First SECAF) Dick Bong (Top ace WWII) Chuck Yeagar (First supersonic flight)

37 36 ENLISTED TRIVIA - 4 Who among the following was not prior enlisted? Billy Mitchell (Father strategic bombing) Jimmy Doolittle (Doolittle Raid) Eddie Rickenbacker (Top ace WWI) Nathan Twining (First Airman to Chair JCS) Stuart Symington (First SECAF) Dick Bong (Top ace WWII) Chuck Yeagar (First supersonic flight) ALL WERE PRIOR ENLISTED

38 37 ENLISTED TRIVIA - 5 In what year did the Air Force become the first US military service to provide the same basic uniform for both officers and enlisted personnel? a.1950 b.1962 c.1973

39 38 ENLISTED TRIVIA - 5 In what year did the Air Force become the first US military service to provide the same basic uniform for both officers and enlisted personnel? a.1950 b.1962 c.1973

40 39 ENLISTED TRIVIA - 5 According to the deputy chief of staff of the new Air Force in 1947, one of the morale problems facing the armed forces was that officers were permitted to wear a uniform so entirely different from that of enlisted men that a severe class line was drawn. Thus, the new Air Force elected to develop a uniform that was both distinctive and truly uniform. Implementation of the new uniform was delayed until 1950 because the Quartermaster had purchased a large stock of olive drab material before the new uniform decision was made. By September 1950, however, all personnel had at least one full set of the new uniform. At right, an Airman wearing a new blue Ike jacket in 1952.

41 40 CAMPANALES CHALLENGE CMSAF Dave Campanale, 1996 Why, in this high-tech information age, is the heritage of Air Force enlisted people not a major part of the visibly chronicled history of the US military?

42 41 CAMPANALES CHALLENGE CMSAF Dave Campanale, 1996 Why, in this high-tech information age, is the heritage of Air Force enlisted people not a major part of the visibly chronicled history of the US military? AF is 80% enlisted, but focus has been on other 20% Few photographs of enlisted from early years Few enlisted memorializations

43 42 CAMPANALES CHALLENGE CMSAF Dave Campanale, 1996 Why, in this high-tech information age, is the heritage of Air Force enlisted people not a major part of the visibly chronicled history of the US military? Challenge: Make everyone aware of the achievements of both enlisted and officers, as a reference point to say this is where weve come from.

44 43 COHESION The US Air Force has a cohesion problem. -- Former SECAF Don Rice, complaining that Airmen identified more with weapon systems than with AF

45 44 COHESION The US Air Force has a cohesion problem. -- Former SECAF Don Rice, complaining that Airmen identified more with weapon systems than with AF Loyalty within the Air Force has devolved from the larger service to individual functions, technologies, and occupations. -- Carl Builder, author

46 45 COHESION The US Air Force has a cohesion problem. -- Former SECAF Don Rice, complaining that Airmen identified more with weapon systems than with AF Loyalty within the Air Force has devolved from the larger service to individual functions, technologies, and occupations. -- Carl Builder, author Our service has a cohesion problem, and it is firmly rooted in the culture, technical specialties, and organizational dynamics within the diverse, complex entity that is todays Air Force. -- James Smith, retired AF officer

47 46 ENLISTED CULTURE Every organization has a culture, that is, a persistent, patterned way of thinking about central tasks of and human relationships within an organization. Culture is to an organization what personality is to an individual. Like human culture generally, it is passed on from one generation to the next. It changes slowly if at all. --James Wilson, Bureaucracy (1991)

48 47 ENLISTED CULTURE Every organization has a culture, that is, a persistent, patterned way of thinking about central tasks of and human relationships within an organization. Culture is to an organization what personality is to an individual. Like human culture generally, it is passed on from one generation to the next. It changes slowly if at all. --James Wilson, Bureaucracy (1991) Enlisted culture encompasses those things you find as your identity as members of the Air Force.

49 48 ENLISTED HERITAGE VALOR – TSgt Forrest Vosler

50 49 ENLISTED HERITAGE VALOR – MSgt Henry Red Erwin No one expected Erwin to survive, so the Medal of Honor was approved within hours and presented to him at the hospital in Guam.

51 50 ENLISTED HERITAGE In fact, Sergeant Erwin survived the ordeal. Released from the hospital in 1947 following reconstructive surgery, he died in 2002 at the age of 80. Starring Forrest Tucker, The Wild Blue Yonder (1951) included Erwins story as part of the film. Since 1997, the Air Force has presented the Henry E. Erwin Enlisted Aircrew Member of the Year Award.

52 51 ENLISTED HERITAGE OTHER FOOTSTEPS Sgt Vernon Burge, first enlisted pilot (1912); training of enlisted pilots continues for 30 more years (1942) Corp Frank Scott, first enlisted aviation fatality (1912) MSgt Harry Chapman, first recipient Cheney Award (1922; Roma) Enlisted engineers and gunners comprise 28 of 80 Airmen on Doolittle Raid (1942) SSgt Ben Warmer, only enlisted ace of WW II (1943) B-32 enlisted gunners shoot down last Japanese aircraft WWII (1945) Former WWII POW Paul Airey becomes first CMSAF (1967) A1C John Levitow becomes lowest ranking Airman to receive Medal of Honor (1969)

53 52 ENLISTED CULTURE Throughout its brief but eventful history the U.S. Air Force has been able to rely completely on the competence, dedication, and absolute professionalism of its enlisted force. Dick Hallion, AF Historian

54 53 ENLISTED CULTURE Throughout its brief but eventful history the U.S. Air Force has been able to rely completely on the competence, dedication, and absolute professionalism of its enlisted force. Dick Hallion, AF Historian Worked tirelessly to maintain aircraft Served on aircrews Integrated its ranks first Welcomed women more readily Today … obtains better quality of life for members and families Pursues increasingly demanding education and training

55 54 ENLISTED CULTURE Other elements of an Air Force enlisted culture …

56 55 GROUP EXERCISE As NCOs, what is your responsibility for transmitting Air Force enlisted heritage and culture to your subordinates? Should it be done? If so, how?

57 56 CONCLUSIONS Unsung Heroes: A History of the Enlisted Airmen from the Dawn of Flight to Desert Storm. Compiled and Published by Airmen Memorial Museum

58 57 I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e AIR FORCE ENLISTED HERITAGE

59 Ethics & Core Values NCO Professional Development Building the Worlds Best Pilots, Leaders, and Warriors I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e

60 59 Standards Ethics defined and dissected Core Value discussion Diversity in Ethics and Core Values Why Core Values? Core Values Strategy Summary Exercises Overview

61 60 The military culture has always held itself to a higher standard of commitment and behavior As SNCOs, you must behave in a manner that is always above reproach Youll be expected to always set the example Standards

62 61 Ethics is a study of moral philosophy Everybody has their own ethical beliefs What standards do you use to determine ethical behavior? What are some of the challenges inherit in working with individuals who hold some of the responses you mentioned? Ethics Defined

63 62 What are some of the rules (standards) that apply to Travel Benefits? Misuse of Government Travel Card Cant falsify TDY documents Cant keep gifts of monetary value Travel Benefits

64 63 What are some of the rules (standards) that apply to political activity? Cant be in uniform Cant be appointed to political office You cant solicit to support a candidate Political Activities

65 64 Air Force Core Values Integrity (First) ? Firm adherence to a code or standard (of values) Service (Before Self) ? Work done for others as an occupation Excellence (In All WE Do) ? The quality or state of excelling

66 65 What Does It Mean To You ? Integrity First ? Service, Before Self Excellence In All WE Do ?

67 66 To provide insight into the responsibilities of leadership and to start YOU thinking about the many aspects of leadership that affect Air Force units and people While mission accomplishment remains the paramount objective, leaders realize and CAPITOLIZE on the fact that the mission gets done through PEOPLE CORE VALUES, beyond definition, are a spirit and code that all Air Force members must strive to conduct their daily affairs by Core Values In-depth

68 67 Youve lived the Core Values for years--your experience is valuable What do you believe your role to be with regard to Air Force Core Values? Who do you see as your audience for mentoring on the Air Force Core Values? What is the potential impact if SNCOs fail to adhere? What happens if SNCOs fail to hold others accountable to the Core Values? Core Values-your role

69 68 We must give these issues more than lip service Can you enforce absolute standards on diverse individuals? How does the AF benefit from each of us fulfilling our SNCO obligations as they relate to Ethics and Core Values? How does diversity awareness promote Air Force Core Values? Diversity in Ethics/Core Values

70 69 Primarily four reasons: Price of admission to the Air Force itself They point to what is universal and unchanging in the profession of arms They help us get a fix on the ethical climate of the organization They serve as beacons vectoring us back to the path of professional conduct...the Core Values allow us to transform a climate of corrosion into a climate of ethical commitment. Why Core Values?

71 70 Assumptions Core Values strategy exists independently of the Chapel programs You dont need to be a commander in order to be a leader Leaders are key to moral climate Leaders must be a role model for their people Leadership comes from every level Unit members must be free to follow Core Values and encourage to discuss Looking to fix organizations, not individuals Core Values Strategy

72 71 Continuum (all parts must work together) Start educating from initial accession and continue throughout a members career Operationalizing the Core Values: Make the values an integral part of the way we conduct our daily business Top-down approach Bottom-up approach Back-and-Forth approach I would lay down my life for America, but I cannot trifle with my honor. -- Admiral John Paul Jones Core Values Strategy (cont)

73 72 Standards Ethics defined and dissected Core Value discussion Diversity in Ethics and Core Values Why Core Values? Core Values Strategy Summary Exercises Summary

74 73 Youre TDY at a conference with a co-worker. The co-worker (who outranks you) decides to slip out the last two day and site see. They ask you to take some notes for them for their trip report. How do you handle it? Scenario #1

75 74 The Superintendent of your section (a Chief) appears to have a great interest in one of your co-workers. They are often behind closed doors in his office, and recently the co-worker was nominated for a quarterly award. Some of your subordinates complain that the Superintendent is showing favoritism towards this individual. How would you handle this situation? Scenario #2

76 75 LUNCH Be back at ???

77 76 Senior Leadership Panel First Sergeants

78 NCO Roadmap to Success

79 Board Organization Chief of Staff of the Air Force Board President Two CMSgts 4 Panels Log 7 Panels Spt 4 Panels Ops 1 Panel Med

80 Eligibility Criteria Selection Opportunity Approx % of the eligibles in each AFSC Recommended by promotion authority PECD:30 Sep 04 DOR:1 Jul 03 or earlier TAFMSD: 1 Mar 95 or earlier TEMSD:1 Mar 98 or earlier Proj Ret: 1 Apr 05 or later Proj HYT Ret:Mar 05 or later

81 80 Rank Old HYTNew HYT CMSgt30 YearsUnchanged SMSgt26 Years28 Years MSgt24 Years26 Years High Year of Tenure (HYT) (Effective 1 Jan 03)

82 Past SMSgt Boards 7%6% 5%7% 8% Selection Rates10%

83 SMSgt Board Selection Statistics YRS TIGTISBOARDTOTAL StatusNBRPCTTIGTISPOINT EPRDECPFESCORE Elig16, Nonsel14, Select Cycle: 04E8

84 Records / Procedures Senior NCO selection folder Scoring scale Training session (trial run)

85 Doe, John DOE, JOHN HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES AIR FORCE SELECTION FOLDER

86 LEFT SIDE ARTICLE 15 CITATIONS FOR DECORATIONS Doe, John

87 RIGHT SIDE EPRs (last 10) AF FORM 77

88 Doe, John MISSING DOCUMENT REQUEST SNCO EVALUATION BRIEF

89 What areas are looked at? FACTOR EVALUATE Performance EPRs Professional Competence Expertise Within Specialty Leadership Supervisor / Staff Job Responsibility Scope / Exposure Breadth of Experience Where / What / When Specific Achievements Awards / Decorations /EPRs Education Level / Utilization POTENTIAL

90 89 Scoring Scale Absolutely Superior 10 Outstanding 9.5 Few Could Be Better 9 Strong 8.5 Slightly Above Average 8 Average 7.5 Slightly Below Average 7 Well Below Average 6.5 Lowest 6 Outstanding Above Average Average Below Average

91 90 Split Resolution (Technique) All panel members present All scoring stops Members gather around panel chief Panel chief reviews scores Discuss strengths and weaknesses in record Q All can look at record and discuss Q Only those involved in split may change score

92 Training Session (Trial Run) Sample group of records Score individually Open discussion during debrief Set board standard CONSISTENCY

93 Supervisory Exam100 EPRs135 Decorations 25 Time in Grade 60 Time in Service 25 Total 345 Objective Factors Factors Considered Phase One Max Points

94 93 Factors Considered Phase Two Board ScoreMax Points 450

95 94 Phase OneMax Points Objective Factors345 Supervisory Exam EPRs Decorations Time in Grade Time in Service Phase Two Board Score450 Total 795 Board Score

96 Current Promotion Policy Current Promotion Policy Promote against Air Force vacancies Equal selection opportunity for all AFSCs Best qualified and fully qualified

97 96 Disclaimer The information contained in this brief is my personal observations and does not reflect an official Air Force or Board Secretariat position. Other panel members may have a different viewpoint based on their experience on the board.

98 97 Personal Observations Individual Records Professional Military Education Education Performance Reports Decorations Awards Homesteading General Observations Closing Comments

99 98 Professional Military Education PME/SR endorsement/CCAF degree -- cornerstones to promotion Awards a big player especially with already strong record Place SNCOA award in SR block for full appreciation Sister services PME viewed same as our SNCOA

100 99 Education CCAF degree expected, absence negatively viewed CCAF degree in related specialty positively viewed Re-trainees without CCAF in new specialty negatively viewed if there was time to complete it Higher related degree favorably viewed, higher unrelated degree not necessarily viewed favorably Bachelors and/or Master degree without CCAF not well received

101 100 Performance Reports Markdowns noted especially in Leadership and Management Less than 5 rating negatively viewed, but could be overcome by consistent performance and time Job descriptions need to describe level of responsibility, number of people supervised and funds/equipment managed Must be correlation between ratings and comments Absence of SR endorsement negatively viewed

102 101 Performance Reports (cont) Raters and Additional Raters Comments SR comments carries most weight, however raters comments are also strongly considered and sometimes make the difference Dont send mixed messages – must promote to SMSgt without SR endorsement Place hard hitting comments in the SR block or towards the end of the raters comments No promotion statement on top EPR delivers clear message to the board – Dont give a high board score Wings SRs #1 sometimes got higher rating then HQ Directorate #1 due to higher numbers at wing

103 102 Performance Reports (cont) Stratification is a very valuable tool Key to promotion when properly used Honestly quantify and do the math for board, dont make them guess what your intentions are Top 15% may not help when expected promotion rate is 8%, however some stratification is better then none Group or squadron #1 beats not being anybodys #1 Effective in report sequence that reflects progression Quantify by % or # (% or # of how many/level) Stratification without validation wasted (#1 no awards) Stratifying without % or numeral possible, but you must make it clear what you want board to know (SR – without doubt the best MSgt in my wing)

104 103 Decorations MSM was the norm for a MSgt who PCSd or was qualified for extended tour decoration (3 + years) Lesser decorations, (AFCM/AFAM) were not as highly regarded as MSM for PCS or extended tour Joint decoration equal to AF decoration No decoration for PCS or extended tour negatively viewed Load achievement decorations with substantive comments to obtain subjective credit

105 104 Awards Major player -- higher the organizational level the better No award to small – work center or monthly better then none Command or Air Force awards (Qtrly/Yrly) separate member from peers and highlight technical proficiency Clarify significance of non-Air Force awards so that board can give full credit for accomplishment (community/leadership awards) Consistency in winning awards contributed to strong record Place awards in SR block and stratify accomplishment Recognition from PME

106 105 How does the board evaluate leadership? Community Activities Head of a committee Leadership role in professional military organization Leadership

107 106 General Observations A glowing SR endorsement without PME or CCAF completion was disappointing and considered to be a waste The board looked favorably on deployments, particularly when significant operational contributions were documented Serving in a SMSgt position or as an additional duty First Sgt was good providing performance examples were given Comments should be straightforward, clear and factual – avoid catchy phrases, or telling the board how to do their job Best of the best is good while one of the best is bad An individuals consistent performance and accomplishments derived from it is what gets him/her promoted Various jobs within your career field is looked upon positively Special duty assignment: career broadening

108 107 What constitutes an outstanding record? Monthly, quarterly, or annual award winner PME award winner Community/Public service recognition Civilian education awards Officer in Top 3, AFA, AFSA, etc Sustained superior performance Self-Assessment

109 108 What constitutes an above average record? Firewall 5 EPRs for last 10 reports/years Senior rater endorsement on all eligible EPRs Additional degree in career field MSM on top Documented base/community involvement Short term special duty outside of job Self-Assessment (cont)

110 109 What constitutes an average record? EPR on top has Senior Rater Indorsement SNCOA completed CCAF degree in career field Decoration with each PCS Self-Assessment (cont)

111 110 What constitutes a below average record? SNCOA not completed CCAF not completed No Senior rater indorsement No decoration upon PCS Same job description year after year Less than firewall 5 EPRs Professional degree in unrelated field (without CCAF) Home-steadying/job steadying Self-Assessment (cont)

112 111 Records Review Members must ensure they are current and accurate Ensure decorations are reflected on RIP Ensure all dates are accurate Ensure education information is accurate Correct DVR discrepancies immediately Check all pertinent information Records with errors should have been corrected before the board

113 112 Records Review Opportunities Permissive TDY to 550 C Street West, Randolph AFB, TX, Board Support Branch Call DSN for a telephonic review Fax request to DSN to receive records by mail Request records NLT 90 days prior to board convening date All requests should include name, SSAN, home address and signature

114 113 Closing Comments There is a face behind every record SMSgt is, without question, the hardest stripe to earn Each record fairly reviewed and scored Despite subjectivity, integrity is clearly built into the evaluation board process

115 114 Questions?

116 115 Physical Training Meet at Fitness Center

117 116 NCO Professional Development Building the Worlds Best Pilots, Leaders, and Warriors Personnel Programs I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e

118 Personnel Programs WHATS IN IT FOR ME?

119 Personnel Programs (cont) AssignmentsAssignments Equal PlusEqual Plus Equal O/SEqual O/S Base Of PreferenceBase Of Preference Palace ChasePalace Chase

120 119 Personnel Programs (cont) Careers Retraining Bop Entitlement Opportunity For Bonus Current Afsc Minimal Impact

121 120 Career Enhancements Promotion Opportunities -- You Control Your Destiny -- Evaluation Importance Step Reenlistments Other new programs coming on line?


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