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Slide 1 of 48 Measurements and Their Uncertainty 3.1 3.1.

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Presentation on theme: "Slide 1 of 48 Measurements and Their Uncertainty 3.1 3.1."— Presentation transcript:

1 Slide 1 of 48 Measurements and Their Uncertainty

2 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 2 of 48 Using and Expressing Measurements Bell Work What are some examples from the Real World of when you would need to take scientific measurements? 3.1

3 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 3 of Using and Expressing Measurements A measurement is a quantity that has both a number and a unit.

4 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 4 of Using and Expressing Measurements scientific notation: a coefficient and 10 raised to a power. The number of stars in a galaxy is an example of an estimate that should be expressed in scientific notation. Why?

5 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 5 of Accuracy, Precision, and Error Accuracy and Precision Accuracy is a measure of how close a measurement comes to the actual or true value of whatever is measured. To evaluate the accuracy of a measurement, the measured value must be compared to the correct value.

6 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 6 of 48 To evaluate the precision of a measurement, you must compare the values of two or more repeated measurements. Precision is a measure of how close a series of measurements are to one another.

7 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 7 of Accuracy, Precision, and Error Just because a measuring device works, you cannot assume it is accurate. The scale below has not been properly zeroed, so the reading obtained for the persons weight is inaccurate.

8 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 8 of Accuracy, Precision, and Error

9 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 9 of Accuracy, Precision, and Error Determining Error The accepted value is the correct value based on reliable references. The experimental value is the value measured in the lab. The difference between the experimental value and the accepted value is called the error.

10 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 10 of Accuracy, Precision, and Error The percent error is the absolute value of the error divided by the accepted value, multiplied by 100%.

11 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 11 of 48 Accuracy, Precision, and Error 3.1

12 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 12 of 48 Sig Figs The significant figures in a measurement include all of the digits that are known, plus a last digit that is estimated.

13 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 13 of 48 Significant Figures in Measurements Why must measurements be reported to the correct number of significant figures? 3.1

14 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 14 of 48 Significant Figures in Measurements Example: Suppose you estimate a weight that is between 2.4 lb and 2.5 lb to be 2.46 lb. The first two digits (2 and 4) are known. The last digit (6) is an estimate and involves some uncertainty. All three digits convey useful information, however, and are called significant figures. 3.1

15 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 15 of 48 Significant Figures in Measurements 3.1

16 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 16 of 48 Significant Figures in Measurements 3.1

17 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 17 of 48 Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Significant Figures in Measurements Animation 2 See how the precision of a calculated result depends on the sensitivity of the measuring instruments.

18 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 18 of 48 Significant Figures in Measurements 3.1

19 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 19 of 48

20 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 20 of 48

21 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 21 of 48 Practice Problems Problem Solving 3.2 Solve Problem 2 with the help of an interactive guided tutorial. for Conceptual Problem 3.1

22 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 22 of 48 Significant Figures in Calculations How does the precision of a calculated answer compare to the precision of the measurements used to obtain it? 3.1

23 Slide 23 of 48 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Significant Figures in Calculations A calculated answer cannot be more precise than the least precise measurement from which it was calculated. The calculated value must be rounded to make it consistent with the measurements from which it was calculated. 3.1

24 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 24 of Significant Figures in Calculations Rounding To round a number, you must first decide how many significant figures your answer should have. The answer depends on the given measurements and on the mathematical process used to arrive at the answer.

25 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 25 of

26 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 26 of

27 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 27 of

28 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 28 of 48 Practice Problems Problem Solving 3.3 Solve Problem 3 with the help of an interactive guided tutorial. for Sample Problem 3.1

29 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 29 of Significant Figures in Calculations Addition and Subtraction The answer to an addition or subtraction calculation should be rounded to the same number of decimal places (not digits) as the measurement with the least number of decimal places.

30 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 30 of

31 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 31 of

32 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 32 of

33 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 33 of 48 Practice Problems for Sample Problem 3.2 Problem Solving 3.6 Solve Problem 6 with the help of an interactive guided tutorial.

34 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Measurements and Their Uncertainty > Slide 34 of Significant Figures in Calculations Multiplication and Division In calculations involving multiplication and division, you need to round the answer to the same number of significant figures as the measurement with the least number of significant figures.

35 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 35 of

36 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall SAMPLE PROBLEM Slide 36 of

37 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 37 of 48 Practice Problems for Sample Problem 3.3 Problem Solving 3.8 Solve Problem 8 with the help of an interactive guided tutorial.

38 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 38 of 48 Section Quiz -or- Continue to: Launch: Assess students understanding of the concepts in Section 3.1. Section Assessment

39 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 39 of Section Quiz 1. In which of the following expressions is the number on the left NOT equal to the number on the right? a –8 = –11 b –8 = –6 c = d =

40 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 40 of Section Quiz 2. Which set of measurements of a 2.00-g standard is the most precise? a.2.00 g, 2.01 g, 1.98 g b.2.10 g, 2.00 g, 2.20 g c.2.02 g, 2.03 g, 2.04 g d.1.50 g, 2.00 g, 2.50 g

41 © Copyright Pearson Prentice Hall Slide 41 of A student reports the volume of a liquid as L. How many significant figures are in this measurement? a.2 b.3 c.4 d Section Quiz

42 END OF SHOW


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