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Ive come to a frightening conclusion that I am the decisive element in the classroom. Its my personal approach that creates the climate. Its my daily.

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Presentation on theme: "Ive come to a frightening conclusion that I am the decisive element in the classroom. Its my personal approach that creates the climate. Its my daily."— Presentation transcript:

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3 Ive come to a frightening conclusion that I am the decisive element in the classroom. Its my personal approach that creates the climate. Its my daily mood that makes the weather. As a teacher, I possess a tremendous power to make a child's life miserable or joyous. I can be a tool of torture or an instrument of inspiration. I can humiliate or humor, hurt or heal. In all, situations, it is my response that decides whether a crisis will be escalated or deescalated and a child humanized or dehumanized. Haim Ginott (1922–1973, teacher and child psychologist)

4 Appreciative Inquiry

5 Discovering The best of what is Appreciating Dream What might be Envisioning Results Design What should be our ideal? Co- constructing Destiny How to empower, learn, adjust and improvise Sustaining Discovery- Articulating strengths and best practices. Identifying the best of what has been and what is. Dream- Creating a clear, results-oriented vision through focus on a higher purpose. Design- Creating the possibility of the ideal; to realize the expressed dream. Destiny- Strengthening positive capability to build hope and sustain momentum for ongoing positive change and high performance. Appreciative Inquiry

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8 Principle One: Always Empower, Never Disempower Students affected by trauma often compete with their teachers for power. This is because they believe that controlling their environment is the way to achieve safety (Craig, 1992).

9 Principle Two: Provide Unconditional Positive Regard Traumatic events make it difficult for children to trust. They make it difficult to feel worthy, take initiative, and form relationships. Students struggling with trauma dont need another adult to tell them what is wrong with them. What they do need, what helps them thrive, is an adult who treats them with simple sustained kindness, an adult who can empathize with the challenges they face moving between home and school.

10 Principle Three: Maintain High Expectations Teachers may be so concerned about disempowering their students that they may be hesitant to set limits. As a consequence, expectations for achievement are lowered. Doing so inadvertently sends negative messages such as you are too damaged to behave or you are different than others so I am giving up on you. Note that these messages can increase the perception of the student that they are powerless. Increased feelings of powerlessness lead to increased symptoms of traumatic affect.

11 Principle Four: Check Assumptions, Observe and Question Traumatic events can affect any person, family or group of people. When we make assumptions about who is likely to be traumatized based on a stereotype of any one group of people, this may stop us from seeing who actually has been affected by trauma. 1)Identify Assumptions. 2)Observe. 3)Ask Questions; and 4)Listen.

12 Principle Five: Be a Relationship Coach Compassionate teachers think of themselves as relationship coaches. After all, the relationships we establish with and among students influence the tone and demeanor in our classrooms.

13 Principle Six: Provide Guided Opportunities for Helpful Participation Meaningful participation gives us opportunities to be heard, to make choices, to have responsibilities, to belong, and to engage in problem solving. When we make meaningful contributions to the welfare of others, we improve our own feelings of self- worth. Helping others strengthens resiliency. Providing guided opportunities for participation is an important principle of compassionate teaching. Such supervised opportunities can provide solace, create mutual trust, and affirm the self-worth of those involved.

14 Teachers can do a great deal to create a climate of safety for their students. They can respond to the emotions that underlie inappropriate behavior rather than simply react to the most disturbing symptoms. Important Elements 1)consistency and integrity on the part of the teacher, 2)attunement on the part of the student so they can read teacher cues accurately, and 3)opportunities to respond appropriately. Teachers can do a great deal to create a climate of safety for their students. They can respond to the emotions that underlie inappropriate behavior rather than simply react to the most disturbing symptoms. Important Elements 1)consistency and integrity on the part of the teacher, 2)attunement on the part of the student so they can read teacher cues accurately, and 3)opportunities to respond appropriately. DOMAIN ONE: SAFETY CONNECTION AND ASSURANCE

15 Students will be provided with opportunities to feel safe and assured. Students will be able to identify triggers that set off fight- flight-fright behaviors that distract them from learning. With the help of their teachers, students will either remove trigger stimuli or respond to those stimuli differently. Students will improve their abilities to attune themselves to the cues of others. Students will be provided with opportunities to feel safe and assured. Students will be able to identify triggers that set off fight- flight-fright behaviors that distract them from learning. With the help of their teachers, students will either remove trigger stimuli or respond to those stimuli differently. Students will improve their abilities to attune themselves to the cues of others. DOMAIN ONE: SAFETY CONNECTION AND ASSURANCE Goals for Instruction

16 1.What was the function of the students behavior. Was it to defy us or was its intent to somehow cope with a perceived danger? 2. Acknowledging and respecting boundaries. Knowing all the details is not the most useful way to use our energy. 3.Triggers can be external, internal, or a combination of both. Their response is reflexive not reflective. 4. Provide the student with choices. a) Remove the stimulus, b) Help the student remove the stimulus, or c) Help the student learn to respond to the stimulus differently. 6. Compassionate strategies for traumatized students tend to be useful for all students. Identifying Triggers

17 Naming the rationale for the limit. (e.g., Throwing pens at people can hurt people). Link the consequence to the behavior, not the person. (e.g., I care about you. I dont think you wanted to hurt anyone. But throwing is not okay). Naming the boundaries of the limit. (e.g., You have a 5 minute time out, or, Im going to hold your pen until after lunch). Move on. The limit has been set. Consequence given. (e.g., After your time out you may look at your book, or clean your desk). Make adaptations. (e.g., If, in the past, a child has been punished by being isolated for long periods of time, have the student sit in a nearby chair. Dont send them to another room). Kinniburgh & Blaustein (2005)p A3-18 Minimizing Triggers when Setting Limits

18 Domain two addresses ways that students can recognize and name their feelings and bodily states, otherwise known as the vocabulary of feelings. Once students recognize and name their feelings, the objective is to help them create links between external experiences, internal feelings, and triggered behaviors. Students still need to learn how to respond differently to their feelings. Doing so requires affect modulation. Domain two addresses ways that students can recognize and name their feelings and bodily states, otherwise known as the vocabulary of feelings. Once students recognize and name their feelings, the objective is to help them create links between external experiences, internal feelings, and triggered behaviors. Students still need to learn how to respond differently to their feelings. Doing so requires affect modulation. DOMAIN TWO: IMPROVING EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL SELF-REGULATION

19 Students will be able to better identify and differentiate among their feelings. Students will be able to better identify the emotional needs of others. Students will be able to better link their feelings with internal and external experiences. Students will be able to better identify resources to safely express their feelings. Students will be able to better use strategies to modulate their responses to emotions in ways that will support academic success. Students will be able to use what they have learned about modulating their feelings to behave in a manner appropriate to the classroom setting. Students will be able to return to a comfortable emotional state after arousal of their emotions. Students will be able to better identify and differentiate among their feelings. Students will be able to better identify the emotional needs of others. Students will be able to better link their feelings with internal and external experiences. Students will be able to better identify resources to safely express their feelings. Students will be able to better use strategies to modulate their responses to emotions in ways that will support academic success. Students will be able to use what they have learned about modulating their feelings to behave in a manner appropriate to the classroom setting. Students will be able to return to a comfortable emotional state after arousal of their emotions. DOMAIN TWO: IMPROVING EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL SELF-REGULATION Goals for Instruction

20 Personal agency is the term used to describe the belief that one can make things happen. Social skills are needed for students to interact with others in acceptable ways. Executive functions are those skills that enable a person to behave in goal-directed ways. Academic Skills: Children affected by traumatic events can have trouble analyzing ideas, organizing narrative material, or seeing cause- and-effect relationships. Personal agency is the term used to describe the belief that one can make things happen. Social skills are needed for students to interact with others in acceptable ways. Executive functions are those skills that enable a person to behave in goal-directed ways. Academic Skills: Children affected by traumatic events can have trouble analyzing ideas, organizing narrative material, or seeing cause- and-effect relationships. DOMAIN THREE: COMPETENCIES OF PERSONAL AGENCY, SOCIAL SKILLS AND ACADEMIC SKILLS

21 Students will be able to demonstrate the assertiveness skills needed to originate and direct their behavior towards goals they have chosen. Students will demonstrate improved abilities to interact with others in socially acceptable ways. Through the use of explicit learning strategies, students will demonstrate the ability to use cognitive skills to succeed in academic learning. Students will demonstrate the use of executive functions (e.g., anticipate consequences, make decisions and evaluate results) in daily classroom work. Students will be able to demonstrate the assertiveness skills needed to originate and direct their behavior towards goals they have chosen. Students will demonstrate improved abilities to interact with others in socially acceptable ways. Through the use of explicit learning strategies, students will demonstrate the ability to use cognitive skills to succeed in academic learning. Students will demonstrate the use of executive functions (e.g., anticipate consequences, make decisions and evaluate results) in daily classroom work. DOMAIN THREE: COMPETENCIES OF PERSONAL AGENCY, SOCIAL SKILLS AND ACADEMIC SKILLS Goals for Instruction

22 Students will be able to demonstrate the assertiveness skills needed to originate and direct their behavior towards goals they have chosen. Students will demonstrate improved abilities to interact with others in socially acceptable ways. Through the use of explicit learning strategies, students will demonstrate the ability to use cognitive skills to succeed in academic learning. Students will demonstrate the use of executive functions (e.g., anticipate consequences, make decisions and evaluate results) in daily classroom work. Students will be able to demonstrate the assertiveness skills needed to originate and direct their behavior towards goals they have chosen. Students will demonstrate improved abilities to interact with others in socially acceptable ways. Through the use of explicit learning strategies, students will demonstrate the ability to use cognitive skills to succeed in academic learning. Students will demonstrate the use of executive functions (e.g., anticipate consequences, make decisions and evaluate results) in daily classroom work. DOMAIN THREE: COMPETENCIES OF PERSONAL AGENCY, SOCIAL SKILLS AND ACADEMIC SKILLS Goals for Instruction

23 Students will be able to demonstrate the assertiveness skills needed to originate and direct their behavior towards goals they have chosen. Students will demonstrate improved abilities to interact with others in socially acceptable ways. Through the use of explicit learning strategies, students will demonstrate the ability to use cognitive skills to succeed in academic learning. Students will demonstrate the use of executive functions (e.g., anticipate consequences, make decisions and evaluate results) in daily classroom work. Students will be able to demonstrate the assertiveness skills needed to originate and direct their behavior towards goals they have chosen. Students will demonstrate improved abilities to interact with others in socially acceptable ways. Through the use of explicit learning strategies, students will demonstrate the ability to use cognitive skills to succeed in academic learning. Students will demonstrate the use of executive functions (e.g., anticipate consequences, make decisions and evaluate results) in daily classroom work. DOMAIN THREE: COMPETENCIES OF PERSONAL AGENCY, SOCIAL SKILLS AND ACADEMIC SKILLS Goals for Instruction

24 Students will be able to demonstrate the assertiveness skills needed to originate and direct their behavior towards goals they have chosen. Students will demonstrate improved abilities to interact with others in socially acceptable ways. Through the use of explicit learning strategies, students will demonstrate the ability to use cognitive skills to succeed in academic learning. Students will demonstrate the use of executive functions (e.g., anticipate consequences, make decisions and evaluate results) in daily classroom work. Students will be able to demonstrate the assertiveness skills needed to originate and direct their behavior towards goals they have chosen. Students will demonstrate improved abilities to interact with others in socially acceptable ways. Through the use of explicit learning strategies, students will demonstrate the ability to use cognitive skills to succeed in academic learning. Students will demonstrate the use of executive functions (e.g., anticipate consequences, make decisions and evaluate results) in daily classroom work. DOMAIN THREE: COMPETENCIES OF PERSONAL AGENCY, SOCIAL SKILLS AND ACADEMIC SKILLS Goals for Instruction

25 Students will be able to demonstrate the assertiveness skills needed to originate and direct their behavior towards goals they have chosen. Students will demonstrate improved abilities to interact with others in socially acceptable ways. Through the use of explicit learning strategies, students will demonstrate the ability to use cognitive skills to succeed in academic learning. Students will demonstrate the use of executive functions (e.g., anticipate consequences, make decisions and evaluate results) in daily classroom work. Students will be able to demonstrate the assertiveness skills needed to originate and direct their behavior towards goals they have chosen. Students will demonstrate improved abilities to interact with others in socially acceptable ways. Through the use of explicit learning strategies, students will demonstrate the ability to use cognitive skills to succeed in academic learning. Students will demonstrate the use of executive functions (e.g., anticipate consequences, make decisions and evaluate results) in daily classroom work. DOMAIN THREE: COMPETENCIES OF PERSONAL AGENCY, SOCIAL SKILLS AND ACADEMIC SKILLS Goals for Instruction

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27 The Heart of Learning and Teaching: Compassion, Resiliency, and Academic Success Contact Ron Hertel, Program Supervisor Office Superintendent of Public Instruction Phone: 360-725-4968 Email: Ron.Hertel@k12.wa.usRon.Hertel@k12.wa.us


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