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Leadership Curriculum Module SREB Learning-Centered Leadership Program The Wallace Foundation 2008/2009 Assessing Academic Rigor to Ensure Grade- Level.

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Presentation on theme: "Leadership Curriculum Module SREB Learning-Centered Leadership Program The Wallace Foundation 2008/2009 Assessing Academic Rigor to Ensure Grade- Level."— Presentation transcript:

1 Leadership Curriculum Module SREB Learning-Centered Leadership Program The Wallace Foundation 2008/2009 Assessing Academic Rigor to Ensure Grade- Level Proficiency and College Readiness Day Three October 6, 2009 West Virginia State Workshop Series Bridgeport Convention Center Clarksburg, West Virginia 1

2 Do Now! Assessing Academic Rigor 2 2

3 Workshop Goal Facilitate school staff in a collaborative effort of academic press to measure and increase classroom rigor in instruction, assessments and objectives, in order to meet the demands of continued education and, ultimately, college or the workplace. Assessing Academic Rigor 3 3

4 Housekeeping Phone calls Texting, emails Restrooms Breaks Lunch Punctuality Sharing Rule of Two Feet! Assessing Academic Rigor 4 4

5 Ask It Basket Assessing Academic Rigor 5

6 Norms Listen with an open mind. Work toward solutions. Meet commitments or let others know if you are struggling to do so. Embrace change when appropriate. Respect confidentiality. Assessing Academic Rigor 6 6

7 Flip Chart Strategy Literacy Note-taking Organization Relationship Building

8 Flip Chart Contents YOUR NAME CHOOSE TWO : Family Education Work experience Hobbies/interests Clubs/organizations My Hero Favorites (vacations, music, books, etc.) What I want to be when I grow up Something funny about yourself An interesting experience from your job Other (your choice)

9 Flip Chart Contents SELECT TWO FOR REVIEW: One or more of the eight dimensions of the SREB rigor rubric with some of its indicators for implementation One or more of the dimensions of the Revised Blooms Taxonomy, with some of the description s(or some of the 19 gerunds) The usefulness or value of the RBT for teachers College readiness –definition and/or measures of college-readiness (especially those described by Conley) Other (your choice of something else you learned in the June workshop that you think is important to remember)

10 Flip Chart Strategy: Team Share Introduce yourself to your own school team with one interesting tidbit Talk about ways to use flip charts in the classroom

11 Days One and Two Overview Understanding & Applying a Definition of Rigor Day One: – Introduction and Overview – What is Rigor, and Why Should We Care? – Building Schoolwide Academic Press and Rigor – Monitoring Schoolwide Rigor: The Rigor Rubric and Dashboard – Understanding the Revised Blooms Taxonomy Day Two: – Applying the Revised Blooms Taxonomy: Alignment – Examining Classroom Practices – Homework: Take the learning back to your whole school; gather data and implement a project of your choosing for increasing schoolwide or classroom rigor. Assessing Academic Rigor 11 Assessing Academic Rigor11

12 Day Three Overview Analyzing Rigor in Our Classrooms School Team Presentations: Building Schoolwide and Classroom Rigor Applying the Revised Blooms Taxonomy for Increasing Rigor at the Classroom Level Aligning Units and Activities Using the Revised Blooms Taxonomy Using a Collaborative Process with the Revised Blooms Taxonomy Homework: Develop and implement a unit of study of your choosing, aligned along the Revised Blooms Taxonomy for increasing rigor at the classroom level and bring it with you to the Day Four workshop. Assessing Academic Rigor 12 Assessing Academic Rigor12

13 Day Four Overview Sustaining Our Progress Sharing Our Progress and Future Challenges Debriefing with Other School Teams Peer Review of Sample Units for Level of Rigor Sharing and Extending the Work What Have We Learned? Action Planning Assessing Academic Rigor 13 Assessing Academic Rigor13

14 Remember: Cycle of Low Achievement Assessing Academic Rigor 14 Assessing Academic Rigor14 Low Expectations Low Level Assignments/ Instruction Poor Test Results Less Challenging Courses

15 Remember: Definition of Rigor Rigor is the expectation that students will be able to perform at levels of cognitive complexity necessary for proficiency at each grade level, and readiness for college and the workplace.. Assessing Academic Rigor SREB

16 16 Remember: Dimensions of the SREB Rigor Rubric Assessment for Learning Collaboration Coursetaking Patterns Curriculum Coherence Expectations for Student Work Grading Practices Instructional Strategies Student Support Assessing Academic Rigor

17 Two Dimensions of the RBT Assessing Academic Rigor17 D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1 D. Metacog- nitive Knowledge C6 C5 C4 C3 C2 C1 C. Procedural Knowledge B6 B5 B4 B3 B2 B1 B. Conceptual Knowledge A6 A5 A4 A3 A2 A1 A. Factual Knowledge 1. REMEMBER Recognizing Recalling 2. UNDERSTAND Interpreting Exemplifying Classifying Summarizing Inferring Comparing Explaining 3. APPLY Executing Implementing 4. ANALYZE Differentiating Organizing Attributing 5. EVALUATE Checking Critiquing 6. CREATE Generating Planning Producing

18 18 Rigor & Alignment Alignment of instruction and assessment with standards/objectives that are at those levels of cognitive complexity is a critical part of increasing rigor in schools. But---all too often---the gap between the levels of cognitive complexity in the standards and the levels in assignments increases as students progress through grade levels. Assessing Academic Rigor SREB

19 Team Presentations Description of project: Goals, activities, rationale, considerations Findings: +/-, obstacles Learning points: Team, individuals Next steps What do you think other schools can learn from your experience? Assessing Academic Rigor 19 Assessing Academic Rigor19

20 Team Presentations - Feedback Protocol Praise: Ideas that are promising; positive feedback Question: Questions to clarify or expand upon something Polish: Suggestions and ideas for consideration (may be posed in the form of questions) Use planner page 9 and Notes page (p. 32) Assessing Academic Rigor 20 Assessing Academic Rigor20

21 21 BREAK SREB

22 Review Activity: Using the Revised Blooms Taxonomy Decide the RBT code for the objectives, the activities and the assessment of the economics unit Money: Kids and Cash. Planner pages 9-11

23 Two Dimensions of the RBT Assessing Academic Rigor23 D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1 D. Metacog- nitive Knowledge C6 C5 C4 C3 C2 C1 C. Procedural Knowledge B6 B5 B4 B3 B2 B1 B. Conceptual Knowledge A6 A5 A4 A3 A2 A1 A. Factual Knowledge 1. REMEMBER Recognizing Recalling 2. UNDERSTAND Interpreting Exemplifying Classifying Summarizing Inferring Comparing Explaining 3. APPLY Executing Implementing 4. ANALYZE Differentiating Organizing Attributing 5. EVALUATE Checking Critiquing 6. CREATE Generating Planning Producing

24 24 Evaluating Alignment - Algebra Unit 1.Use the poster-sized taxonomy matrix and pages 12-13 in your planner. 2.Review Algebra Unit (Handout) 3.Write the number of each element on a color- coded sticky note. 4.Determine correct RBT cell for each element and place note on the RBT poster. 5.Discuss follow-up questions on page 14. 6.Be prepared to share out your ideas on how to improve the alignment and level of rigor of the unit. Assessing Academic Rigor SREB

25 25 Algebra Unit Follow-up Questions 1.Look at the overall alignment of the elements in this Algebra Unit. How would you rate the alignment? Strong or weak? Why? 2.What advice would you give this teacher for improving the alignment and level of rigor of this unit? 3.How could this alignment activity be used/adapted as a professional development activity during common planning time back in your schools? SREB

26 26 LUNCH SREB

27 27 Using Collaborative Protocols What is a protocol? A structured process with clear goals and steps---like the one you just used. See planner p. 15-21. Lets take a deeper look at one collaborative protocol: the tuning protocol (planner p. 22- 23). Next lets model the tuning protocol and the RBT as a tool for reviewing a lesson plan. SREB

28 Protocols for Looking at Teacher Assignments and Student Work A protocol consists of agreed upon guidelines for a conversation, and it is the existence of this structure -- which everyone understands and has agreed to -- that permits a certain kind of conversation to occur -- often a kind of conversation which people are not in the habit of having. Protocols are vehicles for building the skills and culture necessary for collaborative work. Thus, using protocols often allows groups to build trust by actually doing substantive work together.

29 Popular Protocols http://www.lasw.org/methods.html Art Shack ATLAS Learning from Student Work Charrette Collaborative Assessment Conference Constructivist Protocol Consultancy Describing Students' Work Slice Standards in Practice Tuning Protocol

30 Standards in Practice Standards in Practice (SIP) has been developed by the Education Trust as a "quality control tool" for analyzing and improving the quality of instruction provided to students. The SIP process is typically used, in bi-monthly meetings of small teams of teachers, guidance counselors, parents.Education Trust The process calls for a close examination of teachers' assignments and student work against a relevant standard or set of standards.

31 The Tuning Protocol The Tuning Protocol was developed by the Coalition of Essential Schools as a means of providing teachers feedback on the authentic assessment systems they were engaged in developing. Coalition of Essential Schools

32 The Tuning Protocol A teacher, or team of teachers, presents samples of student work and the context for the work (assignment, rubric) and a focusing question about which he or she would especially welcome discussion.

33 The Tuning Protocol After carefully reviewing the work, participants provide "warm" and "cool" feedback on the work while the presenter listens in silence, who then reflects on what she's heard. The Tuning Protocol may be facilitated by someone from inside or outside the group using it.

34 Raising Expectations for Teacher Assignments Question levels Types of activities Essential questions Ties to standards Reflection

35 35 BREAK SREB

36 36 Using Collaborative Protocols Next lets practice the tuning protocol and the RBT as a tool to review a lesson plan. Planner pages 24-26 Discuss what the group learned about using the protocol. Discuss what the group learned about raising the rigor of activities. SREB

37 How to expand the protocol: Evaluating your students performance Share the assignment and scoring guide. Distribute papers. Use the tuning protocol with both the assignment and the student work. Discuss what the group learned about student performance.

38 Do your teachers all understand proficiency? How can you replicate this process in your school?

39 Action Planning How will you engage the entire staff? What strategies will you try first? Next? How will you inform people? Get people organized? What is your action plan for the next month, before the next session in December? What will be your action plan for the rest of the school year?

40 Homework between Days Three and Four Practice using the taxonomy on some standards. Create your own case studies. Individually, develop a unit related to one or more of the analyzed standards. As a leadership team support each other using the tuning protocol to give each other feedback. Bring the case study materials to the December session. See planner page 29.

41 Exit Tickets Assessing Academic Rigor 41


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