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8-1 Chapter 8: Recommended Early Literacy Practices ©2012 California Department of Education, Child Development Division with WestEd Center for Child &

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Presentation on theme: "8-1 Chapter 8: Recommended Early Literacy Practices ©2012 California Department of Education, Child Development Division with WestEd Center for Child &"— Presentation transcript:

1 8-1 Chapter 8: Recommended Early Literacy Practices ©2012 California Department of Education, Child Development Division with WestEd Center for Child & Family Studies (07/2012)

2 8-2 Training Outcomes Define early literacy Identify connections with CA Preschool Learning Foundations Consider the role of the family Explore strategies for promoting English literacy development

3 ©2012 California Department of Education, Child Development Division with WestEd Center for Child & Family Studies (07/2012) 8-3 Early Literacy The gradual and ongoing process of learning to understand and use language that begins at birth and continues through the early childhood years. During this period children first learn to use oral forms of language-listening and speaking-and then begin to explore and make sense of written forms-reading and writing. Koralek, D. & Collins, R. (1997). On the road to reading: A guide for community partners. Vienna, VA: The Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, p.10.

4 ©2012 California Department of Education, Child Development Division with WestEd Center for Child & Family Studies (07/2012) 8-4 Get Em Together

5 ©2012 California Department of Education, Child Development Division with WestEd Center for Child & Family Studies (07/2012) 8-5 English Language Development Foundations: Listening & Speaking Listening with Understanding Beginning words Requests and directions Basic and advanced concepts PLF, Vol. 1, pp Speaking Communication of needs Vocabulary production Conversation Utterance length and complexity Grammar Inquiry Social conventions Narrative development PLF, Vol. 1, pp

6 ©2012 California Department of Education, Child Development Division with WestEd Center for Child & Family Studies (07/2012) 8-6 English Language Development Foundations: Reading Participate in read-aloud activity Interest in books and reading Personal connections to the story Story structure Book handling Environmental print Letter awareness Letter recognition Rhyming Onset Sound differences in the home language and English PLF, Vol. 1, pp

7 8-7 English Language Development Foundations: Writing Writing as communication Writing to represent words or ideas Writing their name PCF, Vol. 1, pp ©2012 California Department of Education, Child Development Division with WestEd Center for Child & Family Studies (07/2012)

8 8-8 Intentional teaching requires an ongoing awareness of the home language development of each child as well as the English learners ability to use English in activities… PCF, Vol. 1, p ©2012 California Department of Education, Child Development Division with WestEd Center for Child & Family Studies (07/2012)

9 8-9 Principle One The education of English learners is enhanced when preschool programs and families form meaningful partnerships. PEL Resource Guide, Second Edition, p.16 ©2012 California Department of Education, Child Development Division with WestEd Center for Child & Family Studies (07/2012)

10 8-10 Connecting Home and School Literacy Practices Principle Nine: Engaging in multiple literacy practices, such as reading books, singing songs, and reading poetry, is part of the daily life of most families. PEL Resource Guide, Second Edition, p.73 Handout 8C: Identifying the Early Literacy Skills Found in Songs, Books, and Rhymes Used by Families

11 8-11 Principle Ten Offering a variety of opportunities for children to explore written materials and their meanings, as well as the sounds of spoken language through rhyme and alliteration, builds the language and literacy skills of preschool English learners. PEL Resource Guide, Second Edition, p.84 ©2012 California Department of Education, Child Development Division with WestEd Center for Child & Family Studies (07/2012)

12 8-12 Moving Toward Literacy Video

13 ©2012 California Department of Education, Child Development Division with WestEd Center for Child & Family Studies (07/2012) 8-13 Key Points Children need a well-developed base of oral language skills, including an extensive vocabulary, in order to become successful readers. Children who have positive and repeated experiences with print tend to be better readers.

14 ©2012 California Department of Education, Child Development Division with WestEd Center for Child & Family Studies (07/2012) 8-14 Key Points (continued) Children who are stronger in a language other than English often have some of the foundational skills of literacy in their home language. Many of the early literacy skills children have in their home language will transfer to reading in English when a child is ready to make that transition.

15 ©2012 California Department of Education, Child Development Division with WestEd Center for Child & Family Studies (07/2012) 8-15 Key Points (continued) Research shows that introducing phonological awareness, print awareness, and letter knowledge in brief, interactive, engaging, and multi-sensory activities builds young childrens early literacy skills.

16 ©2012 California Department of Education, Child Development Division with WestEd Center for Child & Family Studies (07/2012) 8-16 Reflection Turn to page 88 in the PEL Resource Guide and take the time to answer question 3 on your Reflection handout: - Which strategies for becoming familiar with the literacy practices of the families of the children in my class have I implemented? What new strategies would I like to try?


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