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Report to JCOMM 4 Successes, Lessons Learned and the Way Forward Peter Dexter Co-President of JCOMM for Meteorology JOINT WMO/IOC TECHNICAL COMMISSION.

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Presentation on theme: "Report to JCOMM 4 Successes, Lessons Learned and the Way Forward Peter Dexter Co-President of JCOMM for Meteorology JOINT WMO/IOC TECHNICAL COMMISSION."— Presentation transcript:

1 Report to JCOMM 4 Successes, Lessons Learned and the Way Forward Peter Dexter Co-President of JCOMM for Meteorology JOINT WMO/IOC TECHNICAL COMMISSION FOR OCEANOGRAPHY AND MARINE METEOROLOGY

2 Marine Meteorological and Oceanographic Services Operational oceanography now a reality Community welfare, socio-economic impacts, hazard mitigation, climate change, marine environment, GFCS…. National and international cooperation essential (IOC, WMO, met and ocean agencies) : JCOMM as the bridge Atmosphere Ocean Climate Services Marine Weather Services Weather Services Oceanographic Services Ocean Climate Services

3 Marine Meteorological & Oceanographic Services, Deliverables FeedbackSupportCollaboration

4 Deliverables Collaboration Support Deliverables Collaboration Reporting Deliverables Strategies Objectives Requirements Funding Requirements Collaboration Internal Partners (WMO & IOC) Technical Commissions & Committees Regional Bodies Programmes Requirements Collaboration Data / Info External Partners (e.g. IMO, SCOR, POGO) Requirements Bodies Science Bodies Projects & Programmes User Peak Bodies Management & Guidance/Review Coordination for Implementation

5 Deliverables Collaboration Support Deliverables Collaboration Reporting Deliverables Strategies Objectives Requirements Funding Requirements Collaboration Internal Partners (WMO & IOC) Technical Commissions & Committees Regional Bodies Programmes Requirements Collaboration Data / Info External Partners (e.g. IMO, SCOR, POGO) Requirements Bodies Science Bodies Projects & Programmes User Peak Bodies Management & Guidance/Review Coordination for Implementation FeedbackSupportCollaboration Deliverables Data & Services Capacity Development

6 JCOMM Programme Areas

7 100% 59% 80% 62% 73% 34%48% 100% Original goal: 100% implementation in 2010 System % complete In situ Networks Status: 62% as of April 2011

8 In situ observations: priorities Provide a more uniform geographical coverage with ARGO floats and surface drifters Maintain the VOS fleet, which tends to decrease Extend the GLOSS station network reporting sea level data in real time including the tide gauges recently established in the Africa region A focus on the advances in Ocean Observing Technology Establishment of a network of Regional Marine Instrument Centres (RMIC)

9 Observations: deliverables & challenges Pilot projects –Wave measurement intercomparisons –Low-cost wave buoy technology development –Enhanced capacity and reduced cost for marine telecommunications –Capacity building workshops Regional Marine Instrument Centres –Enhanced national & regional capabilities in marine instrumentation and maintenance Participation in WIGOS –Delivery of all marine/ocean data to WIS –Standards and best practices in marine observation

10 PANGEA concept focusing on the Western Indian Ocean region (3 in-region Capacity Building workshops organized since JCOMM- III) Proposed moored buoys 12-STI832

11 Analysis in frequency domain for directional estimates when applicable Pilot Activities undertaken, e.g. DBCP-ETWS Pilot Project on Wave Measurement Evaluation and Testing (PP-WET)

12 JCOMMOPS is involved with the implementation of the main global (in-situ) observing systems, including: –DBCP (data buoy cooperation panel): Drifting and moored buoys in the high seas and tropical moorings, tsunameters and misc. fixed platforms. –Argo: Profiling floats –SOT (ship observations team) : SOOP (XBTs, TSGs), ASAP atmospheric soundings, VOS meteorological observations –OceanSITES: Deep ocean time-series reference stations –Next Step: costal/regional systems (gliders, polar, marine mammals, etc) JCOMMOPS is firmly established as a major support facility for operational ocean observing systems providing Monitoring, Assistance, international and technical Coordination to Argo, DBCP, SOT and OceanSITES programmes

13 13 #1 Lady Amber: Private charter AST 12 AST 13 The Lady Amber Story, A year in the Indian Ocean promoting Argo and JCOMM

14 JCOMMOPS is rounding a new cape by strengthening its support to the 4 programmes: -integrating its core deliverables and services, -developing light operational capacities, and - working with France and Member States,and ocean community (including industry) to increase financial means. Complete Report at JCOMM-5

15 Data Management Priorities Maintaining data flow to the WIS through the JCOMM Pilot Project for WIGOS and the Oceans Data Portal, in conjunction with IODE Introducing standards and best practices in ocean data management (an online catalogue Modernizing the marine climatological data management and services process.

16 MCDS Marine Climate Data Flow Vision for 2020 Data Acquisition Centres (DACs) Global Data Assembly Centres (GDACs) Centres for Marine-Meteorological & Oceanographic Climate Data (CMOCs) DM-DAC RT-DAC DM-DAC RT-DAC GDAC CMOC RT-DAC Data Sources (RT, DM) WMO Information System (WIS) IODE Ocean Data Portal (ODP) JCOMM User interface Data QC info. Data QC info. Data rescue

17 Data Management: Main Achievements Contribution to WIS & WIGOS –Ocean Data Portal : –Standards development: Next Actions –Interoperability between ocean data systems (e.g. ODP, SeaDataNET, IMOS, OBIS) –Issue: Finding experts to conduct the standards proposals review

18 Technology Transfer & Capacity Development Workshops –Use and applications of in situ marine platforms, especially drifting & moored buoys –For PMOs, on ship recruitment, low-cost instrumentation, and data applications Education and Training through –IODE facilities –IODE Regional Ocean Data Information Networks (ODINs) –Technology Transfer and Implementation Support for Ocean Data Portal Next Actions –New Cookbook for submitting data in Real-Time & Delayed mode to facilitate data exchange

19 Services and Forecast Systems: priorities Enhanced efforts for ocean forecasting system development, including finalization of the Guide to Operational Ocean Forecast Systems Development of tools and capabilities to assess and forecast coastal inundation from combined storm surge, wave and river flooding events Strengthening of five new METAREAS in the Arctic Further development of e-Navigation input

20 Services and Forecast Systems Maritime safety –Highlight: GMDSS expansion for Arctic Ocean Enhance delivery of forecast services Climate Service: To address Arctic impact of climate change Enhanced ice products in new Arctic Metarea services –Challenges Specifics of GFCS relevant to JCOMM Services unclear Core service mandates (e.g., Maritime Wx safety) vs. new activities Resource implications

21 Services and Forecast Systems Operational Ocean Forecasting –Highlight: Mercator-Ocean, Bluelink Science/technology for new operational capabilityoperational capability Research-operations partnerships for new service delivery –Challenges New partnerships/capabilities (physical, biological, ecological) to respond for oil spill, radiological discharge Ocean climate contributions to GFCS Fully coupled ocean/atmosphere forecast systems Web-based products and services, to support developing countries, including basic ocean forecast service, and use of model output for consensus forecasting

22 Services and Forecast Systems Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) –Highlight: Scientific & Technical support for national/regional improvement of Coastal Inundation Forecasting (storm surges and associated flooding) Capacity building demonstrating storm surge prediction –Challenge: Achieving societal outcomes will require more than National Service capacity, e.g., Building "storm ready coastal communities", Address infrastructure needs to deliver forecast to mariners/boats

23 Services and Forecast Systems Quality Management System Framework –Highlight: ISO9001 certified services E.g., UK, Canada, Australia, France – Challenge: Cost for certification process Weak rigorous QMS certification requirements for marine service (as compared to aviation service ) Supporting IMO/IHO E-Navigation Initiative Highlight: Maritime safety information for e-Navigation ECDIS display for Sea Ice objects moving toward application Met-Ocean object catalogue under development, to demonstrate at JCOMM 4 Challenge: Technological/cost challenges on dissemination of MSI to mariners Engage IMO on vision and directions for e-Navigation and future GMDSS

24 Cross Cutting Capacity Development –CD activity leader on MAN –JCOMM CD principles adopted by JCOMM 3 –Coordination with WMO and IOC CD programmes –Training workshops and courses within each PA –Technical publications, manuals and guides –Major scientific symposia and conferences –Future focus on competencies in marine meteorology and oceanography, related to QMS

25 Ocean remote sensing: priorities Maintaining an updated set of requirements for ocean satellite data, especially non-climate requirements Support for the key ocean satellite missions Working with the Expert Team on Satellite Utilization and Products of the WMO CBS on the utilization of satellite data and products Facilitating the availability of ocean satellite data and products for developing countries Developing a pilot project on surface vector winds, cf GHRSST

26 External Interactions Within WMO and IOC –With WMO Technical Commissions, esp. CBS, CCl, CHy, CAS, CAgM –With IOC major subsidiary bodies, esp. IODE –With GOOS, cross representation, iGSC and JCOMM MAN –With regional bodies: RAs, Sub-Commissions, GRAs –With major programmes: GOOS, GCOS, WCRP, Tsunamis, ICAM, DRR, Satellite, WIGOS/WIS UN System, NGOs, Private Sector –IMO, UNEP –IHO, GEO/GEOSS –ICS, OGP, Ship Classification Societies

27 JCOMM Web Site

28 Some Lessons Learned Pursue modest, achievable goals Exploit existing resources Build upon enthusiastic capabilities and expertise Ensure alignment between individual voluntary experts day job and function Devote efforts to developing appropriate information tools and vectors Do more with less (money, human resources)

29 Some Lessons Learned (2) Recognize that we are an integral part of our parent Organizations, and as such must respond to their objectives and expected outcomes, as decided by the Members/Member States Focus our work on the priorities of our parents At the same time, understand the needs and priorities of our direct user communities, and transmit these to the planning processes of our parents Actively seek out and respond to the needs of developing maritime countries, to improve services to their user communities

30 Some Final Remarks The session, achievements and prospects Wide participation in JCOMM work essential to ensure the program addresses all national interests and concerns, covering both meteorological and oceanographic communities Exciting and challenging times for marine meteorology and oceanography Operational oceanography has much to offer in societal benefits, but need work to ensure that this becomes a reality NMHS have an increasing and potentially significant role to play, along with national ocean institutes, in realizing these benefits In all of this, the cooperation between the meteorological and oceanographic communities is essential, and JCOMM is the recognized mechanism to make this happen Thanks for great support to: –SG/WMO, ES/IOC and Secretariats –PA coordinators –Chairs and members of ETs –Members/Member States for implementation –Republic of Korea for hosting the session

31 Thank you for your attention!


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