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EuropeanCommission Carbon, Food Security and Sustainable Development Carbon, Food Security and Sustainable Development MRV systems for carbon in soils.

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Presentation on theme: "EuropeanCommission Carbon, Food Security and Sustainable Development Carbon, Food Security and Sustainable Development MRV systems for carbon in soils."— Presentation transcript:

1 EuropeanCommission Carbon, Food Security and Sustainable Development Carbon, Food Security and Sustainable Development MRV systems for carbon in soils and vegetation: a development perspective Philip Mikos, Head of Unit Sustainable Management of Natural Resources DG EuropeAid Development and Co-operation 26th January 2011

2 EuropeanCommission Development framework EU food security policy Role of smallholders Key issues for agriculture: Sustainable development and agriculture Agriculture and carbon Agriculture and mitigation Maximising development outcome

3 EuropeanCommission EU Policy Objectives Framework of the MDGs Inclusive Growth, leading to poverty reduction Food Security Sustainable Development Human Development COM (2010) 629. EU development policy in support of inclusive growth and sustainable development (green paper) COM (2010) 127. An EU policy framework to assist developing countries in addressing food security challenges.

4 EuropeanCommission Food Security Policy: 2010 Communication Ensuring a more comprehensive approach to address food security challenges in developing countries In rural and urban areas Across all 4 pillars: 1) Increasing availability of food 2) Improving access to food 3) Improving nutritional adequacy of food intake 4) Enhancing crisis prevention and management Recognising that strategies need to be country-owned and country-specific

5 EuropeanCommission Smallholders are central to the Food Security Policy Sustainable small-scale food production as a main focal area of EU assistance: Ecologically efficient intensification Value chain approach (with due attention to financing, processing and markets) Governance is key - particularly around land Demand-driven research and innovation (incl. CC adaptation) Reducing post-harvest losses Regional integration

6 EuropeanCommission Key issues in Sustainable Development Climate change: combining mitigation requirements with adaptation needs Biodiversity: reducing losses Access to energy Managing forests and wetlands Ecosystem services Conserving and efficiently managing land and water resources Limiting environmental pollution

7 EuropeanCommission Rising cost of climatic instability to be urgently addressed Ethiopia ZWE Rainfall & GDP growth Source World Bank, WDR 2008

8 EuropeanCommission Carbon and sustainable development Natural synergy between mitigation and development: Carbon held in soils and vegetation limits CO 2 emissions Richer forests provide more resources for sustainable management and multiple use Carbon in soils increases water and nutrient holding capacity and resistance to erosion Richer soils and vegetation provide better ecosystem services (e.g. water supply from upland catchments) Developing countries have most potential for mitigation by agriculture, avoided deforestation or land use change Poor smallholder farmers, pastoralists and forest dwellers manage carbon sources and sinks

9 EuropeanCommission Agriculture significant emitter of GHGs C sequestration potential in soils Largest potential in developing countries The poor farmer has an extremely low carbon footprint Poorest as custodians of public goods – soils and forests Mitigation as a co-benefit of development (incentivise carbon friendly practices) Market-based incentives should be accessible to, and not disadvantage, smallholder farmers Synergies exist between mitigation, adaptation and development – but trade-offs may need to be made Mitigation must be development led

10 EuropeanCommission How to Maximise Development Outcomes A clear rationale Understanding of benefits. More C = more productive soils = improved food security (+ adaptive capacity) Net reduction of GHG emissions is a global public good A straightforward methodology for MRV Cost effective and easy to apply in developing countries Link to international standards Link to monitoring of development outcomes An equitable incentive mechanism Benefiting poor smallholders/ forest dwellers / pastoralists Safeguards to prevent elite capture Subsidy or market based?


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