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Office of Global Maritime Situational Awareness Office of Global Maritime Situational Awareness Lessons Learned Hurricane Katrina Aftermath.

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Presentation on theme: "Office of Global Maritime Situational Awareness Office of Global Maritime Situational Awareness Lessons Learned Hurricane Katrina Aftermath."— Presentation transcript:

1 Office of Global Maritime Situational Awareness Office of Global Maritime Situational Awareness Lessons Learned Hurricane Katrina Aftermath

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3 Overview August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the Gulf Coast of the United States. Hurricane Katrina and Rita, which hit a month later, were two of the most intense hurricanes ever recorded in the nations history. The Storm affected 90,000 square miles of land, an area the size of Great Britain. Over 80 percent of the city of New Orleans flooded. More than 1.5 million people were affected and more than 800,000 citizens were forced to live outside of their homes – the largest displacement of people since the great Dust Bowl migrations of the 1930s.

4 Economic Effects Flooded I-10 / I-610 West End Blvd interchange and the surrounding area of northwest New Orleans and Metairie, Louisiana. $105 billion for repairs & reconstruction 30 oil platforms destroyed = 9 refineries closed $150 billion economic impact in the areas of LA & MS

5 Coast Guard Rescues The response of Katrina remains the largest SAR operation in US history. The Coast Guard deployed hundreds of air and boat crew to rescue more than 33,735 people.

6 This Government will learn the lessons of Hurricane Katrina. We are going to review every action and make necessary changes so that we are better prepared for any challenge of nature, or act evil men, that could threaten our people. -President George W. Bush, September 15, Lessons Learned

7 National Preparedness Integrated Use of Military Capabilities Communications Logistics & Evacuation Search & Rescue Public Communications Critical Infrastructure Public Safety & Security Human Services Mass Care & Housing Environmental Hazards & Debris Foreign Assistance Non-Governmental Aid Training Exercises and Lessons Learned Citizen & Community Preparedness Homeland Security Professional Development & education Hurricane Katrina Critical Challenges

8 Better Preparation for Future Storms There are 125 specific recommendations for improving the federal governments capability to respond to future disasters. The Federal Response to Hurricane Katrina: Lessons Learned released February 23, In 2006 DHS lead a series of hurricane exercises to increase senior official skills and awareness. DHS conducted a stakeholders conference to review remedial actions and explore opportunities for improvement with Federal, State, Local and Private organizations. Since the release of the report there has been weekly meetings with departments and agencies to review Katrina actions and remediation.

9 The Federal Government improves after a crisis based on lessons learned. National Preparedness involves a continuous cycle of activities to develop the elements (e.g., plans, procedures, policies, training and equipment) necessary to maximize the capability to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from domestic incident especially major events that require coordination among an appropriate combination of Federal, State, local, tribal, private sector, and non- governmental entities, in order to minimize the impact on lives, property and the economy. Benefits of a Data Sharing Partnership

10 Lessons Learned DHS with the support from the Office of Science and Technology Policy, should develop a National Emergency Communications Strategy that supports comms operability and interoperability. DHS in coordination with State and local governments and the private sector, should develop a modern, flexible and transparent logistics systems. This plan should be able to if necessary to replace State and local logistical systems by leveraging resources within both public and private sector. DOT in coordination with other departments of the Executive Branch, must also be prepared to conduct mass evacuation operations when disasters overwhelm or incapacitate State and local government. DHS should lead an interagency review of current policies and procedures to ensure effective integration of all federal search and rescue assets during disaster response.

11 Lessons Learned The Storm demonstrated the need for greater integration and synchronization of preparedness efforts, not only throughout the Federal government, but with State and local government as well as the private and non-profit sectors.

12 Contact Information Lieutenant Kat Pabon, USCG Office of Global Maritime Situational Awareness (202) (202)


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