Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Higher Education to 2030 What futures for quality access in the era of globalisation? How might new technologies and pedagogies contribute to quality access.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Higher Education to 2030 What futures for quality access in the era of globalisation? How might new technologies and pedagogies contribute to quality access."— Presentation transcript:

1 Higher Education to 2030 What futures for quality access in the era of globalisation? How might new technologies and pedagogies contribute to quality access in the future? ICT for lifelong leaning Maruja Gutiérrez Díaz Head of Unit Creativity and Innovation DG Education and Culture

2 Three starting premises LLL is an accepted paradigm but not yet a key objective for HE the all-encompassing learning environment requested by the knowledge society cannot become true without HE the all-encompassing learning environment requested by the knowledge society cannot become true without ICT

3 HE & ICT: Three core action areas The future of HE: steering change HE for life: Continuing professional development Exploiting the learning potential of ICT: Innovative learning tools and methods What HE delivers in all three areas will not only significantly improve HE, but it will also in time overspill in the general learning infrastructure

4 The future of HE: which scenario? Open Networking? Flexibility and autonomy, for students and for institutions New approaches to teaching, more individualised Strengthened international cooperation, Availability of free and open knowledge Still a strong hierarchy among HE institutions, ICT networking allows institutions not focused on research to benefit from advances in knowledge …only with ICT

5 A lifelong learning scenario Open Networking is not just an HE scenario A consistent lifelong learning approach can be developed along the same principles: –new approaches to teaching, increased flexibility –user-centred, more autonomy for students –support and exploitation of new technologies, –increased networking of institutions and of public- private partnerships between education stakeholders –improved access opportunities allow those with fewer resources to benefit from advances in knowledge

6 Continuing professional development Possibly the most important part of LLL, it should be associated to initial qualification Some countries/professions already request periodical formal proof of updated competences Professional publishing and internet use point to a strong and growing demand for CPD support Academy has always made a virtue of continuing learning, yet it does not apply the same criteria to its clients CPD could be a substantial new business for HE ICT are particularly suited for CPD learning demand

7 Innovative learning tools and resources Understanding learning and learners: focused learning, personalised learning, contextual learning Understanding and exploiting what is already available: efficient & imaginative use of existing tools Appropriation and use of advanced learning tools: simulation, virtual reality, visualisation, games… Research on new learning tools: brain research, multilingual and multicultural issues, learning design, user involvement

8 Addressing new learning needs In new knowledge domains –Edge disciplines are increasingly important in HE –It is important to attract young people to them For new ways of using knowledge –Pluri-disciplinar approaches –Team-based work, multicultural-multilingual contexts Serving new users needs –New Millennium learners –Experienced learners, lifelong learners –Mobile learners (geographical, cultural, professional)

9 Some difficult challenges A quality learning infrastructure, user-oriented and widely accessible can be built with ICT but it requires New business models, public and private, for profit or not-for-profit, addressing IPR New access and delivery models New teaching and learning services models Social acceptance of radical changes – in particular of sensitive linguistic interplays Pedagogical and technological research

10 A particular education problem Failing to capitalize on the application of ICT Productivity growth has in recent years been driven mainly by the ICT-using services sector and it is precisely here that the difference is most obvious - productivity growth in the EU is relatively stable across time in contrast to a very large acceleration in the USA as it successfully applies ICT. Creating an innovative Europe – Aho Report, 2006

11 Three striking findings the impact of ICT on education and training has not yet been as great as had been expected. In particular, the transformation of business and public services through ICT has not yet reached education systems; embedding ICT in education and training systems at all levels requires further technological, organisational, and pedagogical changes at classrooms, workplaces, and informal learning settings; although ICT has the potential to develop a learning continuum that would support lifelong learning and embrace formal, informal and workplace learning, this has not yet happened The use of ICT to support innovation and lifelong learning for all SEC(2008)2629

12 Capitalizing ICT: a challenge for HE? ICT equipment and infrastructures are becoming mature, accessible and affordable User-centred /user-owned/ user-created learning and online services are reaching a critical mass An intelligent use of ICT for learning and teaching can greatly enhance the new skills required for new jobs In particular, ICT have proven useful for supporting and developing creative and entrepreneurial attitudes, which are at the base of a capacity for innovation

13 Our future depends on innovation In a remarkably short period of time, economic globalisation has changed the world economic order, bringing new opportunities and new challenges. In this new economic order, Europe cannot compete unless it becomes more inventive, reacts better to consumer needs and preferences and innovates more. A broad-based innovation strategy for the European Union COM(2006)502

14 It all hinges on human capital… Everywhere in the world, intangible capital is the most precious resource for advanced economies. Without it, traditional and financial resources, as well as fixed capital, will become decreasing resources. No nation can believe it has achieved a high quality of development if its human capital remains hidden or is under-used European Commission, 2007

15 …this is, on education Without education as a core policy, innovation will remain unsupported. It must promote talent and creativity from an early stage. Innovation is the missing element in the scenario HE has a crucial role for innovation, in all areas of knowledge, from humanities to advanced science, and in all sectors of society, public and private. Innovation is based on the transfer of knowledge and ICT provides unprecedented opportunities for it. A broad-based innovation strategy for the European Union COM(2006)502

16 The role of the European Union EU countries are immersed in a dynamic process of change and modernisation of HE Some interesting changes are happening at the European level: Bologna, EQF, multilingualism There is a strong political support in Europe for developing innovative HE and LLL strategies The EU can well be a futures lab for HE in the knowledge society… …but the transformation of HE is a global trend and a global vision needs to be developed

17 Thank you for your attention!


Download ppt "Higher Education to 2030 What futures for quality access in the era of globalisation? How might new technologies and pedagogies contribute to quality access."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google