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Fred Rojek Booz Allen Hamilton

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Presentation on theme: "Fred Rojek Booz Allen Hamilton"— Presentation transcript:

1 Fred Rojek Booz Allen Hamilton
Application of a Model Based Systems Engineering Method to Manage Project Risk Fred Rojek Booz Allen Hamilton Advanced Risk Management Seminar Applications to Systems Engineering November 8–9

2 Thesis Application of a Model Based Systems Engineering method can contribute to the implementation of an effective risk management program because…

3 Agenda Systems Engineering Objective Systems Engineering Challenge
Essential Elements of a Model Based Systems Engineering Method MBSE Application Example Conclusion

4 Systems Engineering’s Objective
Translate user operational needs into an efficient and cost-effective system solution Capture the solution in a complete and coherent* system documentation** needed to design, integrate, test, operate and logistically support a system that fully meets user operational needs Specification Design Test Operation Support Other Supporting Work Products: Trade Studies, Analyses, Technical Reports, Meeting Minutes… * Coherent: Composed of mutually dependent parts; making a logical whole; consistent; as a coherent plan, argument, or discourse. Webster Dictionary ** Also known as work products

5 Systems Engineering’s Challenge
Capture the solution in a complete and coherent system documentation needed to design, integrate, test, operate and logistically support a system… Systems Engineering Processes

6 Systems Engineering’s Challenge
System requirements, design data, and information relevant to a wide variety of engineering, technical and domain disciplines Totality of requirements in the thousands (possibly tens of thousands); Often changing, sometimes well into design Dozens (possibly hundreds) of scientists, specialists, engineers, designers, testers, manufacturers…, from multiple & diverse technical disciplines Customers, operators, maintainers, suppliers… with great domain expertise, little engineering expertise (and vice versa) Should tie together into a unified whole Should always be traceable to User Operational Needs Hundreds to thousands of components employing a wide variety of technologies manufactured throughout the country, possibly the world (ex. International Space Station) Never ending issues and risks associated at varying development levels that span a wide range of technical and domain expertise

7 Application of a MBSE Method to Partially Address the Challenge
Systems Engineering Processes supports Model Based Systems Engineering Method

8 Essential Elements of a MBSE Method
Use of models as the central and unifying element to the development of a system* Application across SE processes Application down and up development levels Application throughout system lifecycle Use of computerized SE tools to support the method * “…model-based [systems] engineering is about elevating models in the engineering process to a central and governing role in the specification, design, integration, validation, and operation of a system.” Estefan, J.A., Survey of Model Based Systems Engineering Methodologies, INCOSE MBSE Focus Group (http://syseng.omg.org/MBSE_Methodology_Survey_RevA.pdf)

9 1. Models as Central and Unifying Element
Well defined, unambiguous language/notation, understood by all stakeholders, to describe and analyze the system Multiple system views to fully communicate system requirements and design Requirements, Behavioral, Structure, Performance, Data, Managerial… Integrated/Traceable; Complimentary; Consistent…non contradictory Underlying structure (or schema) to define model elements, attributes and relationships – Information Model Executability Models are the primary means of communication with clients, builders, and users; models are the language of the architect. The Art of Systems Architecting, Maier, M., Rechtin, E., CRC Press, 2002

10 Multiple System Views to Communicate Requirements & Design*
Requirements Hierarchy (System Traceability) Operations & Logical/Functional (System Behavior) Physical Hierarchy (System Structure) Verification Requirements Physical Block Diagram (System Interconnection) *Views produced by CORE

11 functional I/O implemented by
Integrated! trace to allocated to verified by functional I/O implemented by Additional Views used as required to communicate other relevant system characteristics

12 Information Model Example*
Requirement refined by Function decomposed by basis of performed by Component built from joined to Interface results in results in causes verified by causes causes causes Verification Requirement Risk causes fulfilled by documented by assigned to resolved by Document Verification Event Organization Program Activity * Partial View of CORE Schema

13 Information Model Example*
Requirement refined by Function decomposed by basis of performed by Component built from joined to Interface results in results in generates verified by generates generates generates Verification Requirement Issue generates fulfilled by documented by assigned to resolved by Document Verification Event Organization Program Activity * Partial View of CORE Schema

14 2. Application Across SE Processes
Systems Engineering Process Model Requirements Analysis Requirements Models Functional Analysis Behavioral Models To Next Development Level Design/Synthesis Physical Models Safety Analysis Human Factors RAM Analysis Logistic Analysis EMI Analysis Assessment MBSE WORKS WELL IN THE VERY ITERATIVE SOMETIME CHAOTIC NATURE OF COMPLEX SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT. Integration of Data and Decisions Generated by Supporting Project Processes and Specialty Engineering Studies Assessment Results . System Analysis & Control* * Trade-off Studies, Risk Management, Interface Management, Configuration Management…

15 3. Application Down & Up Development Phases
Operational Test Concept Validation Requirements Validation Results Verification Requirements System Design System Integration & Verification Verification Results Product Design Product Integration & Verification Verification Requirements Verification Results Verification Requirements Subsystem Design Subsystem Integration & Verification Verification Results Verification Requirements Component Design Component Integration & Verification Verification Results Integration & Verification Decomposition & Design HW Fab & Assembly; SW Code Part & CSU Verification

16 4. Application Throughout Acquisition Lifecycle
Concept Refinement Advanced Development Engineering Design Integration & Evaluation Production Operation & Support SyS Prod 3 Prod 2 Prod 1 Sys Prod 3 Prod 2 Prod 1 Subsys 3.1 Subsys 1.2 Subsys 1.1 Subsys 3.2 Sys Prod 3 Prod 2 Prod 1 Subsys 3.1 Subsys 1.2 Subsys 1.1 Subsys 3.2 Comp 3.1.1 Comp 1.1.2 Comp 1.1.1 Comp 3.1.2 Sys Prod 3 Prod 2 Prod 1 Subsys 3.1 Subsys 1.2 Subsys 3.2 Comp 3.1.1 Comp 1.1.2 Comp a Comp 3.1.3 Subsys 1.1 Comp 1.1.1 Increasing Model Complexity

17 System Development History Maintained
Concept Refinement Advanced Development Engineering Design Integration & Evaluation Production Operation & Support Sys Prod 3 Prod 2 Prod 1 Subsys 3.1 Subsys 1.2 Subsys 3.2 Comp 3.1.1 Comp 1.1.2 Comp a Comp 3.1.3 Subsys 1.1 Comp 1.1.1 Accumulated System Data & Information (History)

18 5. Use of Computerized SE Tools to Support the MBSE Method
Modeling Support the modeling language and schema; produce the needed system views Maintain horizontal and vertical traceability Data Management Single, central repository to manage all related system data and information Document Generation Automated generation of formal documentation & work products (drawn from central model repository) System/Segment Specification (SSS); Interface Requirements Specification (IRS); Test & Evaluation Plan (TEP); Software Requirements Specification (SRS)... Integral to the SE Environment to support the MBSE method See Survey of Model Based Systems Engineering Methodologies (http://syseng.omg.org/MBSE_Methodology_Survey_RevA.pdf) for a discussion of commercial tools available that could be used to support MBSE method application

19 MBSE Application Example

20 Waste Management System (WMS)
System Mission* - Accept, transport, & dispose of hazardous material in a manner that protects health, safety and the environment; and merits public confidence System Concept WMS Transportation System Waste Acceptance System Disposal System Transport hazardous material from Waste Generation Sites to Disposal System Interface between Waste Production Sites & Disposal System Receive and dispose of hazardous material *Documented in WMS Requirements Document

21 WMS Concept of Operations
Maintenance Facility Unloaded waste containers Unloaded waste containers* Operations Center Disposal System Waste Generation Site Loaded waste containers *Transportation modes include rail, truck, barge; possibly a combination of all three depending upon OS location Equipment flow Information flow

22 Transportation System Concept Model
Maintenance Facility Waste Generation Site xports unloaded containers to maintains Waste Container Rail or Truck Equipment Transport Equip carries generates Disposal Facility xports loaded containers to coordinates/ controls stores Operations Center utilizes Existing Infrastructure contains coordinates/ controls Waste Transportation System Components Waste Generation Site Ops Disposal Facility Ops

23 WMS Transportation System Development Phase

24 * All views produced by the CORE SE Tool
System Model Views * All views produced by the CORE SE Tool

25 System Requirements (sample)
The system shall be capable of: Accepting and receiving 400 tons of waste in 1st year of operations Accepting and receiving 3800 tons in 2nd year of operations Shall be capable of accommodating a range of waste storage and transportation technologies Shall comply with the applicable provisions of: Legislation Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) EPA Standards DoT Regulations Association of American Railroads (AAR) Regs

26 Requirements Model Development
“The WMS shall comply with the waste material transportation practices documented in the …” “The WMS shall be capable of receiving waste, mostly by rail, at the system operating conditions and receipt rates specified in…” The Transportation System shall be capable of voice communications with rail consists at all times throughout shipment operations. The Transportation System shall have the capability to store (TBD)% of the waste container inventory. The Transportation System shall have the capability to store (TBD)% of the rolling stock inventory.

27 System Behavior Model Development
Transportation System Functional Context Diagram System Behavior Model Development

28 System Behavior Model Development – Decomposition
Transportation System Functional Context Diagram System Behavior Model Development – Decomposition Perform Transportation System Operations Operate & Maintain Transportation System

29 System Behavior Model Development – Functional I/O
Functional I/O Includes Data, Information, Material External Interface Development

30 Physical Model Development
Transportation System Physical Context Diagram

31 Physical Model Development
Transportation System Physical Hierarchy

32 Functional Allocation
Subsystem Functions from Behavior Model Allocated to the Operations Center Subsystem

33 Requirements Traceability
Subsystem Requirements from Requirements Model Trace to Operations Center Functions

34 Structural Model Development – Interconnection Diagram
Operations Center Functional I/O Items from Behavior Model Transferred by Interface Links

35 Transportation System
System Specification SYSTEM SPECIFICATION FOR THE Transportation System Prepared For: Prepared By: System Performance Specification Documents Requirements* *Document generated by Computerized SE tool (CORE), drawing data from Central Repository

36 Conclusion Application of a Model Based Systems Engineering methodology can contribute to the implementation of an effective Risk Management program because: Models can effectively communicate system requirements and design detail to all disciplines, at all system levels; Simultaneously accessible to all team members (IPTs, special study groups, analysis teams, etc.) (identification) Executable models allow analysis of system behavior (assessment and analysis) Risk documentation products - identified risks, assessment results, mitigation plans etc. – can become an integral part of the system models, maintained in central repository (management) Risk documentation products can be automatically generated from tools supporting SE environment drawing model data from central repository (management) MBSE methodology allows Risk Management to become an integral part of the overall system development effort, throughout all development phases/levels, throughout the system lifecycle (management)

37 Questions

38 Backup

39 Other Model Based Initiatives (you may have heard of)
Model Driven Engineering (MDE) Model Driven Architecture (MDA)1,2 Model Driven Development (MDD)1,2 Model Based Application Development1 Model Based Programming1 Object Oriented Systems Engineering Method (OOSEM) using SySML1 Rational Unified Process for Systems Engineering (RUP SE)3 How do these differ from MBSE? or MBE or MDSD 1. Object Management Group (OMG) trademarks (http://www.omg.org/legal/tm_list.htm) 2. MDA & MDD are actually implementations of MDE 3. IBM Rational trademark


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