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International Council On Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Presentation: Customer Needs and Objectives: Lessons Learned from Homeland Security Rob Simons Operations.

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Presentation on theme: "International Council On Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Presentation: Customer Needs and Objectives: Lessons Learned from Homeland Security Rob Simons Operations."— Presentation transcript:

1 International Council On Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Presentation: Customer Needs and Objectives: Lessons Learned from Homeland Security Rob Simons Operations Analysis – Systems and Flight Engineering The Boeing Company

2 Operations Analysis View Operations Analysis is the analytical arm of the Systems Engineering discipline – we provide the foundation for: Identifying customer needs analytically and collaboratively Define and translate operational requirements into system requirements; and decompose systems requirements into task and functional requirements Assessing engineering concept designs in Network Centric and System-of- System environments Performing Variable Analysis (Effectiveness, Trade Studies, etc.) and support Architecture Design Analyzing/evaluating concepts, systems, cost, and functionality, and aiding Roadmap Development Providing independent honest broker decision support and value FYI: The Federal FY2006 budget request for state and local homeland security programs was $3.36B. The worldwide Homeland Security market is estimated at $1.015 Trillion over the next ten years 1 1 Homeland Security Research Corp

3 Homeland Security & Homeland Defense Definition Homeland Security Federal, State, and Local efforts to prevent and combat terrorism within the continental United States (CONUS). Central authority resides in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) – a civil agency – with the Department of Defense (DoD) as a supporting agency. There are 56 State and Territory Homeland Security representatives. Homeland Security Federal, State, and Local efforts to prevent and combat terrorism within the continental United States (CONUS). Central authority resides in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) – a civil agency – with the Department of Defense (DoD) as a supporting agency. There are 56 State and Territory Homeland Security representatives. Homeland Defense Efforts from the Department of Defense (DoD) to prevent and combat terrorism in CONUS (primarily) and OCONUS. Includes direct support to civil authorities, as well as protection of military facilities in CONUS. Actual military operations are executed globally. The primary DoD agency for CONUS is NORTHCOM*. Homeland Defense Efforts from the Department of Defense (DoD) to prevent and combat terrorism in CONUS (primarily) and OCONUS. Includes direct support to civil authorities, as well as protection of military facilities in CONUS. Actual military operations are executed globally. The primary DoD agency for CONUS is NORTHCOM*. * NORTHCOMs mission covers homeland defense AND civil support; Military Assistance to Civil Authorities (MACA) mission includes consequence management support operations to local/state agencies at the direction of POTUS and/or OSD DHS Birth Pangs Still a framework vs. a true department of 22 agencies, 180K+ people, etc. Brand new organization seen as encroaching on turf of existing agencies Pressure on DHS to do something; Public perception and expectation is that something is being done Much current criticism says nothing is being done DHS mandated to work closely with local/state/regional jurisdictions; not a lot of experience doing this… DHS Birth Pangs Still a framework vs. a true department of 22 agencies, 180K+ people, etc. Brand new organization seen as encroaching on turf of existing agencies Pressure on DHS to do something; Public perception and expectation is that something is being done Much current criticism says nothing is being done DHS mandated to work closely with local/state/regional jurisdictions; not a lot of experience doing this…

4 Department of Homeland Security Challenges DHS Strategic Objectives (4) Prevent terrorism in the United States –Intelligence and Warning –Border and Transportation Security –Domestic Counterterrorism Reduce vulnerability of the U.S. to terrorism –Protect critical infrastructure and key assets –Defend against catastrophic threats Minimize damage and assist in recovery from terrorist attacks that do occur in the U.S. –Emergency preparedness and response Carry out other Non-Homeland Security functions FYI: On December 17, 2003, President Bush signed Homeland Security Presidential Directive–8: National Preparedness (HSPD-8). HSPD-8 establishes policies to strengthen the preparedness of the United States to address all- hazards threats… HSPD-8 outlines Federal assistance to State and Local governments and is the foundation for two important offices: SLGCP (State and Local Government Coordination and Preparedness) ODP (Office of Domestic Preparedness)

5 Scope of the Problem National Homeland Security Challenges: Land Borders: Nearly 7,500 miles of land border with Mexico and Canada; 500 million people, 130 million motor vehicles and 2.5 million rail cars cross each year Littoral: ~ 95,000 miles of shoreline and navigable waters, 361 ports; thousands of foreign flag vessels, 9 million containers of cargo, and nearly 200 million cruise and ferry passengers every year Airports: Approximately 422 primary airports with 124 commercial airports that handle ~30,000 flights and 1.8 million passengers every day Transportation: Approximately 110,000 miles of major highways and 220,000 miles of rail track; ~600,000 bridges; 95% of U.S. oversea trade moves by ship; $11T US GDP Physical Infrastructure: 85% of U.S. Critical Infrastructure is owned by the Private Sector State Critical Infrastructure Risks Citizenry Nuclear Power Plants Government Facilities Religious & Symbolic: Cathedrals, St. Louis Arch, the Hill, etc. Hospitals, Academic Institutions, Sports Complexes Gathering Places (seasonal threats) Transportation Systems: Riverine traffic, Interstate Freeways, Rail Transfer Facilities, Airports Gas Pipelines & Refineries Farming/Food products (corn, soybean, distribution centers, etc.) Water Supply System / Electrical Grid Federal Reserve Banks (8th in St. Louis; 10th in Kansas City) Boeing IDS St. Louis Site (only F-15 and F/A-18 production lines) Military Bases (Scott AFB, Whiteman AFB, Ft. Leonard Wood, etc.) FYI: National Incident Management System (NIMS) - Provides a framework for standardization and interoperability for homeland security organizations and responders at the federal, state, and local level

6 HLS Means A Non-Traditional Customer Community with Non-Traditional Issues Very different environment, threat, and user community with various jurisdictions, interests, and objectives –Federal level Homeland Security includes DHS, ODP, DoJ, and others –Local/State government (ex., St. Louis County has 91 separate jurisdictions) –Law Enforcement Example – Various local PDs, County Sheriffs, Highway Patrol, State Police, interagency task forces Most local agencies do not have consistent interaction at the Federal level –Many have difficulty describing their roles in larger contexts and surprisingly little is actually documented; far more tribal knowledge FYI: Most local and State assistance programs are administered by SLGCP/ODP State Homeland Security Grant Program (SHSGP) Targeted Infrastructure Protection Program (TIPP) Firefighter Assistance Program (FIRE) Emergency Management Performance Grants (EMPF) Citizens Corps Programs (CCP) Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) 1 1 For FY2006, approximately $1.02B has been requested for UASI areas for homeland security equipment, training, exercises, and planning

7 Mistaken Assumptions The application of our common processes is generally intuitive and effective within any organization Non-traditional organizations dont see things as we do and are unfamiliar with our processes and strategies –We do better with traditional organizations because our experience is primarily with organizations at the Federal level (e.g., DoD); Why? Because we tend to come from those environments ourselves and were generally working with peers –Our traditional partner organizations tend to have robust technical staff, resources, and activities that lend themselves to SE processes; these organizations share a language and experience-base with us that facilitates understanding capabilities, processes and technologies, etc. This is a common matrix of classifications; virtually the entire rank and file of homeland security organizations fall on the bottom two lines…

8 LE Discovery Efforts and Relationship Building Objective: Learn about law enforcement and crime analysis in a day-to-day operational environment Observations: –Significant training / expertise is needed to fully appreciate, understand, and execute daily tasks; they are substantially understaffed, but the folks they have are EFFECTIVE –Intel Unit performs LOTS of data entry and tracking functions –Little predictive analysis is performed here; this is due to manning constraints and mission demands (considerable adhoc support requests) and is not by design Ad-hoc requests from (primarily) local, county, and regional organizations Support to Task Forces such as HIDTA, Financial Crimes, Methamphetamine Interdiction efforts, Major Case Squad, Undercover Operations, and others is very important –Proactive policing does occur through COMPSTAT-like activities –Opportunity to see JRIES –Process improvements would substantially improve daily ops –A key personal attribute shared by all analysts is critical thinking, curiosity, and a willingness to see a task through to completion –A great appreciation for just how much is accomplished Note: Law enforcement seem focused on how they do things and not necessarily why do you do this or why not do something else… FYI: MO reported 2,788 unique meth-based incidents in 2004 (labs busted, etc.) There are over 2700 separate sources for MO drinking water MO has over 62,000 miles of Natural Gas pipelines

9 My View of Potential Local/Regional Threats and Key Weaknesses Threats Drug Production/Trafficking – Methamphetamine, drug transshipments, etc. All Hazard Response –LE / Medical / Fire –Catastrophic Events; e.g., New Madrid Fault Line Illegal Immigration Domestic Terrorism (extremists and subversive groups) Organized Crime Agroterrorism – Intentional contamination of food supply, etc. Weaknesses Resource constraints –$$, Staffing, technology gap, and expectations to meet expanding mandates with little likelihood of additional resources to meet the need Inability to share and collaborate as needed (and desired) Will have difficulty complying with National Preparedness Goal (HSPD-8) USA Today Report on Domestic Terrorism: New trouble at Home …not a lot of attention is being paid to this, because everybody is concerned about the guy in a turban. But there are still plenty of angry, Midwestern white guys out there…

10 Articulated Law Enforcement Desires 1) Improved processes of information and organizational access, joint collaboration, shared analysis, and timely dissemination 2) Simplified data creation that is easily consumed and captures/describes SALUTE-type data 3) Analysis-supported detection of thresholds of activity in specific geographic areas that support strategic planning to all units of the department 4) Employment of variable GIS solutions that describe hot spots by geographic boundaries and provide better situational awareness to optimize resources 5) While not always equal across the board, be interoperable across the board 6) Identify and help demonstrate the value of new features (they dont know what they dont know…and they need our help) FYI: The Homeland Security Operations Center (HSOC) is the DHS 24/7 operation incident management facility HSOC hosts ~35 distinct local through federal agencies divided between Intelligence; and Law Enforcement Even with the close proximity, each requires different levels of clearance to access information

11 A Simplified, Workable Homeland Security Discovery Process Lesson Learned: Not much joint confidence between customers and ourselves Lesson Learned: Not much joint confidence between customers and ourselves Lesson Learned: Near Term is Good; Far Term is Bad; Articulate the Roadmap Lesson Learned: Near Term is Good; Far Term is Bad; Articulate the Roadmap Initiate Operations Analysis Process; Link objectives, lessons learned and threats to ongoing law enforcement initiatives, embed homeland security efforts as appropriate, and prioritize against organizational needs Initiate Operations Analysis Process; Link objectives, lessons learned and threats to ongoing law enforcement initiatives, embed homeland security efforts as appropriate, and prioritize against organizational needs Lesson Learned: Common terminology and other dumb disconnects (ex., defining Intelligence) Lesson Learned: Common terminology and other dumb disconnects (ex., defining Intelligence) Lesson Learned: Were not a very Collaborative team (ex., locals waiting for reqmts) Lesson Learned: Were not a very Collaborative team (ex., locals waiting for reqmts) Generalized Law Enforcement Objectives Desired Outcome: A collaborative relationship that recognizes joint needs, establishes a joint strategy to meet the needs, and sets the stage for common understanding and expectations for the outcome Discovery Activities (Language, Operations, Rqmts, etc.) Discovery Activities (Language, Operations, Rqmts, etc.) Jointly define the How to Get There from Here Roadmap Jointly define the How to Get There from Here Roadmap Iterative Analysis and Customer Collaboration (Manage Expectations) Iterative Analysis and Customer Collaboration (Manage Expectations) Build A Relationship Of Joint Purpose And Understanding Build A Relationship Of Joint Purpose And Understanding

12 Summary: Lessons Learned The importance of relationship creation and trust is critical Discovery efforts build tremendous knowledge and understanding –Walk a Mile In Their Shoes… State and Local organizational constraints: policy, staffing, technology, and other issues; unfunded mandates and requirements flowed down from federal levels arent helping Non-traditional customers have non-traditional perspectives and views –Not used to working with local and state level agencies and organizations; ex., law enforcement Ex., Intelligence in the C4I sense and Intelligence in the LE sense are NOT the same Virtually none of these folks have security clearances; the few who do are no higher than SECRET Inability to collaborate among traditional and non-traditional organizations is largely policy-based and really not a technology issue Homeland security solutions MUST: -Be Collaborative; this creates strong partnerships and shared purpose across public and private domains, dissimilar and non- traditional organizations -Solve problems related to enduring needs; interoperability is key - Provide the right information to the right people at the right time to be really meaningful

13 Links of Interest Federal Level –Department of Homeland Security –Office of Domestic Preparedness State Level: Missouri –Office of Homeland Security –State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) State Level: Illinois –State Homeland Security –Illinois Emergency Management Agency (IEMA) Contact Info: Rob Simons Ops Analysis, Systems and Flight Engineering


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