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Safety and health at work is everyone’s concern. It’s good for you. It’s good for business. e-tools meeting Paris 20 October 2014.

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Presentation on theme: "Safety and health at work is everyone’s concern. It’s good for you. It’s good for business. e-tools meeting Paris 20 October 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 Safety and health at work is everyone’s concern. It’s good for you. It’s good for business. e-tools meeting Paris 20 October 2014

2 2 Welcome  Stéphane Pimbert – INRS – Replaced by Marie DE France Marie de France welcomed the participants and introduced the meeting on behalf of INRS. INRS chairs the PEROSH network (12 Members around Europe). PEROSH could be a good “tool” for dissemination and collaboration  Lorenzo Munar – EU-OSHA

3 3 Purpose of the meeting  Share & Discuss with you (EU-OSHA´s stakeholders) the “e- tools” activity/project in the process of being set up by EU-OSHA Inform about what the Agency is planning to do on this specific project Gather feedback / proposals to better define: − the project, and above all; − the role of “facilitator” to be played by the Agency  Assess the possibility of “working together” on the topic

4 4 Practical information about the meeting  Agenda - From 10:00 to 16:30  Practical information regarding the reimbursement Welcome10:00 – 10:05 Practical information related to the meeting10:05 – Tour de table10:15 – 10:30 Presentation about “e-tools” - Agency10:30 – 11:00 Discussion with the group11:00 – 13:00 Dinner Break13:00 – 14:00 Presentation e-tools project = network project/activity - Agency 14:00 – 14:30 Discussion with the group14:30 – 15:30 Summary / Conclusions15:30 – 16:00

5 5 Tour de table  EU-OSHA´s representatives  EU-OSHA´s Board members & Commission  EU-OSHA´s FoPs  HSA (representing the IRAT network)  Perosh Members

6 Safety and health at work is everyone’s concern. It’s good for you. It’s good for business. e-tools project Lorenzo Munar

7 7 E-tools: the context  Online interactive tools (“e-tools”) are the result of the evolution of computer technology and Web use practices  The OSH sector is no stranger to this trend/evolution  Many OSH actors have already developed such tools  EU Strategic Framework on OSH ( ) mentions IT based tools  E-tools’ main (but non only) target audience: micro and small companies to facilitate compliance with legislation to foster the development of a health and safety culture

8 8 What do we mean by e-tools  It is a piece of software that can run on the Internet, on a computer, or on a phone or other electronic device. It is denominated as "e" as ‘electronic’, to differentiate it from traditional paper based tools or publications.  It is ‘interactive’ because it requires some input of information from the user (whether in the form of knowledge input e.g. through completion of a checkbox or data field, or measurement of the environment e.g. smartphone measurement of noise or light levels) and based on this input it provides tailored information, such as guiding the user through a decision-making process. In this sense an ‘e-tool’ is different from a static or passive instrument: traditional factsheets, checklists, e-guide, etc.  It focuses on health and safety issues  It is free for the end users (“free” to be better defined)  Examples of Online OSH tools: OiRA, Besmart, …., Apps.  Non e-tools: traditional guides, checklists, factsheets,.. (available on paper or in electronic format). Very first attempt to define an e-tool (this definition needs to be improved, …)

9 9 What do we mean by e-tools – discussions 1 – “free”  The concept of “free” has to be considered – especially given the development costs of these kind of tools. But there is a very thin line and slippery slope. A lot may depend on the business model.  “Non-commercial” or “not for profit” may be a better terminology.  If a tool is free, then who is actually paying? The Government? The issue may be of direct or indirect payment (through taxation etc.)  Problem is that MSEs are not very keen to pay for such tools. Germany have had OSH model projects – and MSEs will not want to pay anything.  Another option could be free for small companies and not free for bigger ones. Tools having a free part for MSEs plus a commercial part that is for larger enterprises – more specialized assessments could be a kind of compromise. The “free”, “non-comercial”, “not for profit”, … issue will have to be consider/clarify when setting up the e-tools project.

10 10 What do we mean by e-tools – discussions 2 – “credibility – who is behind the tools”  MSEs want quality tools and want a reliable name behind the tool. Who is behind the tools is a very important issue – for credibility.  Small companies are developing innovative projects in OSH but lack credibility and resources – can big institutes develop synergy (back up these initiatives)? The credibility issue (who is the institution developing or supporting the e-tools) will also need to be considered at the moment of defining the e-tools project.

11 11 What do we mean by e-tools – discussions 3 – “quality issue”  The quality of e-tools was raised in the discussions having in mind at least two different aspects: The developer of the tool (already considered in the previous slide). We can asume that if a national OSH institute has developed an e- tool, the tool meets certain quality standards (experts have been involved, tools have been tested and validated before publishing them,..). The way the tools are used by the end-users. In this sense an e- tools is like a traditional tool (guide, checklists) you cannot control the way it is going to be used / filled in by an end-users. Having said that e-tools data entry could be tricky. In the e-tools policy to be set up a decision regarding this quality issue, (in its different dimensions) will need to be addressed.

12 12 What do we mean by e-tools – discussions 4 – (non-)experts tools  A discussion about the different kind of potential OSH e-tools took also place. See the graphic in the next slide showing the different kind of clusters of e-tools  At a certain level, most of these OSH tools could be grouped around two categories: expert tools and non expert tools Expert tools are intended to OSH experts and are - by definition - more accurate, professional, reliable, …. Only people with a special training or some competences are supposed to use them. Non expert tools are intended to employers/workers without a specific OSH background and of course tools are less accurate, reliable. The main purpose of these tools are to “increase awareness” on a certain risk/topic (for instance, app to measure noise) and it has not been developed to replace more “expert tools” but to provide an indication (with all its limits) to non experts at workplace level. Both kind of tools have their role to play and provided that they are presented, “marketed”, promoted in the correct way (not creating false expectations or misleading end users) they could fit into the e-tools project.

13 13 What do we mean by e-tools – First attempt to map the different “clusters of e-tools”

14 14 What do we mean by e-tools – discussions 5  E-tools can also be also defined by: the topic/sector/issue they are dealing with (main criteria followed in the graphic presented in the slide above) the software used (web application, …) the device / platform used : a computer, mobile phone, tablet

15 15 Perceptions about e-tools There is a common/shared perception that:  public institutions; trade unions; employers´ organisations, … have to be involved in the process of: developing and disseminating tools of good quality and putting them at the disposal of end users for free;  there is a need / room for: building on the experience of others; adopting / adapting existing tools (instead of developing them from scratch) or at least build new e-tools based on the experience of others; developing the tools in synergy/cooperation.

16 16 E-tools added value  Easy to use, interactive, easy to access, …  Associated to computers, tablets, smartphones, … innovation  Diffusion/dissemination is facilitated through internet / social media  Helping identify the hazards but above all providing “solutions” or at least associated to action (“tools for action”)  They have a didactic/methodological dimension  Offer the possibility of monitoring the use of such tools  An important/interesting “resource” (to inform, to raise awareness, …)  They can empower micro and small companies, so they can deal with / better addressed OSH management in house  They are good for involving / engaging with young people (workers, students, trainees) in OSH matters. IT Tools are attractive for younger workers, so they can be targeted.

17 17 E-tools added value  E-tools statistics can be used as an indicator (of a project).  E-tools can provide “big and important data”. The data also provides information about the e-tools´ effectiveness and navigability.  E-tools can be used in the context of a campaign. E-tools can be used as a means to mobilise partners e.g. social partners, labour inspectorates.  E-tools can be perceived / marketed as a medium to facilitate business (easy to use, interactive, easy to access, … )

18 18 (Potential) Shortcomings in the use of e-tools  Misuse of e-tools. For instance, “dirty and quick way” to do a risk assessments (with the interactive risk assessment tools)  Poor entry data – quality assurance issue  Need of a critical mass of users for use and feedback data.  Use of feedback data and statistics can be dangerous if information is not properly contextualised or the limits of the data is properly explained.

19 19 Some examples of e-tools with an EU dimension  OiRA  Stoffenmanager  Subsport  L´entreprise virtuelle/l´impresa virtuale

20 20 OiRA - An EU community sharing information, knowledge, photos, … (WORKING TOGETHER)  OiRA is based on the RI&E Dutch tool (same tool) EU-OSHA internationalised the RI&E tool (made it multilingual and develop some new features to meet the needs of EU Member States) Plone software – opensource philosophy  A common platform/software available in 18 languages  53 OiRA tools in 13 countries (and 30 under development)  There will be OiRA tools in 15 EU countries by end 2014  Numbers of OiRA users accounts created: (08/09/14):  Number of RA created: (08/09/14):

21 21 OiRA - An EU community sharing information, knowledge, photos, … (WORKING TOGETHER)  Challenges for the EU - OiRA shared platform Developing more tools and try to “cover” all the sectors Reach and make act micro and small companies Facilitate the sharing of information/tools

22 22 STOFFENMANAGER  Stoffenmanager is a tool which allows companies to safely work with hazardous substances and comply with regulations  The tool has been in place for more than ten years and exists in four different languages (Dutch, English, Finnish and German).  Managers of the tool has the aim “to establish Stoffenmanager as an internationally recognised, accepted and used tool” which they want to base on the following principles: Compliance Up to date with new scientific developments Consistency in all national versions Quality assurance A participatory approach  As part of their international strategy, Stoffenmanager makes use of an international group of so called ambassadors which provide feedback on usability and content  More information available at :

23 23 SUBSPORT  The goal of the SUBSPORT project is to develop an internet portal that constitutes a state-of-the-art resource on safer alternatives to the use of hazardous chemicals. It is not only a source of information on alternative substances and technologies, but also of tools and guidance for substance evaluation and substitution management.  The tool was publically funded and put in place by a consortium of European partners. SUBSPORT was a project funded under the LIFE- Programme, (ie not a development based on a contract). This involved four countries, plus training activities in additional countries and involving around 60 presentations both within and outside Europe.  More information available at :

24 24 L´entreprise virtuelle/l´impresa virtuale

25 25 L´entreprise virtuelle/l´impresa virtuale  Interactive tool featuring a virtual workplace and a variety of situations relevant to different types of workers, eg office workers, cleaning staff, those working on assembly lines, those delivering products, etc. The tool provides a variety of workplace settings and highlights the most important OSH issues in different situations (e.g. concerning handling chemicals, noise management, and stress).  Tool originally developed by the French Ministry of Work in cooperation with a range of organisations active in the field of OSH. More recently an Italian version of the tool was set up by INAIL (recently merged with ISPESL).  INAIL became aware of this tool ‘by accident’ through their internal press service which reported on this new tool. The organisation felt straight away that this was a well-designed and user-friendly tool which they wanted to make available for Italian users. INAIL therefore decided to purchase the right to make set up an Italian version of the tool, also because there has been no similar tool available for Italian companies.

26 26 L´entreprise virtuelle/l´impresa virtuale  The organisation paid EUR 20,000 directly to the French Ministry for the copyright and an additional EUR 9,120 was needed for setting the tool up in its Italian version. The latter amount was rather small as the organisation carried out all the translation needed internally. It was felt that this was a very cost-effective way of getting hold of such a well-designed online tool.  This is an interesting example of a tool developed in one Member State (France) which has subsequently been adopted by another (Italy). Therefore it illustrates both the process and costs linked to acquiring the copyright for an online OSH tool. It shows that this is a workable option for increasing access which can also be cost- effective.

27 Safety and health at work is everyone’s concern. It’s good for you. It’s good for business. Potential role to be played by EU-OSHA when it comes to the dissemination of these tools: “facilitator”

28 28 Potential role to be played by EU-OSHA when it comes to the dissemination of these tools: “facilitator” 1  Increasing awareness about these tools and their added-value (in general) (through EU-OSHA´s website (e-tools section, OSH wiki articles), networks, presentations in conferences, …) Example: OSH wiki article related to the topic: enterprises:_the_assets_of_digital_tools Organisation of an e-tools seminar in the framework of the conference USE2015 (in collaboration with INRS)

29 29 Potential role to be played by EU-OSHA when it comes to the dissemination of these tools: “facilitator” 2  Sharing knowledge about the development / dissemination of these tools (in general) (through EU-OSHA´s website (e-tools section, OSH wiki articles), networks, presentations in conferences, …) Example : IRAT network (sharing information about Online risk assessment tools). More information available Organisation of an e-tools seminar in the framework of the conference USE2015 (in collaboration with INRS)

30 30 Potential role to be played by EU-OSHA when it comes to the dissemination of these tools: “facilitator” 3  Contributing to the dissemination of the existing e-tools (specific tools) (through EU-OSHA´s website (e-tools section, OSH wiki articles), networks, presentations in conferences, …) Examples of Networks / meetings / conferences FoPs meetings Pre (EU-OSHA) Board seminars Meetings with OSH national bodies (worlwilde) European campaign events Conference on e-tools planned for 2015 Organisation of an e-tools seminar in the framework of the conference USE2015 (in collaboration with INRS)

31 31 Potential role to be played by EU-OSHA when it comes to the dissemination of these tools: “facilitator” 4  Encouraging the development of new e-tools or the adoption/adaptation of the existing ones by other institutions/MS by Contributing to disseminate specific tools at EU level (going beyond the national context in which were developed) Inviting institutions/MS to first check if there is already an e-tool (meeting their needs) already existing Facilitating the contact among Institutions/MS interested in specific tools −By putting people/institutions in contact −By organising a meeting gathering people/institutions interested

32 32 Potential role to be played by EU-OSHA when it comes to the dissemination of these tools: “facilitator” 5  Encouraging national institutions developing e- tools to consider (at a very early (design) stage): the multilingualism aspect the possibility to develop the tool in synergy – partnership with other MS the possibility of sharing the tools with other MS

33 33 Potential role to be played by EU-OSHA when it comes to the dissemination of these tools: “facilitator” 6  Identify potential sources of EU funding for developing / promoting e- tools Example: funding guide to be released before end of first semester 2015

34 Safety and health at work is everyone’s concern. It’s good for you. It’s good for business. Creating an e-tool developers’ community Tim Tregenza Network Manager

35 35 E-tools project = networking/community building project / activity  The benefits of building social capital  What would be the goals of the community?  How formal or structured would it be, and how would it work in practice?  What would be the costs and benefits of the community? For its members? For EU-OSHA?

36 36 Why develop a community?  Development of social capital  Four networking dimensions Support Advocacy and dissemination Content Collaboration

37 37 What are the goals? To achieve better prevention in workplaces by:  Better accessibility to available tools  Better quality tools (more quickly) To support tool developers:  By providing technical support between members  By sharing content information  By sharing dissemination strategies and other relevant information  By promotion of each others tools

38 38 What would be the structure?  Membership criteria: Are developing/have developed an OSH tool  No formal membership agreements (e.g. MoUs)  Personal contacts, not institutional  based  ?Annual meeting?

39 39 How would the community work?  Common list  Meetings coinciding with other planned events E.g. EU OSHA closing event Meetings of some network members (e.g. specific thematic meetings)  All responsible for own costs

40 40 Costs and benefits Benefits  You are not alone  Information resource (technical, content, activities)  Improved dissemination of tools  New developments Costs  You get out what you put in  Time to contribute  ?Travel costs?

41 41 What would be the EU OSHA role?  Stimulating political support for tools  A European perspective  A focal point for new tool developers Particularly beyond the EU  Platforms for promotion HWC Campaigns FOP and other networks

42 42 EU-OSHA´s network

43 43 Thank you

44 Safety and health at work is everyone’s concern. It’s good for you. It’s good for business. Next Steps

45 45 EU-OSHA activities for the next two years 2014  Start developing the “e-tools” section on EU-OSHA´s web site A web-based repository of information could be provided with relevant data about existing tools.  Start gathering OSH wiki articles: Describing specific e-tools Increasing awareness about the added value of these tools Sharing knowledge about how to develop/promote these tools  Paris 20 October e-tools meeting with EU-OSHA´s main stakeholders. Discuss about e-tools (definition, added-value, limits, ….) in general Discuss about the “facilitating role” to be played by the Agency. These discussions should help us to better define the project/EU-OSHA´s role

46 46 EU-OSHA activities for the next two years 2015  Continue developing the e-tools section  Organisation of an EU e-tools conference  Signposting potential sources of funding for the development/dissemination of e-tools (2 nd quarter 2015)  Organise an e-tools seminar in the framework of the conference USE2015  End 2015 and following the outcomes of the conference and the feedback received on the project by EU-OSHA stakeholders (Advisory groups, …) define EU-OSHA´s policy on e-tools for the following years.


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