Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

6-0 Multiple Cash Flows 6.1 – FV Example 1 You currently have $7,000 in a bank account earning 8% interest. You think you will be able to deposit an additional.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "6-0 Multiple Cash Flows 6.1 – FV Example 1 You currently have $7,000 in a bank account earning 8% interest. You think you will be able to deposit an additional."— Presentation transcript:

1 6-0 Multiple Cash Flows 6.1 – FV Example 1 You currently have $7,000 in a bank account earning 8% interest. You think you will be able to deposit an additional $4,000 at the end of each of the next three years. How much will you have in three years? LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

2 6-1 Multiple Cash Flows FV Example 1 continued Find the value at year 3 of each cash flow and add them together. Formula Approach Today (year 0): FV = 7000(1.08) 3 = 8,817.98 Year 1: FV = 4,000(1.08) 2 = 4,665.60 Year 2: FV = 4,000(1.08) = 4,320 Year 3: value = 4,000 Total value in 3 years = 8817.98 + 4665.60 + 4320 + 4000 = 21,803.58 LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

3 6-2 Multiple Cash Flows FV Example 1 continued Calculator Approach Today (year 0 CF): 3 N; 8 I/Y; -7000 PV; CPT FV = 8817.98 Year 1 CF: 2 N; 8 I/Y; -4000 PV; CPT FV = 4665.60 Year 2 CF: 1 N; 8 I/Y; -4000 PV; CPT FV = 4320 Year 3 CF: value = 4,000 Total value in 3 years = 8817.98 + 4665.60 + 4320 + 4000 = 21,803.58 LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

4 6-3 Multiple Cash Flows – FV Example 2 Suppose you invest $500 in a mutual fund today and $600 in one year. If the fund pays 9% annually, how much will you have in two years? Formula Approach FV = 500(1.09) 2 + 600(1.09) = 1248.05 Calculator Approach Year 0 CF: 2 N; -500 PV; 9 I/Y; CPT FV = 594.05 Year 1 CF: 1 N; -600 PV; 9 I/Y; CPT FV = 654.00 Total FV = 594.05 + 654.00 = 1248.05 LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

5 6-4 Multiple Cash Flows – FV Example 2 Continued How much will you have in 5 years if you make no further deposits? Formula Approach First way: FV = 500(1.09) 5 + 600(1.09) 4 = 1616.26 Second way – use value at year 2: FV = 1248.05(1.09) 3 = 1616.26 Calculator Approach First way: Year 0 CF: 5 N; -500 PV; 9 I/Y; CPT FV = 769.31 Year 1 CF: 4 N; -600 PV; 9 I/Y; CPT FV = 846.95 Total FV = 769.31 + 846.95 = 1616.26 Second way – use value at year 2: 3 N; -1248.05 PV; 9 I/Y; CPT FV = 1616.26 LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

6 6-5 Multiple Cash Flows – FV Example 3 Suppose you plan to deposit $100 into an account in one year and $300 into the account in three years. How much will be in the account in five years if the interest rate is 8%? Formula Approach FV = 100(1.08) 4 + 300(1.08) 2 = 136.05 + 349.92 = 485.97 Calculator Approach Year 1 CF: 4 N; -100 PV; 8 I/Y; CPT FV = 136.05 Year 3 CF: 2 N; -300 PV; 8 I/Y; CPT FV = 349.92 Total FV = 136.05 + 349.92 = 485.97 LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

7 6-6 Multiple Cash Flows – PV Example 1 You are offered an investment that will pay you $200 in one year, $400 the next year, $600 the year after, and $800 at the end of the following year. You can earn 12% on similar investments. How much is this investment worth today? LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

8 6-7 Multiple Cash Flows - PV Example 1 - Timeline 01234 200400600800 178.57 318.88 427.07 508.41 1432.93 LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

9 6-8 Multiple Cash Flows - PV Example 1 continued Find the PV of each cash flow and add them Formula Approach Year 1 CF: 200 / (1.12) 1 = 178.57 Year 2 CF: 400 / (1.12) 2 = 318.88 Year 3 CF: 600 / (1.12) 3 = 427.07 Year 4 CF: 800 / (1.12) 4 = 508.41 Total PV = 178.57 + 318.88 + 427.07 + 508.41 = 1432.93 LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

10 6-9 Multiple Cash Flows - PV Example 1 continued Calculator Approach Year 1 CF: N = 1; I/Y = 12; FV = 200; CPT PV = - 178.57 Year 2 CF: N = 2; I/Y = 12; FV = 400; CPT PV = - 318.88 Year 3 CF: N = 3; I/Y = 12; FV = 600; CPT PV = - 427.07 Year 4 CF: N = 4; I/Y = 12; FV = 800; CPT PV = - 508.41 Total PV = 178.57 + 318.88 + 427.07 + 508.41 = 1432.93 LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

11 6-10 Multiple Cash Flows Using a Spreadsheet You can use the PV or FV functions in Excel to find the present value or future value of a set of cash flows Setting the data up is half the battle – if it is set up properly, then you can just copy the formulas Click on the Excel icon for an example LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

12 6-11 Multiple Cash Flows – PV Example 2 You are considering an investment that will pay you $1000 in one year, $2000 in two years and $3000 in three years. If you want to earn 10% on your money, how much would you be willing to pay? LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

13 6-12 Multiple Cash Flows – PV Example 2 continued Formula Approach PV = 1000 / (1.1) 1 = 909.09 PV = 2000 / (1.1) 2 = 1652.89 PV = 3000 / (1.1) 3 = 2253.94 PV = 909.09 + 1652.89 + 2253.94 = 4815.93 Calculator Approach N = 1; I/Y = 10; FV = 1000; CPT PV = -909.09 N = 2; I/Y = 10; FV = 2000; CPT PV = -1652.89 N = 3; I/Y = 10; FV = 3000; CPT PV = -2253.94 PV = 909.09 + 1652.89 + 2253.94 = 4815.93 LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

14 6-13 Multiple Uneven Cash Flows – Using the Calculator Another way to use the financial calculator for uneven cash flows is to use the cash flow keys Texas Instruments BA-II Plus Press CF and enter the cash flows beginning with year 0 You have to press the “Enter” key for each cash flow Use the down arrow key to move to the next cash flow The “F” is the number of times a given cash flow occurs in consecutive years Use the NPV key to compute the present value by entering the interest rate for I, pressing the down arrow and then compute Clear the cash flow keys by pressing CF and then CLR Work LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

15 6-14 Decisions, Decisions Your broker calls you and tells you that he has this great investment opportunity. If you invest $100 today, you will receive $40 in one year and $75 in two years. If you require a 15% return on investments of this risk, should you take the investment? Use the CF keys to compute the value of the investment CF; CF 0 = 0; C01 = 40; F01 = 1; C02 = 75; F02 = 1 NPV; I = 15; CPT NPV = 91.49 No – the broker is charging more than you would be willing to pay. LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

16 6-15 Saving For Retirement You are offered the opportunity to put some money away for retirement. You will receive five annual payments of $25,000 each beginning in 40 years. How much would you be willing to invest today if you desire an interest rate of 12%? LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

17 6-16 Saving For Retirement Timeline 0 1 2 … 39 40 41 42 43 44 0 0 0 … 0 25K 25K 25K 25K 25K Notice that the year 0 cash flow = 0 (CF 0 = 0) The cash flows years 1 – 39 are 0 (C01 = 0; F01 = 39) The cash flows years 40 – 44 are 25,000 (C02 = 25,000; F02 = 5) LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

18 6-17 Saving For Retirement continued Calculator Approach Use cash flow keys: CF; CF 0 = 0; C01 = 0; F01 = 39; C02 = 25000; F02 = 5; NPV; I = 12; CPT NPV = 1084.71 LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

19 6-18 Quick Quiz – Part I Suppose you are looking at the following possible cash flows: Year 1 CF = $100; Years 2 and 3 CFs = $200; Years 4 and 5 CFs = $300. The required discount rate is 7% What is the value of the cash flows at year 5? What is the value of the cash flows today? What is the value of the cash flows at year 3? LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

20 6-19 Annuities and Perpetuities 6.2 Annuity – finite series of equal payments that occur at regular intervals If the first payment occurs at the end of the period, it is called an ordinary annuity If the first payment occurs at the beginning of the period, it is called an annuity due Perpetuity – infinite series of equal payments LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

21 6-20 Annuities and Perpetuities – Basic Formulas Perpetuity: PV = C / r Annuities: LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

22 6-21 Annuities and the Calculator You can use the PMT key on the calculator for the equal payment The sign convention still holds Ordinary annuity versus annuity due You can switch your calculator between the two types by using the 2 nd BGN 2 nd Set on the TI BA-II Plus If you see “BGN” or “Begin” in the display of your calculator, you have it set for an annuity due Most problems are ordinary annuities LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

23 6-22 Annuity – Example 1 After carefully going over your budget, you have determined that you can afford to pay $632 per month towards a new sports car. Your bank will lend to you at 1% per month for 48 months. How much can you borrow? LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

24 6-23 Annuity – Example 1 continued You borrow money TODAY so you need to compute the present value. Formula Approach Calculator Approach 48 N; 1 I/Y; -632 PMT; CPT PV = 23,999.54 ($24,000) LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

25 6-24 Annuity – Sweepstakes Example Suppose you win the Publishers Clearinghouse $10 million sweepstakes. The money is paid in equal annual installments of $333,333.33 over 30 years. If the appropriate discount rate is 5%, how much is the sweepstakes actually worth today? Formula Approach PV = 333,333.33[1 – 1/1.05 30 ] /.05 = 5,124,150.29 Calculator Approach 30 N; 5 I/Y; 333,333.33 PMT; CPT PV = -5,124,150.29 LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

26 6-25 Annuities on the Spreadsheet - Example The present value and future value formulas in a spreadsheet include a place for annuity payments Click on the Excel icon to see an example LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

27 6-26 Quick Quiz – Part II You know the payment amount for a loan and you want to know how much was borrowed. Do you compute a present value or a future value? You want to receive $5,000 per month in retirement. If you can earn 0.75% per month and you expect to need the income for 25 years, how much do you need to have in your account at retirement? LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

28 6-27 Future Values for Annuities – Example 1 Suppose you begin saving for your retirement by depositing $2000 per year in an RRSP. If the interest rate is 7.5%, how much will you have in 40 years? Formula Approach FV = 2000(1.075 40 – 1)/.075 = 454,513.04 Calculator Approach Remember the sign convention!!! 40 N 7.5 I/Y -2000 PMT CPT FV = 454,513.04 LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

29 6-28 Annuity Due – Example 1 You are saving for a new house and you put $10,000 per year in an account paying 8% compounded annually. The first payment is made today. How much will you have at the end of 3 years? LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

30 6-29 Annuity Due – Example 1 Timeline 0 1 2 3 10000 10000 10000 32,464 35,061.12 LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

31 6-30 Annuity Due – Example 1 continued Formula Approach FV = 10,000[(1.08 3 – 1) /.08](1.08) = 35,061.12 Calculator Approach 2 nd BGN 2 nd Set (you should see BGN in the display) 3 N -10,000 PMT 8 I/Y CPT FV = 35,061.12 2 nd BGN 2 nd Set (be sure to change it back to an ordinary annuity) LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

32 6-31 Perpetuity – Example 1 The Home Bank of Canada want to sell preferred stock at $100 per share. A very similar issue of preferred stock already outstanding has a price of $40 per share and offers a dividend of $1 every quarter. What dividend would the Home Bank have to offer if its preferred stock is going to sell? LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

33 6-32 Perpetuity – Example 1 continued Perpetuity formula: PV = C / r First, find the required return for the comparable issue: 40 = 1 / r r =.025 or 2.5% per quarter Then, using the required return found above, find the dividend for new preferred issue: 100 = C /.025 C = 2.50 per quarter LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

34 6-33 Growing Perpetuity The perpetuities discussed so far have constant payments Growing perpetuities have cash flows that grow at a constant rate and continue forever Growing perpetuity formula: LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

35 6-34 Growing Perpetuity – Example 1 Hoffstein Corporation is expected to pay a dividend of $3 per share next year. Investors anticipate that the annual dividend will rise by 6% per year forever. The required rate of return is 11%. What is the price of the stock today? LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

36 6-35 Growing Annuity Growing annuities have a finite number of growing cash flows Growing annuity formula: LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

37 6-36 Growing Annuity – Example 1 Gilles Lebouder has just been offered a job at $50,000 a year. He anticipates his salary will increase by 5% a year until his retirement in 40 years. Given an interest rate of 8%, what is the present value of his lifetime salary? LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

38 6-37 Quick Quiz – Part IV You want to have $1 million to use for retirement in 35 years. If you can earn 1% per month, how much do you need to deposit on a monthly basis if the first payment is made in one month? What if the first payment is made today? You are considering preferred stock that pays a quarterly dividend of $1.50. If your desired return is 3% per quarter, how much would you be willing to pay? LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

39 6-38 Work the Web Example Another online financial calculator can be found at MoneyChimp Click on the web surfer and work the following example Choose calculator and then annuity You just inherited $5 million. If you can earn 6% on your money, how much can you withdraw each year for the next 40 years? Payment = $332,307.68 LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited

40 6-39 Table 6.2 – Summary of Annuity and Perpetuity Calculations LO1 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited


Download ppt "6-0 Multiple Cash Flows 6.1 – FV Example 1 You currently have $7,000 in a bank account earning 8% interest. You think you will be able to deposit an additional."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google