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Bully Prevention and Positive Behavior Support Presenters: Tanya Shea, School Psychologist & Lindsey Sieczko, Social Worker October 9, 2014 Adapted from.

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Presentation on theme: "Bully Prevention and Positive Behavior Support Presenters: Tanya Shea, School Psychologist & Lindsey Sieczko, Social Worker October 9, 2014 Adapted from."— Presentation transcript:

1 Bully Prevention and Positive Behavior Support Presenters: Tanya Shea, School Psychologist & Lindsey Sieczko, Social Worker October 9, 2014 Adapted from Patricia A. Graczyk, PhD University of Illinois at Chicago

2 Overview of Presentation Why important Bullying across the ages What to do to prevent bullying What to do to deal with bullying when it occurs Cyber-bullying Resources

3 Why important 15-25% of children are bullied regularly Significant effects on victims, bullies, and bystanders Estimated 10% of workers have experienced bullying (Nielsen, Matthiesen, & Einarsen, 2010) Increases awareness and provides tools for students, parents, and staff in all settings Estimated that adults know about only 10% of bullying acts- need to empower children

4 Bullying Defined Aggression (Physical or verbal) Repeated-we need to teach children the difference between true bullying and teasing Power differential Intentional

5 Developmental differences in Bullying Behaviors

6 Types of Bullying Direct bullying Physical Verbal Indirect (Relational or Reputational): use personal relationship to harm someone damage standing in peer group -- gossip, shunning, having others do the “dirty work” Isolation

7 Bullying behaviors common in Primary Grades Direct: Physical abuse Verbal abuse – name-calling, laughing Indirect: Refuse to share or play

8 Bullying behaviors common in Intermediate Grades Physical abuse Verbal abuse – name-calling, laughing at Refuse to share, play or work with victim Indirect isolation- (especially among girls) such as telling peers who they can and cannot play with Making fun of peers on Instagram or through text messages

9 Cyber-Bullying Repeatedly teasing or spreading damaging rumors using social media. 20% of teens report being victims at some point. Bully can be anonymous Can be wide-spread quickly Difficult to take back

10 Bystanders Bullying is group process Present during 85% of bullying activities Hoover et al., 1992: 88% of Middle & High School students reported that they observed bullying

11 Types of Bystanders Outsiders: Withdraw & avoid involvement Reinforces: Assist and encourage bully Followers: Join in the bullying once it is started Defenders: Try to help victim – only about 11%... This is the area we need to focus on

12 Bystanders (cont’d) In most cases, bystanders do not stop the bully, which can actually be reinforcing to the bully Yet... Hawkins et al. 2001: In the majority of cases, when bystanders did intervene and try to stop a bully, they were effective! Horner (2006): Can reduce bullying by 85% if focus on peer interventions

13 Warning Signs for Victims Unexplainable injuries or physical complaints Changes in eating habits Lost or destroyed belongings Difficulty sleeping or with nightmares Declining grades or avoiding school Loosing friends or avoiding of social situations Helplessness or decreased self esteem Self-destructive behaviors or talk

14 Warning Signs for Bullies Get into physical or verbal fights Have friends who bully others Get sent to the principal’s office or to detention frequently Unexplained extra money or new belongings Blame others for their problems Don’t accept responsibility for their actions Are competitive and worry about reputation

15 Reporting Bullying Provide detail: names, places, dates, times, and behaviors Tip line (anonymous) Talk to principal or Student Services Coordinator Requires schools to do an investigation Allows us to ask helpful questions Can offer additional support Confidentially must be maintained

16 Our Goal at Graham To empower the Victims To empower the bystanders to become upstanders To make it clear that bullying will not be tolerated at Graham Elementary at any level To develop strong Graham citizens that will become strong citizens in their world!

17 Your Role is Crucial Inconsistent responses by adults can reinforce problem behavior and increase its frequency Adult needs to reinforce the importance of a child standing up for themselves and/or getting help (empowering child) Adult response is the most critical factor to preventing bullying behaviors

18 Our Role as Teachers Bugs and Brag box or teacher mailbox in classrooms to allow the children to have a voice- can put an anonymous note in to alert the teacher to the situation Weekly classroom meetings Reinforcing the children that they can stand up for themselves

19 Your Role as Parents: Make sure your child feels that they can come to you with ANY problems Listen! Reassure your child that you will alert the appropriate adults to help. Encourage your child to be an upstander, and to report bully issues they see at school, even if they are not the target

20 Parent Role Continued: Model expected behaviors of being responsible and respectful in your lives Contact your child’s teacher, Mrs. Witkowski and/or Ms. Walton Hotline available:

21 Resources: Batsche, G. M., & Knoff, H. M. (1994). Bullies and their victims: Understanding a pervasive problem in the schools. 5. School Psych. Review, 23(2), EJ Just Kidding by T. Ludwig – intermediate grades-resource guide in back. 10.

22 Questions & Answers…


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