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Facets Of Intelligence By tryigniteaspark. Intelligence of a human is defined by Intelligence Quotient/IQ Multiple Intelligences/Gardeners Definition.

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Presentation on theme: "Facets Of Intelligence By tryigniteaspark. Intelligence of a human is defined by Intelligence Quotient/IQ Multiple Intelligences/Gardeners Definition."— Presentation transcript:

1 Facets Of Intelligence By tryigniteaspark

2 Intelligence of a human is defined by Intelligence Quotient/IQ Multiple Intelligences/Gardeners Definition Emotional Intelligence/EQ

3 Intelligence Quotient/IQ Intelligence Quotient (IQ) is the score you get on an intelligence test. Originally, it was a quotient (a ratio): IQ= MA/CA x 100 [MA is mental age, CA is chronological age]. Today, scores are calibrated against norms of actual population scores. Modern IQ tests produce scores for different areas (e.g., language fluency, three-dimensional thinking, etc.), with the summary score calculated from subtest scores.

4 Intelligence Quotient/IQ An intelligence quotient, or IQ, is a score derived from one of several different standardized tests designed to assess intelligence. The term "IQ," from the German Intelligenz-Quotient, was devised by the German psychologist William Stern in 1912 as a proposed method of scoring children's intelligence tests such as those developed by Alfred Binet and Theodore Simon in the early 20th Century. IQ scores have been shown to be associated with such factors as morbidity and mortality, parental social status, While the heritability of IQ has been investigated for nearly a century, controversy remains regarding the significance of heritability estimates

5 Multiple Intelligences The theory of multiple intelligences, developed by psychologist Howard Gardner in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s, posits that individuals possess eight or more relatively autonomous intelligences. Individuals draw on these intelligences, individually and corporately, to create products and solve problems that are relevant to the society. The eight identified intelligences include linguistic intelligence, logical-mathematical intelligence, spatial intelligence, musical intelligence, bodily-kinesthetic intelligence, naturalistic intelligence, interpersonal intelligence, and intrapersonal intelligence

6 Linguistic, ability to analyze information and create products involving oral and written language such as speeches, books, and memos. Logical Mathematical, ability to develop equations and proofs, make calculations, and solve abstract problems. Spatial, ability to recognize and manipulate large-scale and fine- grained spatial images. Musical, ability to produce, remember, and make meaning of different patterns of sound. Naturalist, ability to identify and distinguish among different types of plants, animals, and weather formations that are found in the natural world. Bodily-Kinesthetic, ability to use one’s own body to create products or solve problems. Interpersonal, ability to recognize and understand other people’s moods, desires, motivations, and intentions Intrapersonal, ability to recognize and understand his or her own moods, desires, motivations, and intentions

7 Emotional Intelligence Emotional intelligence (EI) refers to the ability to perceive, control and evaluate emotions. Some researchers suggest that emotional intelligence can be learned and strengthened, while others claim it is an inborn characteristic. If you have high emotional intelligence you are able to recognize your own emotional state and the emotional states of others, and engage with people in a way that draws them to you. You can use this understanding of emotions to relate better to other people, form healthier relationships, achieve greater success at work, and lead a more fulfilling life. Emotional Intelligence also includes, Perceiving Emotions, Reasoning With Emotions, Understanding Emotions, and Managing Emotions

8 Differences between IQ, EQ and MI Emotional Quotient (EQ) is a way to measure how a person recognizes emotions in himself or herself and others, and manages these emotional states to work better as a group or team. Intelligence Quotient (IQ) is a value that indicates a person's ability to learn, understand, and apply information and skills in a meaningful way. The major difference between EQ and IQ is what part of a person's mental abilities they measure: understanding emotion or understanding information. MI is that individuals possess eight or more relatively autonomous intelligences. Individuals draw on these intelligences, individually and corporately, to create products and solve problems that are relevant to the society. Whereas IQ is a value that indicates a person's ability to learn and EQ is a way to measure how a person recognizes emotions in himself or herself and others

9 How These Intelligences Promote Learning To help all learners develop into well-rounded individuals who can express themselves, form enduring relationships, contribute usefully in the world and achieve their learning potential. Some educational organizations see academic learning as distinct from emotional and social development. They are not educating their pupils for a world where the ability to communicate, work collaboratively with others and continue learning are the keys to success and fulfillment Intelligence has been a useful concept for planning education for over a century. It is a difficult concept to define. Aspects of the definition that seem to have wide appeal include learning speed, adaptability, and ability to perform successfully. Individual intelligence tests are used in schools and other educational settings to provide information about children's and adolescents' ability to express themselves, reason and problem solve, and perform on a variety of tasks

10 Helps teachers explain and promote understanding at intrapersonal, interpersonal and cultural levels. Often validates teachers' insightful and intuitive assessments of students' natural talents and offers them justifications and assistance in creating related personalized educational accommodations and experiences. Aids teachers in easily creating more personalized and diversified instructional experiences Offers teachers assistance in helping students become empowered learners by extending and promoting cognitive bridging techniques based on the seven intelligences; by fostering deep meta cognitive understanding; and by advancing suggestions for a broad array of diversified study skills techniques. Provides teachers, parents and students with a more extensive and egalitarian conceptualization of giftedness. How These Intelligences Promote Learning

11 How Personal, Social And Cultural Factors Influence Learning Where cultural background encourages the experience of different learning opportunities then the pupil will have more opportunities of developing effective learning skills. An example may be a cultural tradition where men are considered aggressive and competitive, while women are expected to be docile and oriented towards home and family. Not all pupils acknowledge the value of learning. If a pupil has low-level skills, they may deny the importance of learning as a defense mechanism to prevent exposing themselves or the reason might be a lack of family or peer support for learning.

12 Social Factors influence the process of learning are increasingly being applied by educationalists. Theorists argue that individuals cannot be considered in isolation from their social and historical context and therefore it is necessary to look at the society and the developments occurring at a given time. Two principal agencies, the family and the school powerfully shape children’s learning experiences. The influence of these two agencies is constrained by the wider social and cultural systems into which they are embedded. There is great diversity in cultural backgrounds, social conditions, family arrangements and school organization. These two factors have been going through constant modifications “learning is primarily a cognitive, representational process in which the representations are mentally transformed, stored either symbolically or iconically, and retrieved before being manifested as imitation ” How Personal, Social And Cultural Factors Influence Learning

13 Some philosophers such as Plato and Descartes suggested that certain things are inborn, or that they simply occur naturally regardless of environmental influences. A number of characteristics are tied to environmental influences. How a person behaves can be tied to influence such as parenting styles and learned experiences. For example, a child might learn through observation and reinforcement to say 'please' and 'thank you.' Another child might learn to behave aggressively by observing older children engage in violent behavior on the playground. Today, the majority of experts believe that behavior and development are influenced by both nature and nurture. However, the issue still rages on in many areas such as in the debate on the origins of homosexuality and influences on intelligence. While few people take the extreme nativist or extreme empiricist approach, researchers and experts still debate the degree to which biology and environment influence behavior.

14 All rights reserved. tryigniteaspark.wordpress.com References Factors That Influence Learning. StudyMode.com. Retrieved 11, 2012 (http://www.sciencedaily.com/articles/i/intelligence_quotient.htm (http://www.princeton.edu/tmve/wiki100k/docs/Intelligence_quotient.htm)http://www.princeton.edu/tmve/wiki100k/docs/Intelligence_quotient.htm Beasley, K. (1987) "The Emotional Quotient." Mensa Magazine - United Kingdom Edition What's the Big Attraction? Why Teachers are Drawn to using Multiple Intelligence Theory in their Classrooms by Leslie Owen Wilson JamesI. Perkins College of Education at Stephen F. Austin State University) (Spencer, K., 1991, p.194). (Sternberg, R., Grigorenko, E. L., & Kidd, K. K. (2005.) Intelligence, Race, and Genetics.) Thorndike, R. M. (with Lohman, D. F.) (1990). A century of ability testing. Chicago: Riverside) Bowl, M., Cooke, S. and Hockings, C. (2008), Researching across boundaries and borders: the challenges for research. Educational Action Research Brody, N. (1997). Intelligence, schooling and society. American Psychologist, 52, 1046–1050. Cooper, R. S. (2005). Race and IQ: Molecular Genetics as Deus ex Machina. American Psychologist, 60, 71–76. Terman, L. M. (1918). Tests of general intelligence. Psychological Bulletin, 15(5) 160–167.


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